tesseractcat's recent activity

  1. Comment on What if phones were actually designed for hands? in ~design

    tesseractcat
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    I have an S8, and while it's a little smaller than the Pixel 6, I have no problem using it with one hand. Most apps put their controls on the bottom, and I have a gesture that shifts the screen...

    I have an S8, and while it's a little smaller than the Pixel 6, I have no problem using it with one hand. Most apps put their controls on the bottom, and I have a gesture that shifts the screen down when I need to tap something on the top half.

    Maybe it's because I have a different way of holding the phone than the author. Instead of having all four fingers wrapped around the phone, I use my pinky as a base (supporting the bottom of the phone). This allows me to shift the phone around in my hand pretty easily.

    Advanced haptics would still be nice though.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Do you feel like many systems are on the verge of collapse? in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link
    Honest question, how would we be able to tell if our systems "are on the verge of collapse" or if they are able to continue to somewhat gracefully degrade to reduced/alternative service (with a...

    Honest question, how would we be able to tell if our systems "are on the verge of collapse" or if they are able to continue to somewhat gracefully degrade to reduced/alternative service (with a lot of complaining of course).

    I've read conjecture similar to this, essentially saying that many of the worlds governments, economies, and logistic systems are an interconnected web that could collapse if any piece breaks. However it seems like the pandemic has tested this theory and at least shown that the 'system' is more resilient than expected.

    15 votes
  3. Comment on Where do I start with _____? in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    This is something that is ultimately pretty personal and depends on what kind of knowledge you want to store. Personally I've been using Obsidian and enjoying it a lot. The main thing I've learned...

    This is something that is ultimately pretty personal and depends on what kind of knowledge you want to store. Personally I've been using Obsidian and enjoying it a lot.

    The main thing I've learned about knowledge management (and habits in general) is that it should be as easy as possible. If you're struggling to get in the habit of taking notes, any system that requires complex categorization, or adds barriers to taking a note is detrimental.

    While making a fancy categorization/directory structure feels nice, it can be painful in the long run, as it makes it more difficult to do the one thing you want to do: make notes. If I need more categorization, I just create a new note linking to other notes.

    To that end, I've settled on a flat directory of markdown files. Each note describes a concept or idea. If I mention a concept I've made a note of before, I just create a link using the [[square bracket]] link notation. There's a nice plugin for Obsidian that makes it easy to automatically commit changes to a git repo, so that's how I sync/backup my notes.

    I pretty much make a note of anything I want to remember: grammar/vocab for language learning, math, how to use software/libraries/programming languages, ideas for creative endeavors, recipes, TODO lists, etc.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on Tildes Game Giveaway Thread: Holiday 2021 in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    I'd love Jackbox Party Pack 3 if it's still available.

    I'd love Jackbox Party Pack 3 if it's still available.

  5. Comment on Day 1: Sonar Sweep in ~comp.advent_of_code

    tesseractcat
    Link
    Here's Befunge. I had to stop pretty quickly last time because the programs got too complex. Part I >099*9*9*9*9*9*9*9*v > >&: 01 p v v _v#:< \ >$$.@ ` ! ^g10<_1+v ^ <

    Here's Befunge. I had to stop pretty quickly last time because the programs got too complex.

    Part I
    >099*9*9*9*9*9*9*9*v                                                                                 
                  >    >&: 01 p v                                                                               
                       v    _v#:<                                                                        
                       \     >$$.@
                       `                                                                                 
                       !
                  ^g10<_1+v                                                                              
                      ^   <      
    
    5 votes
  6. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I've been working on a multiplayer board game website, https://birdga.me, where you can just share a link and easily have a networked tabletop game with physics. I've basically finished the MVP...

    I've been working on a multiplayer board game website, https://birdga.me, where you can just share a link and easily have a networked tabletop game with physics. I've basically finished the MVP and I have the code on Github. The frontend is written with Three.JS/ES6, and the backend is written in Rust + Warp.

    It's been a really great learning experience, because I didn't really know much about netcode + websockets. But now that I've spent a lot of time working on it there's some design decisions that I might have to rethink:

    • Right now, all the physics is run by whoever hosts the lobby (i.e. the first person to open a lobby). This causes some problems because the physics RTT for players who join the lobby is now their ping + the hosts ping. I'm thinking about running the physics on the server instead, maybe with rapier, although I'm not sure how many games the server itself could handle (it's just a 5$ VPS).
      • With rapier I could probably have deterministic physics which could allow for much more fluid networked physics, although that seems a bit complex. I watched this great GDC talk by a Rocket League developer, but I'm not sure how much of this complexity I really need.
    • At some point I want people to be able to create custom games (with custom textures and models), but I haven't been able to think of a good way to implement that. I'd rather not have to deal with content sharing issues like DMCA or filtering explicit media.
    • Following that, I'm not sure how much I want to trust the individual clients. Each lobby is entirely separate from each other, so maybe it doesn't matter so much if it's easy to cheat, considering you'd most likely be playing with friends who you shared the link with, not random people.
    • I'm also not super happy with the controls right now, but discrete button presses are a lot easier to implement than mouse/touch gestures.
    5 votes
  7. Comment on What are some engrossing self-contained iPhone games? in ~games

    tesseractcat
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    I don't know how many of these are on IOS, but my favorite mobile games are: Downwell Bad North Ridiculous Fishing Mini Metro Holedown Fruit Ninja Another option is to get a DS emulator, although...

    I don't know how many of these are on IOS, but my favorite mobile games are:

    • Downwell
    • Bad North
    • Ridiculous Fishing
    • Mini Metro
    • Holedown
    • Fruit Ninja

    Another option is to get a DS emulator, although I don't know how viable that is on IOS either.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on 5D Chess with Multiverse Time Travel: The Terminator gambit (Game review) in ~games

    tesseractcat
    (edited )
    Link
    I've been really enjoying 5D chess. Personally I've never been too interested in regular chess, but 5D chess appeals to me more. Maybe it's just the uniqueness factor, but there are a lot of...

    I've been really enjoying 5D chess. Personally I've never been too interested in regular chess, but 5D chess appeals to me more. Maybe it's just the uniqueness factor, but there are a lot of aspects of it's gameplay that I like. 5D chess gives you a lot more freedom of movement, and it seems less like commanding a single battle (like in regular chess), and more like commanding an army.

    In 5D chess you have to be constantly aware of multiple different points of weakness, and can more easily set up ambushes, or cut off pathways through time or across boards. You can also set up 'supply lines' of pieces by duplicating a board state and creating a new timeline, or you can 'retreat' and regroup by sending a checked king back through time. The more you expand your army, the more resources and options you have, but it also harms your position by creating more kings which you have to protect.

    I prefer to play the smaller board variations, like 'timeline invasion' instead of the regular board. I've had some interesting games on the 5x5 board variation as well, although I think that's pushing it.

    EDIT: Forgot to mention this, but sadly the game hasn't been really getting any updates recently. There are a lot of missing features: custom boards, custom pieces, custom puzzles, the ability to export/save games, etc. I think what 5D chess as a game needs for continued relevance is an open source reimplementation, or for the developer to come in and add some of these features.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on How do you manage your digital notes? in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I've been using Obsidian + Syncthing, and it's been pretty good. It has a decent Vim mode which is nice, and the plugin + theming system is extensive. I basically keep all my notes as top level...

    I've been using Obsidian + Syncthing, and it's been pretty good. It has a decent Vim mode which is nice, and the plugin + theming system is extensive. I basically keep all my notes as top level files, and link between them, so I don't have to worry too much about organization (but you can organize however you want, i.e. standard directories, tags, etc.).

    The Obsidian mobile app is basically just the desktop app crammed into a mobile UI. It's not terrible and it'll probably give you more power, but it will also probably be less streamlined then other solutions.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on Deathloop - Critical consensus in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I really enjoyed both Dishonored games, and have been looking forward to Deathloop for a while now. Sadly, I think I'm going to hold off on getting it because it seems to be having some...

    I really enjoyed both Dishonored games, and have been looking forward to Deathloop for a while now. Sadly, I think I'm going to hold off on getting it because it seems to be having some performance problems, and I don't really want to support Denuvo.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on When is comedy NOT at the consequence of something else's tragedy? in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    I don't think so, puns are still funny even if you're sure that the other person will get it.

    I don't think so, puns are still funny even if you're sure that the other person will get it.

    20 votes
  12. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tesseractcat
    Link
    Quite a while ago I backed the Looking Glass Portrait, and it arrived about a week ago. It's a really cool piece of tech, which uses lenticular lenses to split the screen into 45-100 different...

    Quite a while ago I backed the Looking Glass Portrait, and it arrived about a week ago. It's a really cool piece of tech, which uses lenticular lenses to split the screen into 45-100 different views, to create a very convincing 3d effect.

    To render these views, you use the 'quilt' format, which is basically just a grid of views (which looks something like this). This is then transformed into content that the lenticular lenses can render via a pixel shader, which looks like this. Each unit has a different set of calibration values, which need to be fed to the pixel shader for it to render the quilt correctly.

    One thing that's super cool about it is that it has a built in Raspberry Pi 4B, which allows it run standalone. Although, the only standalone content it supports is pre-rendered mp4 files. They have some plugins for various 3d engines, like Unity and Unreal, which allow you to render real time content, however it requires being connected to a pc of some sort.

    I wanted to try running realtime content on the Raspberry Pi, so I opened it up and took out the stock MicroSD card, and put in my own (which was loaded with stock RPI OS Lite). I was able to get it to boot, and SSH into it.

    Obviously you can't run Unity or Unreal on a Pi, so my choices for rendering were pretty limited. I didn't want to use pure OpenGL, but I still wanted more low-level control to fine-tune performance. In the end I chose raylib, which is pretty close to the metal, and supports the Raspberry Pi out of the box.

    I learned a lot about the Raspberry Pi rendering stack while working on the project. It turns out that you don't need an X Server to render stuff, you can use something called KMS and DRM (direct rendering manager) to render directly with GPU acceleration (see https://github.com/freedesktop/mesa-kmscube). But this is complicated by the fact that there are two different graphics drivers for the pi, "vc4-fkms-v3d" ("fake" kms) and "vc4-kms-v3d" (kms). I'm not quite sure what the difference is, but the kms version is more performant, but more experimental.

    With the kms driver and raylib, I could render a cube at 3360x3360 (48 views at 8x6) at about 20fps, but rendering 3+ would drop the framerate significantly. With instancing support, I can render a few dozen cubes (or a few hundred quads) without a significant drop in framerate. Without the fullscreen lenticular shader, I was able to get around 30 fps with the same scenes. The lenticular shader needs to make multiple texture calls, with seems to be the culprit (but are necessary).

    Note that: the current release of Mesa drivers for the Pi (19.3.2) supports OpenGL ES 3.1, which seems to support instancing, however raylib only supports OpenGL ES 2.0. Despite that, it was pretty easy to just search and replace GLES2 with GLES3.

    Here are some GIFs of stuff I got working:

    9 votes
  13. Comment on Steam Deck - Valve's Switch-style portable gaming PC, starting at $399 USD and shipping in December 2021 in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    That shouldn't be too big of a problem, as the control scheme seems like an evolved form of the steam controller, which worked pretty well for pc (M+KB) games.

    That shouldn't be too big of a problem, as the control scheme seems like an evolved form of the steam controller, which worked pretty well for pc (M+KB) games.

    5 votes
  14. Comment on Cheat-maker brags of computer-vision auto-aim that works on “any game” in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I'm not surprised that something like this is starting to be possible. In the end, there won't be any way to completely prevent it, because of the analog hole. I suspect that we'll see an arms...

    I'm not surprised that something like this is starting to be possible. In the end, there won't be any way to completely prevent it, because of the analog hole. I suspect that we'll see an arms race where anticheat tries to detect 'inhuman' movement, and the bot developers try to make their movement more similar to a very skilled human.

    In the end I suspect this won't be that big of a deal though, as there are plenty of games where it's really easy to cheat undetected (like chess). And it will probably struggle significantly with games that have friendly fire (see: Rainbow 6 Siege).

    15 votes
  15. Comment on Nintendo Switch (OLED Model) in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    This isn't really a problem now as Cemu has asynchronous shader compilation with Vulkan.

    This isn't really a problem now as Cemu has asynchronous shader compilation with Vulkan.

    5 votes
  16. Comment on Recommendation for new season? in ~anime

    tesseractcat
    Link
    Some of my favorites are Uchuu Kyoudai (follows an aspiring astronaut), Nichijou (slice of life comedy, like Daily Lives of Highschool Boys), Natsume Yuujinchou, Mob Psycho 100 (by the same guy...

    Some of my favorites are Uchuu Kyoudai (follows an aspiring astronaut), Nichijou (slice of life comedy, like Daily Lives of Highschool Boys), Natsume Yuujinchou, Mob Psycho 100 (by the same guy who made One Punch Man, arguably better), and Hinamatsuri (similar to Saiki K in some ways, both are comedies about psychics).

    5 votes
  17. Comment on Playdate Update - 6/8/2021 in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I really love the idea of a portable console for indie games, but it seems expensive for what it is. I feel like there's a market for a 'pico-8' alike DS, designed for easy development and maybe...

    I really love the idea of a portable console for indie games, but it seems expensive for what it is. I feel like there's a market for a 'pico-8' alike DS, designed for easy development and maybe with a gimmick or two of its own thrown in. I just don't see it happening at 179$.

    4 votes
  18. Comment on "Using an implant, a paralyzed individual managed to type out roughly ninety characters per minute simply by imagining that he was writing those characters out by hand." in ~science

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    On the other hand, it might be harder to identify pressing an E vs a W.

    On the other hand, it might be harder to identify pressing an E vs a W.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on Suggestions for meta animes? in ~anime

    tesseractcat
    (edited )
    Link
    Probably the best 'meta' animes I've seen would be "Nichijou" and "Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan". I'm not sure if they could be considered meta, but I would also recommend "Hinamatsuri" and "Mob Psycho...

    Probably the best 'meta' animes I've seen would be "Nichijou" and "Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan". I'm not sure if they could be considered meta, but I would also recommend "Hinamatsuri" and "Mob Psycho 100".

    Also, in the same vein as 'Danshi Koukousei no Nichijou', check out 'Azumanga Daioh'.

    There's also Gintama, but it's a bit of an acquired taste.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on Cryptocurrency is an abject disaster in ~tech

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Free CPU time is inherently valuable, I think this would be inevitable either way, if not cryptocurrency some other valuable form of compute.

    Free CPU time is inherently valuable, I think this would be inevitable either way, if not cryptocurrency some other valuable form of compute.

    3 votes