tesseractcat's recent activity

  1. Comment on Suggestions for meta animes? in ~anime

    tesseractcat
    (edited )
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    Probably the best 'meta' animes I've seen would be "Nichijou" and "Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan". I'm not sure if they could be considered meta, but I would also recommend "Hinamatsuri" and "Mob Psycho...

    Probably the best 'meta' animes I've seen would be "Nichijou" and "Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan". I'm not sure if they could be considered meta, but I would also recommend "Hinamatsuri" and "Mob Psycho 100".

    Also, in the same vein as 'Danshi Koukousei no Nichijou', check out 'Azumanga Daioh'.

    There's also Gintama, but it's a bit of an acquired taste.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Cryptocurrency is an abject disaster in ~tech

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Free CPU time is inherently valuable, I think this would be inevitable either way, if not cryptocurrency some other valuable form of compute.

    Free CPU time is inherently valuable, I think this would be inevitable either way, if not cryptocurrency some other valuable form of compute.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Have you read "A Gentleman in Moscow"? If so, how would you compare Rules of Civility to it?

    Have you read "A Gentleman in Moscow"? If so, how would you compare Rules of Civility to it?

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Enough with the red screen of almost-death in ~games.game_design

    tesseractcat
    (edited )
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    I think the red screen of death is one of the best solutions to 'how do you inform the player that they are dying no matter where they look on the screen'. If you do it through audio, some people...

    I think the red screen of death is one of the best solutions to 'how do you inform the player that they are dying no matter where they look on the screen'. If you do it through audio, some people might miss it, and if you just have a health bar (or other ui element), you'll forget about it mid-game.

    EDIT: Also this article is kind of strange to me... So it starts by acknowledging that it's a good game design feature, talks about some upcoming ps5 game, and then ultimately ends saying "but it's annoying and there's already a healthbar". Maybe it was a slow news week at Kotaku?

    22 votes
  5. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Fortunately, I don't experience motion sickness. I suspect it would be uncomfortable for people who are susceptible to it though. I make sure to rotate around the heads axis instead of around the...

    Fortunately, I don't experience motion sickness. I suspect it would be uncomfortable for people who are susceptible to it though. I make sure to rotate around the heads axis instead of around the body, which makes things less disorienting.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tesseractcat
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    I've been working on my Portal VR clone again (I posted about it a while ago, honestly I'm surprised there still isn't anything like this, it's been 2 years). I've made some major structural...

    I've been working on my Portal VR clone again (I posted about it a while ago, honestly I'm surprised there still isn't anything like this, it's been 2 years). I've made some major structural changes, including removing the VR level editor and just making it flat screen (having the level editor in VR was more effort than it was worth). Everything's been going pretty smoothly so far, so I suspect it'll only be a few weeks until I've added most of the level elements from portal and fixed the biggest bugs, although I'm really bad at time estimates so who knows.

    Also, this time I've decided to make all the assets myself, so I've been getting better at 3D modelling (still haven't approached texturing yet).

    Anyway, here are some in-progress gifs:
    https://gfycat.com/aliveweightyiceblueredtopzebra
    https://gfycat.com/barrenminiaturechimpanzee

    5 votes
  7. Comment on What game(s) have you tried to repeatedly get into but ultimately could not? in ~games

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Strange, it's the opposite for me. I really enjoyed the Dark Souls series and Sekiro, but I couldn't find the 'hook' for Monster Hunter. I think the main problem I had with Monster Hunter is all...

    Strange, it's the opposite for me. I really enjoyed the Dark Souls series and Sekiro, but I couldn't find the 'hook' for Monster Hunter. I think the main problem I had with Monster Hunter is all the extraneous stuff that you have to learn before you can actually hunt monsters.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on What game(s) have you tried to repeatedly get into but ultimately could not? in ~games

    tesseractcat
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    The Witcher 3... It seems to be considered one of the best games ever, but I've tried to play through it a few times, and the combat was been pretty lackluster, and I could never really get that...

    The Witcher 3... It seems to be considered one of the best games ever, but I've tried to play through it a few times, and the combat was been pretty lackluster, and I could never really get that interested in the story. I think people forgive the gameplay because of the story, but if I can't get into the story then I just have subpar gameplay to work with.

    17 votes
  9. Comment on Trio | Social video optimized for threes in ~tech

    tesseractcat
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    What if I want to have a video call with four people?

    What if I want to have a video call with four people?

    8 votes
  10. Comment on Nintendo’s obsession with gameplay is dumb. Here’s why. in ~games.game_design

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    As a counterpoint, I really enjoyed Super Mario 3D World. I didn't really want a story or anything, I just wanted a nice collection of well designed 3D platforming levels, and it delivered. To me...

    As a counterpoint, I really enjoyed Super Mario 3D World. I didn't really want a story or anything, I just wanted a nice collection of well designed 3D platforming levels, and it delivered. To me it feels the opposite of exploitative, I knew exactly what it was offering, and it was fun.

    15 votes
  11. Comment on Black Widow - New trailer in ~movies

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    I feel like the last month or two has been very slow with regard to new movies.

    I feel like the last month or two has been very slow with regard to new movies.

    5 votes
  12. Comment on So ... The Expanse in ~tv

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    I feel the same way about some very well received shows, like Dark, or Mr. Robot, but I have to say that I think the Marco Inaros plotline has been my favorite of the whole series. Despite that,...

    I feel the same way about some very well received shows, like Dark, or Mr. Robot, but I have to say that I think the Marco Inaros plotline has been my favorite of the whole series. Despite that, it's really frustrating when I watch a show and feel it's quality has significantly declined and yet no-one else seems to notice or comment on it, so I appreciate comments like this.

  13. Comment on Review a product/service you first used over a year ago in ~life

    tesseractcat
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    The Bugzooka. If you're dealing with a lot of medium sized bugs that tend to land on surfaces, the bugzooka is awesome. It's basically point and click, and it sucks the bug into a transparent...

    The Bugzooka. If you're dealing with a lot of medium sized bugs that tend to land on surfaces, the bugzooka is awesome. It's basically point and click, and it sucks the bug into a transparent container that super easy to empty out. It's way quieter than using a vacuum cleaner, and much cleaner than smushing them. I'm not very comfortable with bugs and it's great because I can maintain a pretty good distance when catching them.

    I've been dealing with a lot of 'brown marmorated stink bugs' recently and it's made dealing with them much more tolerable.

    11 votes
  14. Comment on 9FRONT: Propaganda for a Unix-like OS in ~design

    tesseractcat
    Link
    This site really needs an easy to find about page... The index page is just an abstract photo, and it's awfully hard to find out what they're trying to do, or what this even is. Honestly I got...

    This site really needs an easy to find about page... The index page is just an abstract photo, and it's awfully hard to find out what they're trying to do, or what this even is. Honestly I got more information on the wikipedia page for plan 9 than from browsing the site for 30 seconds.

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Repeatedly finding myself upset with the conversations on Tildes in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    Yeah, sadly the one constant about controversial topics is that they are by definition controversial. I really can't imagine a way where we could both have discussions of controversial topics and...

    Yeah, sadly the one constant about controversial topics is that they are by definition controversial. I really can't imagine a way where we could both have discussions of controversial topics and not have these sort of reactions. Even in totally private discussion groups where everyone should (theoretically at least) hold the same general viewpoints on most topics, I've seen this same cycle crop up...

    I still think some way of opting-out could help make the site more tolerable for people that find themselves drawn into these topics, even if it wouldn't solve the problem altogether.

    8 votes
  16. Comment on Repeatedly finding myself upset with the conversations on Tildes in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    Link
    Anyone else tired of the cyclical nature of: some controversial event happens, big thread on tildes about it (with drama, of course), new thread about how bad tildes is (with more drama, of...

    Anyone else tired of the cyclical nature of: some controversial event happens, big thread on tildes about it (with drama, of course), new thread about how bad tildes is (with more drama, of course), wait for everything to simmer down back to the usual activity level of 10 comments per thread, repeat.

    Maybe we should create a ~controversial group and move any thread that gets too heated over there so people that aren't interested in participating don't have to? Or maybe ban anything that's sufficiently controversial? Honestly I would appreciate any solution that stops this cycle...

    40 votes
  17. Comment on We're in a time loop of time loop movies in ~movies

    tesseractcat
    Link Parent
    I have to disagree, honestly I wouldn't recommend Dark Dark spoilers! I think the final season and ending were very disappointing, and honestly I wouldn't recommend the show because of that. In my...

    I have to disagree, honestly I wouldn't recommend Dark

    Dark spoilers! I think the final season and ending were very disappointing, and honestly I wouldn't recommend the show because of that.

    In my opinion the main point of the show was the mystery behind the time loop and why characters take certain actions/become their future selves. This was totally undermined as many of the actions that were taken were taken just to "preserve the loop". It was infuriating how no-one in the loop seemed to get the concept that you couldn't change anything, and the explanation for how the loop finally ended up broken was totally random and incredibly dissatisfying. I think there were also a lot of plot threads that were left unanswered or barely explored, and characters who ended up having little to no impact on the story.

    I liked the concept and a lot of elements in the show, but the these problems and the final episode with the main characters 'fading out' ruined the rest of the show for me.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on We're in a time loop of time loop movies in ~movies

    tesseractcat
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    I really like time loops as a premise, and I think they could be explored more. My favorite piece of time loop fiction would have to be "Mother of Learning", which is something like if Harry...

    I really like time loops as a premise, and I think they could be explored more. My favorite piece of time loop fiction would have to be "Mother of Learning", which is something like if Harry Potter was in a time loop. It's a bit rough around the edges, but it's probably one of, if not the longest piece of time loop content in existence.

    6 votes
  19. Comment on Popular female biker in Japan revealed to be fifty-year-old uncle using FaceApp in ~tech

    tesseractcat
    Link
    I think as human interaction becomes more digital, we're going to see people's outwards identities become less and less connected to what they look like in real life. I estimate a decade and it'll...

    I think as human interaction becomes more digital, we're going to see people's outwards identities become less and less connected to what they look like in real life. I estimate a decade and it'll be possible to completely modify how you look, sound, and even move in the digital world. If working from home and virtual reality become more popular, I suspect that it will even become culturally accepted for people to have avatars with entirely different appearances. This concept is already gaining traction with 'v-tubers', but as technology makes it easier I don't think it will only apply to public figures.

    Personally, I'm actually looking forward to it. If anyone here has read "Liking What You See, a Documentary" by Ted Chiang, a world like this would be almost the opposite, where attractiveness doesn't matter because it's a choice.

    14 votes
  20. Comment on What exactly is an NFT and why is it suddenly all over the news? in ~talk

    tesseractcat
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Here's my attempt, although it's not exactly academic (I don't necessarily think these premises need an academic response considering many of them are opinions in themselves): Whew, that took a...

    Here's my attempt, although it's not exactly academic (I don't necessarily think these premises need an academic response considering many of them are opinions in themselves):

    Premise One: This is simply an unsubstantiated claim. On a more grand scale this is true, nothing is sustainable as long as entropy rises in the universe. In the short term I think this is incredibly debatable. Renewable energy and techniques exist and are growing more and more popular. 11% of energy in the US is using renewable energy (although if you factor in other consumption I'm sure the number is lower), but any number above zero shows that society is renewable, at least to some extent. Predicting whether or not we can raise this number to something more significant is difficult, and I really don't think anyone could say one way or the other right now.

    Premise Two: This is true, although it's worth pointing out that in the natural world resources are often taken through violence without the interference of humans. The forceful acquisition of another entities' resources has been happening since the first single cell organisms.

    Premise Three: I don't think this is necessarily true. It's certainly true now, (and it was true back when humans were still hunter gatherers). It seems odd to blame it on industrial civilization though, considering every stage of civilization has had to wage some form of war on wildlife. Consider an intelligent alien race that are herbivores, I don't see any reason why they could not evolve to the scale of an industrial civilization and have a significantly lower amount of violence against animals. For humans, there has already been progress on substituting animals in our diets, and it seems presumptuous to think that things will never change for the better here. The other interpretation of this premise is violence against humans, which has been decreasing significantly as industrial civilization has progressed, in fact I think it would be just as apt to argue the opposite, that cumulative violence against humans has decreased as standards of living have risen (as a result of industrial society).

    Premise Four: This is true, however hierarchies are omnipresent in the natural world as well (and are often more violent, with no sense of 'justice' at all). Once again I cite the fact that standards of living have increased as a result of industrial society.

    Premise Five: Once again true, but once again present in nature as well. Personally, it seems silly to advocate for the destruction of civilization just because of the inequal distribution of resources. I suppose it makes sense considering some of the other premises basically state it's futile to change anything about civilization at all, and it will continue onwards until it's destruction, but that seems incredibly nihilistic to me (and ignores much of the progress society has made).

    Premise Six: This is certainly an opinion. I think the premise is looking at human happiness through a utilitarian lens (i.e. has industrial society increased or decreased total human happiness), determining that right now we're in the negative (through some arbitrary calculation), and thus deciding that it's all pointless. To me at least, this feels like a hunter-gatherer saying "We'd never be able to have more than 30 people in a tribe, there just aren't enough animals to hunt". So I guess we'll never be able to tip that scale into the positives, especially considering nothing will change from here on out ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. Also, as a side note, it seems pretty arrogant to assume that we are even capable of "destroying" the planet. Changing the atmospheric composition and temperature will only shift the ecological niches around.

    Premise Seven: Or maybe the longer we wait the better things will be. If number of renewable technologies in existence is a function of time, wouldn't it be better to have more in existence when civilization crashes?

    Premise Eight: The economic system is to some extent just an extension of the natural world. I guess this is where my philosophy fundamentally diverges with the author's. Personally even if everything is doomed, I'd rather see where economics and industrial society can go in this incredibly miniscule amount of time before society collapses, rather then attempting to force everything back to the snail like pace of evolution's naïve hill climbing (which is basically a perpetual state of war, most likely resulting in misery for billions of species).

    Premise Nine: I think discussing how to forcefully destroy society will most likely result in more violence than the progress of industrial civilization, but that's just an opinion.

    Premise Ten: This seems to contradict some of the earlier premises. Society isn't driven by some death wish, it's (for the most part) driven by economics (at least according to the premises). Economics may result in death, but it doesn't have too, especially if there are cheaper ways to get resources (like that big ball of energy in the sky).

    Premise Eleven: The author is obviously trying to advocate for a return to the natural world as well, but the natural world itself is a culture of occupation and violence. In the end it seems like a subjective value judgement which one is worse. Maybe I'd have more respect for the argument if it advocated for destroying all life as we know it, because then this premise would be more internally consistent.

    Premise Twelve: There is no life in this world, only collections of cells. Cells don't really care about anything for the most part, so it really doesn't matter what they do. Some collections of cells "claim" that they have subjective experience, but that's not really true. The fact that these collections of cells "claim" to have individual subjective experience has consequences in the real world.... This is obviously a mischaracterization of what life is, but just because something is socially constructed doesn't make it any less real. Language is just a shared "delusion" but it continues to have significant impacts on people. I guess this argument is just a bit pointless, as any social phenomena can be dismissed like this.

    Premise Thirteen: I agree with this. But where I disagree is that I think humans can improve on this. The only way to subvert this is to collectively hold more power, and to create a microcosm where power and force has less effect. The natural world itself is determined to some large extent by fitness, the ability for organisms to exert power and force on others. This is another premise I would respect more if the argument was instead for the abolition of life itself.

    Premise Fourteen: From birth on, some percentage of people grow up believing this. Some percentage of people don't, as encompassed by the large number of people who don't believe this. The author overlooks the alternative: there are things we like more than the long term health of the world's carrying capacity for humans.

    Premise Fifteen: Makes sense.

    Premise Sixteen: I agree with this too, so why do we blindly accept the billions of human (and hundreds of billions of non-human) deaths that have occurred? Seems like this premise could be used as an argument to further life extension technologies.

    Premise Seventeen: I agree.

    Premise Eighteen: Watch this: "Our current sense of self is more sustainable than our current use of energy or technology." I guess you could say any human civilization, with enough resources and time, would eventually develop into industrial society (as it gives more control over the world, which gives it a competitive advantage), which through these premises is unsustainable, and therefore humanity itself is unsustainable. I think this chain of logic makes sense, but just makes returning to a 'natural world' a simple repetition of the cycle.

    Premise Nineteen: Everything in the natural world seeks to control the natural world. Animals evolve into ecological niches, where they can exert the most control over their environment. It seems like a double standard to praise that but dismiss human society. Once again, I'd like to see what this massive amount of control wielded by one species can do (before we inevitably collapse as a civilization, I suppose).

    Premise Twenty: Community well-being, morals, ethics, and justice all drive decisions to some extent, a privilege granted by humanities large amount of control over nature. Economics drives a lot of decisions, that's true, but I think the balance is actually better under human civilization than you'll find anywhere else.

    Whew, that took a while. I'm sure there are rebuttals to be had, and people who have made these points better than I have. I think we've seen some resurgence in this anti-civilization sentiment recently, and while I don't think it's without merit, I find myself more and more optimistic regarding human society (so I suppose we'll see where it goes). If it's doomed to collapse, then I think it's cool that we were able to try something different, at least for a little while. I'll be disappointed if we're forced to end it early.

    3 votes