tesseractcat's recent activity

  1. Comment on Which smartphone and carrier are you using? (USA only) in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link
    I'm using a Xiaomi Mi A1 in the US with Cricket wireless. It doesn't work with LTE most places, but honestly I'm fine with 3g. However, I am a bit worried since I've been hearing news of 3g...

    I'm using a Xiaomi Mi A1 in the US with Cricket wireless. It doesn't work with LTE most places, but honestly I'm fine with 3g. However, I am a bit worried since I've been hearing news of 3g networks being discontinued. I'm planning on getting a new phone whenever AT&T/Cricket disables 3g. Otherwise, I'm very happy with the Mi A1, since it runs Android one (basically stock android), and it has a pretty long battery life,

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Light themes or Dark themes? in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    If all you want to do is read sideloaded books, Kindles are fine. Although they don't natively support the de facto open standard for ebooks (epubs), nor do they support CBZ/CBR files (it isn't...

    If all you want to do is read sideloaded books, Kindles are fine. Although they don't natively support the de facto open standard for ebooks (epubs), nor do they support CBZ/CBR files (it isn't too difficult to convert using software like calibre though, so it's not really an issue for anyone willing to spend a few seconds converting). Still though, I recommend Kobo's instead of kindle since they don't actively prevent third party software, allow fonts, support a much wider range of file formats, and have comparable features and pricing.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Light themes or Dark themes? in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    Calibre works on Kobo too. And if you install koreader on Kobo you can use calibre's opds server or Calibre sync. Open means it easy to install third party software and modifications.

    Calibre works on Kobo too. And if you install koreader on Kobo you can use calibre's opds server or Calibre sync.

    Open means it easy to install third party software and modifications.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Light themes or Dark themes? in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    Kobo ereaders are a good alternative, and they are much more open than Kindles. To install third party software on the Kindle you have to jailbreak but on Kobo you can use the default update process.

    Kobo ereaders are a good alternative, and they are much more open than Kindles. To install third party software on the Kindle you have to jailbreak but on Kobo you can use the default update process.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Devuan, a systemd-less Debian just got hacked in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link
    Kinda funny how a distribution determined to remove a supposedly bloated element of the OS gets hacked and has their site replaced with a less bloated version (gopher).

    Kinda funny how a distribution determined to remove a supposedly bloated element of the OS gets hacked and has their site replaced with a less bloated version (gopher).

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Python noob having trouble installing black in ~comp

    tesseractcat Link
    Pip is a package manager for python modules that ships with python. Depending on how you installed it, you can execute it via pip, pip3, python3 -m pip, or python -m pip. Most likely it will...

    Pip is a package manager for python modules that ships with python. Depending on how you installed it, you can execute it via pip, pip3, python3 -m pip, or python -m pip. Most likely it will simply be pip. You would run this from the terminal, since pip is a command line program.

    10 votes
  7. Comment on Valve Index in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    Fortunately Steam Proton has working VR support, so they'll most likely continue to support Linux.

    Fortunately Steam Proton has working VR support, so they'll most likely continue to support Linux.

    5 votes
  8. Comment on What are your dreams like? in ~talk

    tesseractcat Link
    I actually keep a dream journal, so I consistently remember my dreams day to day. If you want to try to increase the amount of dreams that you remember, I recommend trying out a dream journal....

    I actually keep a dream journal, so I consistently remember my dreams day to day. If you want to try to increase the amount of dreams that you remember, I recommend trying out a dream journal. Even if you don't remember a dream, just write down what you would have wanted to dream about in the journal.

    Usually each night my dreams have about 2-6 separate stories/plots. Sometimes they are interwoven, and other times they are separate. My dreams can vary wildly, sometimes I'll have dreams that seem almost like real life, like I'm doing something normal at home or school, and interacting with people I know. Other times my dreams will be completely nonsensical. For example, tonight I dreampt that a scientist discovered a "psychic" star that is coming toward earth and being controlled by a sentient asteroid, and that the only way to stop it was by capturing a man that looked like a rat.

    In the dreams with odd plots, such as this one, I'm not always myself. Sometimes I'll be an onlooker, or an entirely different character. Notably, in real life I'm male, but sometimes in a dream I'll be female. I almost never question anything weird that happens in my dreams, and I'll usually completely take the role that I've been given, until I wake up and realize what happened.

    When I wake up, I don't remember all of the events that occurred. While I write the dream down the events slowly come back to me, primarily in the form of images (which is interesting, since in the aphantasia thread I heard that some people with aphantasia remember their dreams in a textual form).
    My dreams are very visually realistic, and my memories of them are about as detailed as memories of real life events, although they are less permanent and fade quickly if I don't write them down.

    I've dabbled a bit in lucid dreaming. I've attempted some of the techniques, such as WILD (which didn't work for me), and consistent reality checks. I managed to get some success out of consistent reality checks, but it becomes quite draining to continue to do them throughout the day, especially when I need to focus on something, so I've stopped doing them. Since I haven't had that many lucid dreams, I haven't really gotten the opportunity to practice controlling them. So most of the time I find myself walking around dream environments until I get bored and wake up, or fall out of lucidity.

    Something I've found interesting and that I haven't seen many people talk about is VR in dreams. I have a VR headset that I use regularly, and sometimes I find myself using VR in dreams. I usually either know this in the dream (since it's part of the plot), or I can see the screen door effect of the VR display in my visual memory of the dream. Usually I'll find myself playing weird nonsensical VR games, although sometimes it just seems like the entire dream is in VR.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on What anime, old or new, did you not expect to enjoy, but now highly recommend? in ~anime

    tesseractcat Link
    Space Brothers/Uchuu Kyoudai is probably one of the best anime I've ever watched. Most people get relatively turned off by the description, since it seems very realistic. I put it off for a while...

    Space Brothers/Uchuu Kyoudai is probably one of the best anime I've ever watched. Most people get relatively turned off by the description, since it seems very realistic. I put it off for a while since the description didn't catch my interest originally. But it's actually really exiting, with an amazing story, and amazing characters. From what I've heard, it does a good job portraying JAXA and the process for becoming an astronaut, along with other details related to the space industry. Although it isn't obvious, it's technically sci-fi, since it takes place sometime in the future, but it's very realistic, making it one of the best hard sci-fi anime I've watched.

    7 votes
  10. Comment on Samsung reveals Galaxy Fold and S10 5G in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    I'm a huge fan of Xiaomi phones, and have been happily using a Mi A1 for quite a while. The biggest problem with Xiaomi phones is that many of them lack support for US LTE bands, which makes them...

    I'm a huge fan of Xiaomi phones, and have been happily using a Mi A1 for quite a while. The biggest problem with Xiaomi phones is that many of them lack support for US LTE bands, which makes them an unwise purchase in 2019, considering 3G is being phased out. For anyone looking to get a Xiaomi phone, I'd strongly recommend making sure it supports the necessary LTE bands for 4G in your area.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Is a password manager essential? in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    Fortunately I've never really encountered anything like that, but I think the easiest thing to do would be to just append a character to the end of the password, such as an exclamation point, and...

    Fortunately I've never really encountered anything like that, but I think the easiest thing to do would be to just append a character to the end of the password, such as an exclamation point, and make a note somewhere. If you frequently have to deal with changing passwords (for example in a business setting) a password manager would definitely be more convenient.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on Is a password manager essential? in ~tech

    tesseractcat Link
    Honestly, I disagree with many people here. They seem to present the argument with 2 main options: Use a password manager and have fully secure passwords for everything. Don't use a password...

    Honestly, I disagree with many people here. They seem to present the argument with 2 main options:

    • Use a password manager and have fully secure passwords for everything.
    • Don't use a password manager and have short, insecure, perhaps even the same password for everything.

    But there is a third option, and that's to use long, secure, different passwords for each site without a password manager. This isn't as hard as it may seem. I'm sure most people have heard of the "battery horse staple" XKCD. My recommendation is to make a password like that, and then vary it a bit based on the name of the site/service you're using, in some formulaic way that allows you to easily know what your password should be for each site/service. With that, you'll be protected from automated attacks that just reuse leaked passwords, and you'll have a long, uncommon password, and you'll be able to easily recall it without needing to install a password manager.

    The only way that you would be vulnerable is if you have multiple passwords leaked, and then someone purposefully reconstructs the pattern you've created, and in that case a password manager would be better.

    7 votes
  13. Comment on Whats the most important alias or function in your bashrc file? in ~comp

    tesseractcat Link Parent
    Another tool that does something similar is dtrx, which is available via the Ubuntu package manager which makes it really convenient for extracting lots of different things.

    Another tool that does something similar is dtrx, which is available via the Ubuntu package manager which makes it really convenient for extracting lots of different things.

  14. Comment on Tildes folks, are you learning another language or multilingual? in ~talk

    tesseractcat Link
    Currently I'm learning Mandarin Chinese with Anki, along with a tutor I meet with occasionally, although I'm not making a huge amount of progress so it's pretty discouraging. A problem with Anki...

    Currently I'm learning Mandarin Chinese with Anki, along with a tutor I meet with occasionally, although I'm not making a huge amount of progress so it's pretty discouraging. A problem with Anki is that if you miss a few days it becomes relatively intimidating to return and study again, which makes it even more difficult to start, and I'll end up missing a week or something and I'll spend the next few days just trying to get back into the habit of using it. There is so much to learn as well, that it's difficult to maintain everything with Anki, as the reviews for decks will become hours long if you're not careful.

    Unlike, for example Spanish, for each word you need to learn the pinyin and the character to be able to understand it when spoken and understand it when written. Currently I've only been studying the pinyin, and the reading is still a ways off. After about a year and a half of study I'm relatively confident with HSK 1 and 2 (not reading, only speaking), and I'm working on HSK 3 and HSK 4, although I'm nowhere near confident with HSK 4. Something that's difficult about Pinyin is that it uses tonal markers, which isn't a problem in and of itself, but my brain has a lot of difficulty memorizing tonal markers. So I'll end up remembering the pronunciation but not the tone, which is very irritating since tones are relatively important to both speech and understanding.

    Another roadblock is that Chinese has barely any cognates, which makes reading anything you don't know all the vocab for extremely difficult, if not impossible. With European languages I can usually piece together what something means even if I hadn't encountered the vocabulary before, but with Chinese it's essentially impossible.

    Along with that, I have a lot of trouble speaking as well. The main difficulty for me is the grammar. While Chinese has similar grammar to English, there's always some "Chinese-y" way to say it that I missed. It's sortof like a logic puzzle for each sentence to discard my English and move everything around in the correct order for it to sound right/be grammatically correct in Chinese. A lot of the time when I try to phrase a sentence I'll be using English grammar that doesn't exist in Chinese, and the Chinese translation will be entirely different using a different grammatical method, and while possible to replicate that sentence in English, it wouldn't be obvious nor my first choice.

    I've been considering using mnemonic systems to make memorizing pinyin more efficient, although I haven't found the motivation to actually create/memorize such a system yet, but I want to do it sometime soon.

    This ended up being really long, and mostly complaints about learning Mandarin, but overall I'm enjoying the process, even if it may seem otherwise in this post. Eventually I'm hoping to be good enough to watch television in Mandarin, as I found it was really helpful when I was learning Spanish.

    9 votes
  15. Comment on What mobile games are worth playing? in ~games

    tesseractcat Link
    My favorite mobile games are Downwell and Ridiculous Fishing. Both have pretty similar gameplay, but they're both good and different in their own way.

    My favorite mobile games are Downwell and Ridiculous Fishing. Both have pretty similar gameplay, but they're both good and different in their own way.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on 2018 Steam Awards Winners Announced in ~games

    tesseractcat Link
    Is Assassin's Creed Odyssey really an "Alternate History" game? I thought that the Assassin's Creed series was for the most part based on real history, or set during real historic events.

    Is Assassin's Creed Odyssey really an "Alternate History" game? I thought that the Assassin's Creed series was for the most part based on real history, or set during real historic events.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Has simulation theory provided an answer to the problem of evil? in ~humanities

    tesseractcat Link
    I doubt that any alien species would create a simulation that was intended to be some sort of paradise. If some alien species wanted to live in a paradise, they could always just string some wires...

    I doubt that any alien species would create a simulation that was intended to be some sort of paradise. If some alien species wanted to live in a paradise, they could always just string some wires into the 'happiness' part of their brain (or brain equivalent) and connect it to a dyson sphere.

    I believe it's much more likely that an alien species would create simulations for other reasons, most likely scientific. Because of this they probably aren't that concerned with the concept of 'good' or 'evil' within the simulations (or even classify our experiences as such). In fact, we may just be a byproduct of a simulation designed to simulate a universe for a purpose other than the small groups of intelligent life that come as a result of it.

    It's like if you were running a simulation of Conway's game of life, you probably don't care that much about the gliders the simulation spawns, rather you care about whatever main structure you were building or watching unfold.

    4 votes
  18. Comment on How do you define your masculinity/femininity? in ~talk

    tesseractcat Link
    I think a large part of masculinity is an element of stoic-ness. This can be toxic when taken to the extreme, as in men who are afraid to show emotions to any extent. However with moderation, I...

    I think a large part of masculinity is an element of stoic-ness. This can be toxic when taken to the extreme, as in men who are afraid to show emotions to any extent. However with moderation, I believe having good control over one's emotions, being objective, and being able to take things in stride are very good qualities.

    26 votes
  19. Comment on Advice for learning a language? in ~hobbies

    tesseractcat Link
    The other suggestions are very good, but eventually a roadblock you'll encounter is vocabulary. A great way to efficiently learn lots of vocabulary is spaced repetition software (SRS). SRS is...

    The other suggestions are very good, but eventually a roadblock you'll encounter is vocabulary. A great way to efficiently learn lots of vocabulary is spaced repetition software (SRS). SRS is essentially a flashcard scheduling system designed to be the most efficient way to memorize content, as it brings up the flashcard at intervals designed to remind you right before you forget. Personally I like Anki because it's FOSS, super configurable, and has a sizeable community. I've been using it to learn Chinese vocab and it's very effective.

    A mistake I see people who use SRS make is that they don't consume any (or very little) content in the
    language they're trying to learn. Once you feel relatively comfortable in the language, try watching a TV show in that language (even just a kids TV show). In my experience, foreign television is an amazing way to improve, as it is the closest to immersion you'll get when you can't actually be in a country where the language is natively spoken.

    5 votes
  20. Comment on Could someone proficient with CSS make a userstyle that moves the vote buttons on posts to the left? in ~tildes

    tesseractcat Link
    I have a theme for this that makes things slightly more like Reddit (which is what I'm used to). It's not perfect but I enjoy it. Here's a pastebin link. This is what it looks like.

    I have a theme for this that makes things slightly more like Reddit (which is what I'm used to). It's not perfect but I enjoy it. Here's a pastebin link.

    This is what it looks like.

    6 votes