9000's recent activity

  1. Comment on Would you give up flying to lower your environmental impact? in ~enviro

    9000
    Link Parent
    Given that they advertise a "luxury" experience with full sleeping room, I wonder what the per-capita carbon emissions are like for something like Cabin. I don't see it listed on their site, but...

    Given that they advertise a "luxury" experience with full sleeping room, I wonder what the per-capita carbon emissions are like for something like Cabin. I don't see it listed on their site, but it looks like they fit maybe 14 or 16 passengers into the bus (given the 1:7 ratio and each bed being 6.5 feet long)? Though, it could be as high as 20 or even 25. Still, this would be much less than a typical coach bus that can fit, which ranges anywhere from 50 to almost 90.1 But, even if they are half as efficient as a typical coach bus, Cabin should still be much more efficient than a domestic flight.2 Perhaps on par with three or four people carpooling?

    I've done a decent amount of coach travel, and I've done the SF-LA route (Cabin's only route) by both car and plane, and I can honestly say that I would not be opposed to a decent sleep coach experience for that journey. Driving for that long is really taxing, even if you have someone along who can split the load with you. Sleeping in a normal coach seat is just awful, even though it's so cheap. I have never tried Cabin, so I have no idea if they are actually any good, but I do personally see the market appeal.

    Hopefully either this service or one like it can become both environmentally efficient and popular. As @skybrian says,3 it seems like strong bus/coach networks might be more practical (at least politically) in the U.S. than high-speed rail.


    1: https://www.quora.com/How-many-seats-are-on-a-standard-private-coach-bus?share=1
    2: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49349566
    3: https://tildes.net/~enviro/pw5/would_you_give_up_flying_to_lower_your_environmental_impact#comment-580u

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Introducing Signal PINs: a method of storing some account data (profile, settings, etc.) securely on Signal servers in case you lose or switch devices in ~tech

    9000
    Link
    Is there a list anywhere of what exactly is backed up via Signal Pins and what is backed up via the normal backup method? I assume the amount of data protected by the pin is relatively small, at...

    Is there a list anywhere of what exactly is backed up via Signal Pins and what is backed up via the normal backup method? I assume the amount of data protected by the pin is relatively small, at least compared to potentially a GB or more of message backups, but does anyone know of a list that explicitly describes what is in each?

    3 votes
  3. Comment on Beaker Browser 1.0 Beta in ~tech

    9000
    Link Parent
    Yeah, this software would definitely fit! Other solutions I know of, with varying trade offs: Magic Wormhole Firefox Send FilePizza IPFS

    Yeah, this software would definitely fit!

    Other solutions I know of, with varying trade offs:

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Beaker Browser 1.0 Beta in ~tech

    9000
    Link Parent
    So, in this case, a feed is append-only1 and should never fork. Since feeds are validated by private keys, this means you can always be sure that if someone offers you a newer version, that it is...

    So, in this case, a feed is append-only1 and should never fork. Since feeds are validated by private keys, this means you can always be sure that if someone offers you a newer version, that it is in fact a newer version. Since the peers form a swarm around data, they can very quickly communicate the newest changes to each other.

    The only ways, I believe, for you to not get the most up-to-date data is either for (1) you to have no peers or be offline, but this should be obvious, or (2) for all of your peers to coordinate against you, which should be very difficult for any site with more than a few peers already.


    1: This site is an older explanation and doesn't represent the current state of the Dat ecosystem, but I believe the relevant principles still apply.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Beaker Browser 1.0 Beta in ~tech

    9000
    Link Parent
    They talk about that some in the announcement for Hyperdrive v10: But, I think this thread is much more impressive, where they show efficiently handling a site that is 255 GB!

    They talk about that some in the announcement for Hyperdrive v10:

    Importantly, drives support efficient random-access file reads, meaning that you can seek through a video and it will download only the portions of the video you're viewing, on-demand. We call this property "sparse downloading", and it's great for things like large websites (think all of Wikipedia mirrored to a drive) where readers only view single pages at a time.

    But, I think this thread is much more impressive, where they show efficiently handling a site that is 255 GB!

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Beaker Browser 1.0 Beta in ~tech

    9000
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    These are good questions! I will try to answer to the best of my ability. As far as I know, networking is usually the bottleneck, which means most of your computer's specs don't really matter...

    These are good questions! I will try to answer to the best of my ability.

    how hard is this sort of P2P on the computer hosting it? Would I need a gaming-level rig to be able to run it reliably for an unknown number of users?

    As far as I know, networking is usually the bottleneck, which means most of your computer's specs don't really matter except for bandwidth. You definitely don't need an expensive graphics card or anything (in fact, you don't need a graphics card at all). Also, each peer rehosts the site that it's looking at (and any they voluntarily choose to help), which means that as your site gets more popular, there is more collective bandwidth serving it. Think about the difference between a torrent with one dedicated peer versus a popular one with 150. You'll see a dramatic difference in download speeds without putting too much pressure on your upload.

    I think they are still working on how to best control how much of your resources are dedicated at a time, but it should be very reasonable hardware requirements.

    Also, is this something I could reliably do in parallel with mainstream server-hosted Web?

    Yes! Dat/Hypercore just deals with straight up files. Like Git, it leaves all of the files as-is, and stores all state in a dot file. You can definitely run a Hypercore daemon and an HTTP server pointed at the same files. There are even tools explicitly aimed at this dual-hosting set up1!


    1: I'm not sure if this project supports Hyperdrive v10 or not (v10 was released yesterday concurrently with the beta Beaker release), but it's managed by the same people who make Beaker: https://github.com/beakerbrowser/homebase

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Beaker Browser 1.0 Beta in ~tech

    9000
    (edited )
    Link
    The Beaker Browser uses the Hypercore protocol in addition to normal HTTP to share files. Hypercore is a peer-to-peer protocol, similar to bittorrent, but much better for sharing mutable data like...

    The Beaker Browser uses the Dat protocol Hypercore protocol in addition to normal HTTP to share files. Hypercore is a peer-to-peer protocol, similar to bittorrent, but much better for sharing mutable data like websites.

    Not needing to run a server nor depend on a tech giant to host a personal (or even popular) website is a powerful feeling, and will hopefully help reduce the strict dichotomy between producer/consumer that we see on the modern web.

    Beaker Browser is the flagship project for the Hypercore protocol. While they have been in a private beta for a while now, they just announced their public beta today. They have put a lot of effort into both the underlying tech and the UX, leading to a really cool release! I really recommend downloading it and poking around, it's hard to explain it's appeal just in words.


    EDIT: Dat -> Hypercore. They used to use Dat. It is unclear to me if Dat now uses Hypercore or if Dat has been superseded by Hypercore. Either way, I figure this is more accurate.

    8 votes
  8. Comment on 1-pixel wealth: Wealth in the United States, shown to scale in ~finance

    9000
    Link Parent
    I ended up using the arrow keys, mostly

    I ended up using the arrow keys, mostly

    2 votes
  9. Comment on What happens when a brown chef cooks white food? in ~food

    9000
    Link
    What is problematic here? Are they saying that they portrayed the restaurant as an Asian or Asian-fusion restaurant when the owner was clearly going for a mostly Italian concept, or rather that...

    "But he [Dale Talde, a Filipino chef] still faced a frustrating slant in coverage when he opened Massoni [his new Italian concept]. All the stories about the restaurant didn’t focus on the fact that he was making Italian staples like spaghetti and meatballs, but instead focused on dishes that featured the use of Asian ingredients, like the arancini made with biryani (a baked-rice dish popular in South Asia) and gnocchi made with gochujang, a fermented Korean hot sauce."

    What is problematic here? Are they saying that they portrayed the restaurant as an Asian or Asian-fusion restaurant when the owner was clearly going for a mostly Italian concept, or rather that they called it an Italian restaurant and focused their reviews on the unexpected additions to the menu? Because, I feel like those additions to the menu of an Italian restaurant are note-worthy regardless of the race of the owner. I have not read the articles in question, so I do not know if they linked the race of the chef with the influences on the food, but just the description given in this article doesn't immediately sound racist to me.

    Though, I'd be happy to hear other opinions and interpretations!

    2 votes
  10. Comment on Political discussion here seems to be really bad. Is it even possible for it to be good? in ~tildes

    9000
    Link Parent
    I mean, I'm by no means certain, no. But it seems like a pretty cheap experiment to run. If it doesn't help much, we don't have to keep using it. I try my best to post high quality comments when I...

    I mean, I'm by no means certain, no. But it seems like a pretty cheap experiment to run. If it doesn't help much, we don't have to keep using it.

    I try my best to post high quality comments when I write, but I would be lying if I said that my vote counts don't affect my confidence.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on Political discussion here seems to be really bad. Is it even possible for it to be good? in ~tildes

    9000
    Link Parent
    Could this be set up to just be a mod option? It could be seen as a lighter intervention than locking a thread, where Deimos can just turn off vote counts on individual threads that start getting...

    Could this be set up to just be a mod option? It could be seen as a lighter intervention than locking a thread, where Deimos can just turn off vote counts on individual threads that start getting feisty.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on How do you manage your ebooks & web documents? in ~tech

    9000
    Link
    I tend to just manage my ebooks with Calibre, and I suppose I don't worry too much about reading PDFs (though I, of course, keep my software up to date). I just wanted to add that...

    I tend to just manage my ebooks with Calibre, and I suppose I don't worry too much about reading PDFs (though I, of course, keep my software up to date).

    I just wanted to add that https://standardebooks.org is a great resource for high-quality ebooks, in addition to the ones you have mentioned.

    10 votes
  13. Comment on Recommend FLOSS games in ~games

    9000
    Link
    Lexica (Android) - A Boggle-like game. It's a nice relaxing word game. UnCiv (Android/Desktop) - A FLOSS reimplementation of Sid Meier's Civilization V. While it doesn't have all of the win...

    Lexica (Android) - A Boggle-like game. It's a nice relaxing word game.

    UnCiv (Android/Desktop) - A FLOSS reimplementation of Sid Meier's Civilization V. While it doesn't have all of the win conditions or DLC gameplay implemented, it is surprisingly playable and similarly addicting to the original!

    Freeciv (Desktop) - Again, a FLOSS reimplementation of Civ, though this is a much older project. It has a lot of the comlexity that UnCiv lacks, but its UX can be a bit of a barrier for a new player.

    MegaGlest (Desktop) - A Medieval RTS game. It reminded me a lot of Star Wars: Empire at War, from the days I played that. MegaGlest is missing some polish, but I definitely found it fun as well.

    Endless Sky (Desktop) - I definitely also have to echo @The-Toon's suggestion of Endless Sky! It's fun, can be played real-time or not. Has an optional plot. All-in-all, a lot of player choice and pretty graphics.

    Bonus points - Wikipedia maintains a list of open source video games, but it's not easy to determine quality from it, and it seems to mostly target desktop software.

    10 votes
  14. Comment on A real, not-clickbaity, average Chinese wet market in ~food

    9000
    Link
    The pinned comment to this video is where a lot of the meat is. It's worth a read all on its own, but in it he argues that the farmed-wildlife trade, not wet markets, are really the questionable...

    The pinned comment to this video is where a lot of the meat is. It's worth a read all on its own, but in it he argues that the farmed-wildlife trade, not wet markets, are really the questionable practice we should be discussing. While yes, the wildlife was often then sold at wet markets, the vast majority of wet markets did not participate.

    Additionally, he talks about how traditional Chinese medicine plays a large part of the demand for farmed-wildlife, and does a good job giving a nuanced take on that. Finally, he talks about changes and criticisms he thinks are in fact reasonable, which he didn't really get to in the video.

    TL;DR: Read the pinned comment on the video. It's very good (if wordy).

    7 votes
  15. Comment on Humble Conquer COVID-19 Bundle in ~games

    9000
    Link
    Give away, like others, but fewer (my game collection is smaller, it seems): Hacknet Starfinder: Pact Worlds Campaign Setting Music Maker EDM Edition + $10 voucher for in-app purchases Just reply...

    Give away, like others, but fewer (my game collection is smaller, it seems):

    • Hacknet
    • Starfinder: Pact Worlds Campaign Setting
    • Music Maker EDM Edition + $10 voucher for in-app purchases

    Just reply or DM me, and I will update the list as its given out. First come, first serve.


    I would also give away some of the books, because I either already have them or don't want them, but they're DRM-free, so I'm not sure if that counts as piracy even if I don't download them for myself and only give them to one person.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Language Design: Stop using <> for generics in ~comp

    9000
    Link Parent
    Yeah, I feel like arrays as a data structure have been pretty consistent for a really long time, and their syntax hasn't changed much? What syntax would they prefer, getters and setters? Like, I...

    Many languages used [] [... for ...] array lookup (array[0]), adding pointless complexity to the language for very little benefit – as such built-in syntax usually becomes dead weight a few years down the road, as the preferred choice of data structure implementation evolves.

    Yeah, I feel like arrays as a data structure have been pretty consistent for a really long time, and their syntax hasn't changed much? What syntax would they prefer, getters and setters?

    Like, I get the first part of their point. I just recently implemented a parser for part of the C++ spec, and yeah, there are shift/reduce conflicts when you see <<, because it's not immediately clear whether it is the bitshift operator or the opening of a nested generic. But, I've never heard anyone else complain about brackets for array look ups, especially without offering a preferred syntax.

    6 votes
  17. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    9000
    Link Parent
    I assume you mean end-to-end encryption, often abbreviated as either "E2E encryption" or "E2EE". Essentially, E2EE means that the clients handle all cryptographic operations so that only the...

    I assume you mean end-to-end encryption, often abbreviated as either "E2E encryption" or "E2EE".

    Essentially, E2EE means that the clients handle all cryptographic operations so that only the sender and receiver of a message can read it. Adding TLS is only E2EE if you consider the client and the server to be the relevant parties, but usually this is not the case. For instance, Facebook Messenger (as currently written) is not considered to be E2E encrypted, despite using TLS, because the messages are not encrypted with the recipient's key by the browser, and so the Facebook servers can see the plaintext messages. However, Signal and WhatsApp are both considered E2E encrypted, because messages are encrypted before being sent to the server at all (even if this connection to the server is protected by TLS).

    Thus, it seems like your private messaging system is not E2E encrypted. According to your link, it looks like the database encryption is applied by the server, so the person running this server (you) could still see the plaintext messages if you want. You could even forge messages from other users, if you wanted. You would also be susceptible to legal pressure, since you would be capable of reading messages.

    E2E encrypted messaging services provide a lot of privacy, but they tend to be much more difficult to implement, because all of your clients have to know the keys for all of their contacts to be able to send them messages. Additionally, the more metadata you encrypt (to be more private), the more difficult it is to run an efficient, abuse-free service.

    I hope this helps!

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Progress update on Git's migration from SHA-1 to SHA-256 in ~comp

    9000
    Link Parent
    They address a real world example where this could have happened: Essentially, the attacker could have poisoned the server's copy of floppy.c, and since HEAD's hash would still match, no one would...

    They address a real world example where this could have happened:

    The compromise of kernel.org in 2011 created a fair amount of concern about the security of the kernel source repository. If an attacker were able to put a backdoor into the kernel code, the result could be the eventual compromise of vast numbers of deployed systems.

    Essentially, the attacker could have poisoned the server's copy of floppy.c, and since HEAD's hash would still match, no one would suspect anything. Then, any clones from kernel.org would result in the poisoned file being returned, which would slowly start to poison many people's kernel repositories. Depending on where in the code base the backdoor was inserted, it could be a long time before people find the vulnerability and trace its source.

    If this were to happen on the scale of GitHub, there would be madness (though, Linux is infrastructure-critical too). They could selectively poison individual projects, or even individual developer's repositories, without any major red flags.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on At ten thousand page views a month, Tildes emits the same amount of carbon as one tree absorbs in one year in ~enviro

    9000
    Link
    According to this site, Tildes uses as much carbon in a year as a tree (whatever that metric means) absorbs in a year. Should we start a yearly tradition of planting a tree to offset our carbon?...

    According to this site, Tildes uses as much carbon in a year as a tree (whatever that metric means) absorbs in a year. Should we start a yearly tradition of planting a tree to offset our carbon? It sounds cheap enough to be doable, and like a fun tradition!

    32 votes