15 votes

What are you reading these days? #18

What are you reading currently? Fiction or non-fiction, any genre, any language! Tell us what you're reading, and talk a bit about it.

Past weeks: Week #1 · Week #2 · Week #3 · Week #4 · Week #5 · Week #6 · Week #7 · Week #8 · Week #9 · Week #10 · Week #11 · Week #12 · Week #13 · Week #14 · Week #15 · Week #16 · Week #17

55 comments

  1. unknown user
    Link
    Finally I can be back to reading books freely! Almost. I've read Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, which I talked about last week. It was a great read, and also surprisingly relevant for todays (and...

    Finally I can be back to reading books freely! Almost.

    I've read Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, which I talked about last week. It was a great read, and also surprisingly relevant for todays (and all the history's, for that matter) political problems. Prometheus is made to suffer by the new king of gods, Zeus, because he helped humans by giving them the fire. He's bound to a mountain and made to suffer. He talks of Zeus as a despotic head of a junta, and complains he himself had helped him rise to power, but now see what he got for that help. I won't spoil all the relevant bits of the play, it is 43 pages anyways. As I noted last week, the translator was Azra Erhat. It was a perfect translation, a joy to read. And my edition also included relevant bits from Hesiodic texts, and the poem titled Prometheus by Goethe, which were a nice addition.

    I read my first ebook ever last week! The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. It is such a famous book, by Robert Luis Stevenson, so it doesn't need much introduction. Just that I really enjoyed it. Thanks a lot, @9000, for linking me to the http://standardebooks.org/ website! I was sceptical about ebooks generally, and I haven't read much literature in English, so it's been a nice start for me.

    I am currently reading Understanding Phonology by Carlos Gussenhoven and Haike Jacobs, which, just as title suggests, is an advanced introduction to the field of phonology, a subdiscipline of linguistics that studies how speech sounds are classified and combined to form language constructs. It is one of the main pillars of the entire discipline of linguistics, so it is important to have a good understanding of phonology for anybody who wants to study linguistics (but who am I to say that, I'm only a beginner myself). It is nice, definitely more fast-paced than other introductory texts, but, a few pages in, looks like a good resource TBH.

    The other book I'm about to start reading is Dost "Friend" by the Turkish author Vüs'at O. Bener, which I talked about last week. I haven't started reading it yet, so can't say much about it just yet.

    6 votes
  2. [7]
    iiv
    Link
    After listening to Kate Bush's mindblowing song "Wuthering Heights" too many times I just had to read the book it was inspired by. So these days I'm reading Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. I've...

    After listening to Kate Bush's mindblowing song "Wuthering Heights" too many times I just had to read the book it was inspired by. So these days I'm reading Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. I've heard from other people (it is a famous book after all) that it's the most boring book they've ever read, but I've read maybe a sixth so far, and it's actually funny. I've been laughing out loud in several scenes, and while I haven't come that far into the story, it seems promising. I look forward to finishing it, and relisten Bush's homage.

    Other than that I've been reading a lot of essays in a Swedish magazine published by Lund University. Oh, and just for fun, I've started (slowly) reading through the Svenska Akademiens grammatik, an in depth-view of Swedish grammar.

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      firstname
      Link Parent
      Good luck, i hear our grammar is hard to learn for an outsider. Even we have a hard time to understand it´s logic sometimes. Or perhaps you are Swedish as well?

      Good luck, i hear our grammar is hard to learn for an outsider. Even we have a hard time to understand it´s logic sometimes. Or perhaps you are Swedish as well?

      1 vote
      1. iiv
        Link Parent
        Indeed, I am Swedish. Glad to see another one on here!

        Indeed, I am Swedish. Glad to see another one on here!

        1 vote
    2. [4]
      annadane
      Link Parent
      Heathcliffe, it's me, Cathy...

      Heathcliffe, it's me, Cathy...

      1. [3]
        alyaza
        Link Parent
        i have it on my shelf somewhere and to be honest, i don't find it boring but i would argue that the way it's written more than anything has made the book age pretty poorly and resulted in it...

        After listening to Kate Bush's mindblowing song "Wuthering Heights" too many times I just had to read the book it was inspired by. So these days I'm reading Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. I've heard from other people (it is a famous book after all) that it's the most boring book they've ever read, but I've read maybe a sixth so far, and it's actually funny.

        i have it on my shelf somewhere and to be honest, i don't find it boring but i would argue that the way it's written more than anything has made the book age pretty poorly and resulted in it garnering that reputation. it's kinda dense and it's a bad book for someone who doesn't like non-contemporary prose to read (which is a lot of people), because that's basically the entire book.

        1 vote
        1. [2]
          annadane
          Link Parent
          I guess you probably meant to reply to iiv

          I guess you probably meant to reply to iiv

          1 vote
          1. alyaza
            Link Parent
            oh, yes. this is miraculously the first time this has happened. at least it's not that far away from the parent comment!

            oh, yes. this is miraculously the first time this has happened. at least it's not that far away from the parent comment!

            1 vote
  3. Deimos
    Link
    I've been (slowly) reading The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains. It's interesting, from what I've read so far it's mostly been talking about how the brain adjusts to different...

    I've been (slowly) reading The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.

    It's interesting, from what I've read so far it's mostly been talking about how the brain adjusts to different experiences and technology, and some of the previous changes we've already gone through from technology that's so prevalent now that we don't even really think of it as "technology" any more (like writing). It's fascinating to read about how famous scholars thought books would destroy people's ability to remember anything, and other historical facts that I didn't know about, like that for a long time people always read out loud and that reading silently was almost unheard of.

    5 votes
  4. [9]
    ras
    (edited )
    Link
    I'm still reading the Wheel of Time series. I'm currently on Lord of Chaos. I'm starting to feel a real sunk-cost fallacy feeling involving this series. I really want to know what happens, but the...

    I'm still reading the Wheel of Time series. I'm currently on Lord of Chaos. I'm starting to feel a real sunk-cost fallacy feeling involving this series. I really want to know what happens, but the story has slowed down considerably.

    4 votes
    1. [4]
      emnii
      Link Parent
      This is what keeps me from even starting Wheel of Time. I've heard so much about how some of those novels are just nothing by filler that I don't even want to start it. And damn, 14 books and...

      This is what keeps me from even starting Wheel of Time. I've heard so much about how some of those novels are just nothing by filler that I don't even want to start it. And damn, 14 books and they're all 700+ page monsters? That's a lot of reading. I didn't even finish Malazan :|.

      3 votes
      1. [3]
        cfabbro
        Link Parent
        How dare you! Malazan is my favorite fantasy series of all time, and I have read it four time already... and yes, I do believe that technically makes me a masochist. ;) Did you at least get to...

        I didn't even finish Malazan

        How dare you! Malazan is my favorite fantasy series of all time, and I have read it four time already... and yes, I do believe that technically makes me a masochist. ;)

        Did you at least get to Deadhouse Gates and the Chain of Dogs? That is probably my favorite storylin of the entire series... I cry at the end every time. :(

        1. [2]
          emnii
          Link Parent
          I did! I made it through Toll the Hounds! I'll probably wrap it up eventually, but the allure of new books is hard to resist.

          I did! I made it through Toll the Hounds! I'll probably wrap it up eventually, but the allure of new books is hard to resist.

          1 vote
          1. cfabbro
            (edited )
            Link Parent
            Oh damn... I don't know how you stopped there. The final two books are by far the most exciting, as everything and everyone starts to finally collide and all the various conflicts finally get...

            Oh damn... I don't know how you stopped there. The final two books are by far the most exciting, as everything and everyone starts to finally collide and all the various conflicts finally get wrapped up! I would definitely recommend trying to get back into it before you forgot the bajillion characters in the series.... or you might have to start all over again. :P

    2. [4]
      cfabbro
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Yeah, Wheel of Time can be a real slog to get through after book 4, but I still really enjoyed it and am glad I read it to the end... I definitely don't plan on ever reading the whole thing again...

      Yeah, Wheel of Time can be a real slog to get through after book 4, but I still really enjoyed it and am glad I read it to the end... I definitely don't plan on ever reading the whole thing again though! :P

      If it's any consolation, the pace does pick back up again at around book 10 IIRC, and the final 3 Sanderson books are great IMO... so you only have about ~2000 more pages to suffer through. ;)

      2 votes
      1. ras
        Link Parent
        Yeah, that’s the same thing my friend who’s read them told me. I’m going to do it, mainly because I told myself that I’m going to do it ;)

        Yeah, that’s the same thing my friend who’s read them told me. I’m going to do it, mainly because I told myself that I’m going to do it ;)

        2 votes
      2. [2]
        GuitarSax
        Link Parent
        Not to give anything away, but do the chapters involving the “accepted” ever pickup? Even when the events in those chapters should be exciting, I’ve grown bored reading them. I can’t tell if my...

        Not to give anything away, but do the chapters involving the “accepted” ever pickup? Even when the events in those chapters should be exciting, I’ve grown bored reading them. I can’t tell if my boredom comes from the pacing of their chapters or the character’s internal conflicts. Half of the group’s choices and resulting actions seem like divine coincidence to move the story along.

        1 vote
        1. cfabbro
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          It's been quite a number of years since I read Wheel of Time and I am not a superfan by any means... so everything is a bit fuzzy by this point, but I do seem to remember the accepted/Aes Sedai...

          It's been quite a number of years since I read Wheel of Time and I am not a superfan by any means... so everything is a bit fuzzy by this point, but I do seem to remember the accepted/Aes Sedai characters and plot lines really starting to get pretty exciting once (trying to avoid spoilers so will be generic) the White Tower "event" happens in the last Jordan book (IIRC), and especially once you get into the Sanderson novels.

          Half of the group’s choices and resulting actions seem like divine coincidence to move the story along.

          I mean, that's kind of Wheel of Time in a nutshell. Deus ex machina is a plot device Jordan clearly didn't see a problem with relying on. Hell, Mat is practically the personification of it. :P

          1 vote
  5. emnii
    Link
    I want to say I'm deep into Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes, but I'm only a third into it. But I'm really enjoying it so far, despite my reservations when it starts with someone recounting...

    I want to say I'm deep into Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes, but I'm only a third into it. But I'm really enjoying it so far, despite my reservations when it starts with someone recounting their past exploits. I'm still mad about my experience with The Name of the Wind, which I did not like and did not finish. My first Sykes novel, though The City Stained Red has been in my backlog for a while.

    On a related note, reading on a Kindle makes it kind of hard to gauge how big a book is, particularly side-loaded stuff. I've got a position (not a page count) and a percentage, but that's about it. I had to look up the page count on Goodreads and it's twice the size of my usual 300ish page novel, which explains why it feels like I'm going slower than usual.

    4 votes
  6. [3]
    PopeRigby
    (edited )
    Link
    I'm reading three different books right now. The Art of Invisibility is a really interesting book about online privacy and how you can keep yourself private in the digital age. It's written by a...

    I'm reading three different books right now.

    1. The Art of Invisibility is a really interesting book about online privacy and how you can keep yourself private in the digital age. It's written by a famous hacker (I don't know about him, but then again, I don't know much about famous hackers.)
    2. Masters of Doom tells the story of how the original members of id Software created Doom and their other famous games. I would say it's a must read for any id fan.
    3. Aspergers and You (can't find a link for this one). I just got diagnosed with aspergers, so I got this book. It's supposed to help you deal with some of the things that come with having aspergers.
    3 votes
    1. emnii
      Link Parent
      Loved Masters of Doom. I don't do non-fiction often, but Masters of Doom was worth the read.

      Loved Masters of Doom. I don't do non-fiction often, but Masters of Doom was worth the read.

      2 votes
    2. helbonikster
      Link Parent
      I read Ghost in the Wires, which was essentially Kevin Mitnick's autobiography, at least as it relates to the first half of his life as the most wanted hacker and eventual freedom. Fascinating stuff.

      I read Ghost in the Wires, which was essentially Kevin Mitnick's autobiography, at least as it relates to the first half of his life as the most wanted hacker and eventual freedom. Fascinating stuff.

      1 vote
  7. [2]
    alyaza
    Link
    still working through my "in the process of reading" list from about two months ago, which was: Tyler Anbinder - City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York Mike Davis - Buda's...

    still working through my "in the process of reading" list from about two months ago, which was:

    1. Tyler Anbinder - City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York
    2. Mike Davis - Buda's Wagon: A Brief History of the Car Bomb
    3. Mike Davis - Prisoners of the American Dream: Politics and Economy in the History of the US Working Class
    4. Elizabeth Becker - When The War Was Over: Cambodia And The Khmer Rouge Revolution

    and also Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, '72 by hunter s. thompson, which i just binge read because i like it. now that the semester is winding down, i might actually be able to finish some of these.

    3 votes
    1. alyaza
      Link Parent
      inshallah, i have finished Buda's Wagon: A Brief History of the Car Bomb. pretty good book on a niche topic. if strange weapons of war and their proliferation are your thing, i would recommend. i...

      inshallah, i have finished Buda's Wagon: A Brief History of the Car Bomb. pretty good book on a niche topic. if strange weapons of war and their proliferation are your thing, i would recommend. i have no idea which of the other three i want to attempt to finish off now, though. i'm only like a third of the way through When the War Was Over, and i have almost no progress on either City of Dreams or Prisoners of the American Dream, and i really don't want to start another god damn book, lol.

      1 vote
  8. [8]
    helbonikster
    Link
    I mentioned this in the last one, but I'm currently reading Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. I'm just over 50% through it, and I'm absolutely loving it. In super simplistic terms, it's about a...

    I mentioned this in the last one, but I'm currently reading Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. I'm just over 50% through it, and I'm absolutely loving it. In super simplistic terms, it's about a ragtag group of misfits coming together to pull off an impossible heist. It's book one in a duology, set in the Grishaverse, an ever expanding universe of stories which I'm already looking forward to delving into. I feel like I'm just taking the first bite of a delicious and lavish meal, and I can't wait to gorge myself.

    Other reads in the past month:

    Warcross by Marie Lu: The story was semi-compelling, but the plot felt way too rushed. Book one in a trilogy. The second book, Wildcard, is currently out, but I don't feel super compelled to continue the series. I may get back to it if I run out of higher-priority books. 3.5 stars.

    The Three Body Problem by Liu Cixin: I had been hearing some buzz around this book for a while, so when I saw it in one of my favorite indie bookstores last fall, I figured I'd give it a shot. I really knew next to nothing about it other than it was Chinese sci-fi, set against the backdrop of the cultural revolution, and had been translated into English by Ken Liu, a renowned sci-fi author in his own right. I literally had no expectations for this book, but I ended up enjoying it immensely. The other two books are definitely in my tbr list now. 4.5 stars.

    3 votes
    1. [7]
      acdw
      Link Parent
      Three Body is great! It's such a neat idea that's written so well. Fair warning: the second one is a little weaker, in my opinion, but the third is absolutely incredible and well-worth the hard...

      Three Body is great! It's such a neat idea that's written so well. Fair warning: the second one is a little weaker, in my opinion, but the third is absolutely incredible and well-worth the hard hiking of book 2.

      3 votes
      1. [2]
        helbonikster
        Link Parent
        Interesting. I wonder if it has anything to do with the translations. The first and third books were translated by Ken Liu, while the second was translated by Joel Martinson. Did you notice a...

        Interesting. I wonder if it has anything to do with the translations. The first and third books were translated by Ken Liu, while the second was translated by Joel Martinson. Did you notice a distinct style change in book two?

        2 votes
        1. acdw
          Link Parent
          Maybe? I'm not sure, I read them a little while ago. But at the time I wondered the same thing! I think part of it could be described by the translator, but there's also plotting and other...

          Maybe? I'm not sure, I read them a little while ago. But at the time I wondered the same thing! I think part of it could be described by the translator, but there's also plotting and other large-scale things that weren't as interesting, which a translator wouldn't have control over. But it's still worth reading, I think.

          2 votes
      2. [4]
        mundane_and_naive
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Interesting, I find the second book to be the best one all thanks to the dark forest theory. The others are good too, somehow the author managed to throw in one insane idea after another and it...

        Interesting, I find the second book to be the best one all thanks to the dark forest theory. The others are good too, somehow the author managed to throw in one insane idea after another and it keep me hooked throughout. The dark forest theory, however, isn't just scientific mumbo-jumbo but also has solid logical foundation and I like that a lot. May I ask what do you like and dislike between the books?

        Also side note, I see people typically criticize the books for lack of strong characters and that they mostly just serve as talking-head which I also... mostly agree with. That said though, the books somehow always manage to end on a very poignant note that got me to actually feel for the characters (and humanity as a whole too, given its theme). So this sci-fi story isn't just science talk and there are some real emotions underneath.

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          acdw
          Link Parent
          I think what I didn't like about the second book was how long it took to get going, and all the politicking in like the first third. It felt...sketched out? I'm not sure, it's been a little while....

          I think what I didn't like about the second book was how long it took to get going, and all the politicking in like the first third. It felt...sketched out? I'm not sure, it's been a little while.

          You are right about the poignant endings, though. The entire series kept that up which I really liked, and really made up for the weaknesses in other parts of the plot.

          2 votes
          1. [2]
            mundane_and_naive
            (edited )
            Link Parent
            About how it felt sketched out, I agree. It kind of gives you a bird-eye view of the events only and doesn't let you fully immerse in the plot. There's probably some significance behind the style...

            About how it felt sketched out, I agree. It kind of gives you a bird-eye view of the events only and doesn't let you fully immerse in the plot. There's probably some significance behind the style that I haven't picked up on though. The author used to be an engineer as well so that probably influences the way he writes somewhat.

            Someone commented on Reddit about how the books' theme being actually about surveillance, which I find quite interesting and that help me appreciate a lot of the details in retrospect. That might be part of why it's more popular back in China too since they can probably relate to the story more than us.

            2 votes
            1. acdw
              Link Parent
              hm, that makes sense. Maybe I should revisit it, I might've been coming at it from somewhere else before.

              hm, that makes sense. Maybe I should revisit it, I might've been coming at it from somewhere else before.

  9. [4]
    acdw
    Link
    I just finished Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie, and while my full thoughts are here I can sum them up by saying: it was alright, I thought it served more as a bridge between the first and last...

    I just finished Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie, and while my full thoughts are here I can sum them up by saying: it was alright, I thought it served more as a bridge between the first and last novels than as its own work, and I thought the main character was a little too good.

    I've just started White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo yesterday and The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth today. I'm excited to get into them!

    3 votes
    1. [3]
      emnii
      Link Parent
      I felt really let down by Ancillary Sword, and Ancillary Mercy. Maybe my expectations were too high because I really liked Ancillary Justice but I just didn't enjoy those two follow ups as much.

      I felt really let down by Ancillary Sword, and Ancillary Mercy. Maybe my expectations were too high because I really liked Ancillary Justice but I just didn't enjoy those two follow ups as much.

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        acdw
        Link Parent
        Oh no, Mercy is a let-down too? Don't tell me too much, I'm going to read it, but I was really hoping it'd be a great finale to the series.

        Oh no, Mercy is a let-down too? Don't tell me too much, I'm going to read it, but I was really hoping it'd be a great finale to the series.

        1 vote
        1. emnii
          Link Parent
          Sorry to say your complaints about Sword could be directly applied to Mercy. I had those same complaints.

          Sorry to say your complaints about Sword could be directly applied to Mercy. I had those same complaints.

          2 votes
  10. [10]
    suspended
    Link
    The Roman Army and the New Testament by academic Biblical scholar Christopher B. Zeichmann. Zeichmann's research led him to create the Database of Military Inscriptions and Papyri of Early Roman...

    The Roman Army and the New Testament by academic Biblical scholar Christopher B. Zeichmann. Zeichmann's research led him to create the Database of Military Inscriptions and Papyri of Early Roman Palestine.

    2 votes
    1. [9]
      cfabbro
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Ooh, I might have to check that out. <3 Everything Roman Kingdom/Republic/Empire related, especially military history... and the Biblical influence element is something I haven't read much on. I...

      Ooh, I might have to check that out. <3 Everything Roman Kingdom/Republic/Empire related, especially military history... and the Biblical influence element is something I haven't read much on.

      I recently read Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World by Adrian Goldsworthy and I would highly recommend it if you're similarly interested in the subject.

      p.s. The Roman Army and the New Testament = $111 for the kindle version... WTF?

      1. [8]
        suspended
        Link Parent
        I was one of the contributors so I was thanked in the book, on the website, and given a free hardback copy. I'm not sure why the book is so expensive. I could ask Zeichmann if you'd like.

        I was one of the contributors so I was thanked in the book, on the website, and given a free hardback copy. I'm not sure why the book is so expensive. I could ask Zeichmann if you'd like.

        1 vote
        1. [7]
          cfabbro
          Link Parent
          Oh, neat. Are you a historian or biblical scholar yourself? And yeah, if you could ask that would be cool. I prefer not to pirate books... but $111 is pretty far outside my price range and for a...

          Oh, neat. Are you a historian or biblical scholar yourself? And yeah, if you could ask that would be cool. I prefer not to pirate books... but $111 is pretty far outside my price range and for a digital version that seems rather unreasonably high.

          1 vote
          1. [3]
            suspended
            Link Parent
            I'm a layperson who's been studying Biblical academic scholarship for over twenty years. I was a moderator at r/AcademicBiblical for three years and I'm the founder of r/AskBibleScholars. That's...

            Are you a historian or biblical scholar yourself?

            I'm a layperson who's been studying Biblical academic scholarship for over twenty years. I was a moderator at r/AcademicBiblical for three years and I'm the founder of r/AskBibleScholars. That's how I met Zeichmann as well as other scholars.

            I'll send him a little note of inquiry and let you know as soon as he responds.

            2 votes
            1. [2]
              cfabbro
              Link Parent
              I wasn't aware those subreddits existed or that there was such a large Biblical scholar community on reddit; Cool. Also, much appreciated for reaching out to him.

              I wasn't aware those subreddits existed or that there was such a large Biblical scholar community on reddit; Cool. Also, much appreciated for reaching out to him.

              1. suspended
                Link Parent
                I spend most of my online time at those two subs and Tildes. Sure. No problem at all.

                I spend most of my online time at those two subs and Tildes.

                Also, much appreciated for reaching out to him.

                Sure. No problem at all.

                1 vote
          2. [3]
            suspended
            Link Parent
            Zeichmann responded to our inquiry. Here it is:

            Zeichmann responded to our inquiry. Here it is:

            Part of the deal is that Fotresss academic was bought by Lexington, so a book that I expected to be $40, ended up being $100 - I actually ended up losing money on Indiegogo due to this! Lexington simply prices their books higher than Fotress. I do have a discount code for 30% off the book on the Lexington/Rowman&Littlefield website. It sounds likely that the book will be in paperback for a less astronomical price about a year from now, provided the hardcover sells enough copies.

            One option for your friend is to ask a public or university library to buy a copy - they're usually happy to do so and have a budget dedicated to these things.

            I hope this clarifies - I was definitely a bit frustrated that the book cost so much, as I was hoping ministers and lay readers could afford it, but hopefully that will be the case with the eventual paperback.

            2 votes
            1. [2]
              cfabbro
              (edited )
              Link Parent
              <sigh> publishers... can't live with 'em, and would rather live without 'em. ;) It sounds like I will probably have to wait for the paperback, I guess. Thanks for making the inquiry for me though.

              <sigh> publishers... can't live with 'em, and would rather live without 'em. ;)

              It sounds like I will probably have to wait for the paperback, I guess. Thanks for making the inquiry for me though.

  11. eve
    Link
    I am slowly working my way through Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King. It's a collection of short stories. So far its good! I've never ready any of his books before and I don't read any kind of...

    I am slowly working my way through Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King. It's a collection of short stories. So far its good! I've never ready any of his books before and I don't read any kind of horror so I figured I'd branch out a bit and thought this was a good place to start. It's interesting so far and some part ls I've had to skim over a bit because I'm very squeamish lol.

    I'm also very slowly working my way through The Demon Haunted World by Carl Sagan. I've been reading it during my gym time. I just use the bicycle for 20-30min so it's a very focused time that's helping me get through the book much better than when I first tried to read the book. I'm enjoying it so far and I like reading about his thoughts. It's an important book that I think people should read. It's a shame how much it's getting out of date however.

    2 votes
  12. cwagner
    Link
    Currently reading the ONSET series by Glynn Stewart. It's like every other book by him. Well written, with nothing too complicated, a pure, fun adventure series. This one is the first non-scifi...

    Currently reading the ONSET series by Glynn Stewart. It's like every other book by him. Well written, with nothing too complicated, a pure, fun adventure series. This one is the first non-scifi series I've read by him: Superhero/magic military US organization that fights and contains supernatural threats.

    Don't read Stewart if you want something that makes you think for hours, but if your brain needs a break after, for example, reading The Three-Body Problem, all his books are great.

    2 votes
  13. [3]
    GuitarSax
    Link
    Much like @ras I’m also working my way through the TWoT (The Wheel of Time) series. I’m currently on book 5, The Fires of Heaven, and I think I’ve started to hit the filler slowdown but, I’m doing...

    Much like @ras I’m also working my way through the TWoT (The Wheel of Time) series. I’m currently on book 5, The Fires of Heaven, and I think I’ve started to hit the filler slowdown but, I’m doing my best to soldier through. Altogether, I’m on a bit of a fantasy kick. Prior to TWoT, I read through Brent Week’s Lightbringer series (so far), Patrick Rothfuss’s Kingkiller Chronicles (I need a conclusion!) and all of Sanderson’s Cosmere (so far). I’m hoping to transitions my reading habits over to some historical literature (if not historical fiction) if only to avoid appearing “under-read”. I’m open to suggestions if anyone can help me bridge that gap.

    2 votes
    1. ras
      Link Parent
      Part of the reason I started TWoT is that I figured by the time I was done Rothfuss or Martin may have been able to finish their series! Lol

      Part of the reason I started TWoT is that I figured by the time I was done Rothfuss or Martin may have been able to finish their series! Lol

      2 votes
    2. cfabbro
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      As far as recommending historical fiction goes, it really depends on what you're interested in. But given you're on a fantasy kick, Brian McClellan's Powder Mage Trilogy might be a good place to...

      I’m open to suggestions if anyone can help me bridge that gap.

      As far as recommending historical fiction goes, it really depends on what you're interested in. But given you're on a fantasy kick, Brian McClellan's Powder Mage Trilogy might be a good place to start testing the waters for you. It's magical fantasy but with a more historical fiction feel to it than most other fantasy books I have ever read.

      But if you want more realistic historical fiction with only some minor fantasy/scifi elements, then Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series is quite good too.

      And if you want no fantasy elements whatsoever then there is an absolute ton of excellent series to choose from. I personally enjoy military history a great deal, so Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey–Maturin series (which the Master & Commander movie was based on) is one of my all time favorites.... as is C.S. Forrester's Horatio Hornblower series, Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series, and James Clavell's Asian saga.

      However if you let me know what kind of history (time period, region, etc) you are interested in, I can make some more specific recommendations for you, since I read a ton of historical fiction. :) Historical Literature I am less well versed in though.

      1 vote
  14. jenz
    (edited )
    Link
    I just finished the fourth and last, of the books of the Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons. And damn, it is amazing. Initially, my thoughts ran along the lines: this author is obsessed with John...

    I just finished the fourth and last, of the books of the Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons.

    And damn, it is amazing.

    Initially, my thoughts ran along the lines: this author is obsessed with John Keats, and sure he is, and I'll say this: there is way, way, way too much going on here, way too much, all in all, I guess it is silly, though amidst the gorge of thousands, ripped to pieces by the shrike so terrible, the more people hanging, suffering but living, on a spike on the "tree of pain" ─ "silly" is silly; and the story, it is amazing. In the first two books, Hyperion and the The Fall of Hyperion there's what, 7-8, 9 ─ 10 main characters that the narrator is constantly switching between? Simmons seems to enjoy writing about pain. Though in the third and fourth books, he's pretty much only going about love. Which by the way has become a primitive force of the universe, according to him, it's a bit stupid really, but what the hell isn't, which also is a point he makes.

    Nothing makes sense, they are within ruins hundreds of thousands of years old; and they're from the future? Obviously through the use of "anti-entropic fields". Well, every story has their nonsensical parts. This is Sci-Fi, this is war, or, I won't spoil. Quoting a goodread review (which gives 2 stars. Personally I'd rate it 4,5176M):

    borrowing from nearly every possible resource from Dante to Robinson Crusoe to Asimov to the Matrix to Star Trek. There are Martian Palestinian Refuge camps, time travel, backwards aging, superheros, space battles, giant trees in space, bioengineered butterfly people, androids, artificial intelligence, holodecks, crusaders, regeneration and rebirth, human sacrifice

    ─ that is, forgetting about everything, especially the countless Keats-references. And yes, that is way too much; and it is amazing, would recommend.

    It's Sci-fi, mad Sci-fi, I reckon. Good night.

    2 votes
  15. CrazyOtter
    Link
    Children of Men by P.D. James. Loved the film adaption several years ago and saw this in the library so picked it up on impulse. Only just started it but already it's quite different from the film.

    Children of Men by P.D. James.

    Loved the film adaption several years ago and saw this in the library so picked it up on impulse. Only just started it but already it's quite different from the film.

  16. [2]
    hexthree
    Link
    I've only just gotten into reading as a hobby, so I'm starting off with some popular ones: I'm partway through both The Martian and Brave New World. Both have been good! I don't have much to use...

    I've only just gotten into reading as a hobby, so I'm starting off with some popular ones: I'm partway through both The Martian and Brave New World. Both have been good! I don't have much to use as a reference, but Huxley sure can paint a picture of a world.

    1. unknown user
      Link Parent
      Hey, thanks for sharing! BTW I just posted this week's thread here, you may want to post this again over there as that's where most of the activity will be on.

      Hey, thanks for sharing! BTW I just posted this week's thread here, you may want to post this again over there as that's where most of the activity will be on.

      1 vote