29 votes

Your favorite vegetarian recipes

Hi,

Where I am living we are going back into a month long lockdown, I would like to find some vegetarian recipes to cook.

I am not a Chef but I cook everyday so more advanced recipes are fine, though I also like quick wins when I don't feel like spending much time cooking.

What do you people eat when you don't want to eat meat? What are your favorite recipes?

Thanks!

33 comments

  1. [3]
    wcerfgba
    Link
    I have a bunch of recipes on my website, including my own burger recipe and a toolkit for assembling new ideas for lunch . I also started making chana dal according to this recipe (other site)...

    I have a bunch of recipes on my website, including my own burger recipe and a toolkit for assembling new ideas for lunch . I also started making chana dal according to this recipe (other site) which I really like -- healthy, delicious and simple.

    6 votes
    1. Thra11
      Link Parent
      Give it a try when you have time! I started making my own houmous last year. Takes a little bit of trial and error to get a nice balance of flavourings that you like, but otherwise it's super easy...

      Some composite sauces I don’t have recipes for yet and/or which you might be able to buy ready-made from the shops:

      • Houmous

      Give it a try when you have time! I started making my own houmous last year. Takes a little bit of trial and error to get a nice balance of flavourings that you like, but otherwise it's super easy and there's plenty of scope for experimenting with different flavours. Aside from the flavour, I find it quite convenient to make at home because most of the main ingredients (tinned or dried chickpeas, tahini, etc.) keep for ages, whereas the pre-made stuff generally has a fairly short best-before date and doesn't keep long once opened. By making it at home, I can buy a large stock of ingredients at once, and just use small amounts as and when I feel like having houmous.

      Love the website btw, will have to give some of your recipes a go myself!

      1 vote
    2. simao
      Link Parent
      Will look into your recipes, lots there look good, also the toolkit. What is your favorite meal you cooked with that toolkit? I sometimes cook this chana masala from serious eats It's a lot of...

      Will look into your recipes, lots there look good, also the toolkit. What is your favorite meal you cooked with that toolkit?

      I sometimes cook this chana masala from serious eats It's a lot of work but it's really worth it.

      1 vote
  2. [2]
    Eabryt
    Link
    Since @wcerfgba already posted links to their blog, I'll include some links to my girlfriends blog. It's totally vegan, so slightly different than what you're asking, but still delicious. There's...

    Since @wcerfgba already posted links to their blog, I'll include some links to my girlfriends blog. It's totally vegan, so slightly different than what you're asking, but still delicious.

    There's a yummy hummus recipe which isn't too difficult and will make plenty of it!

    I'm also a huge fan of her cajun-braised jackfruit and especially her tofu pad thai

    If you have any questions about the recipes or vegan food in general, I've got the inside line to the author so just let me know!

    6 votes
    1. simao
      Link Parent
      thanks for sharing, the photos look good!

      thanks for sharing, the photos look good!

      1 vote
  3. patience_limited
    Link
    Mushroom Risotto! It takes some work, but it's an incredibly comforting dish in the deep mid-winter. You don't have to use super-expensive wild mushrooms for the whole dish; I usually use 2/3...

    Mushroom Risotto! It takes some work, but it's an incredibly comforting dish in the deep mid-winter. You don't have to use super-expensive wild mushrooms for the whole dish; I usually use 2/3 cremini and 1/3 shiitakes.

    6 votes
  4. [2]
    autumn
    Link
    Beans (black is my preferred variety) and rice are a good place to start. I like to add pan-fried sweet potatoes, avocado, and some salsa for a full meal. Maybe even some Greek yogurt. I call...

    Beans (black is my preferred variety) and rice are a good place to start. I like to add pan-fried sweet potatoes, avocado, and some salsa for a full meal. Maybe even some Greek yogurt. I call these “garbage bowls.”

    6 votes
    1. 9000
      Link Parent
      I have been so surprised by how good a nice bowl of rice and beans is, considering it's one of the cheapest meals I make. It doesn't take much effort, just some garlic and onion powder, to give it...

      I have been so surprised by how good a nice bowl of rice and beans is, considering it's one of the cheapest meals I make. It doesn't take much effort, just some garlic and onion powder, to give it flavor. If you want to get a little fancy, you can sauté real garlic and onion (and any other spices you want) in a pot, add in the dry rice and sauté them together for a moment, then add the water straight in to make the rice. Really adds some good flavor to it.

      5 votes
  5. krg
    Link
    Sauté mushrooms and shallots with some fat (e.g. oil or butter) + sherry + some herbs (e.g. thyme and/or sage). Basically, this recipe. Though, I never go through the trouble of removing the...

    Sauté mushrooms and shallots with some fat (e.g. oil or butter) + sherry + some herbs (e.g. thyme and/or sage). Basically, this recipe. Though, I never go through the trouble of removing the shallots.

    For extra fun, make a béchamel out of it by adding some flour and some milk/milk-alternative. My preference would be to serve over mashed potatoes. Or, mix in some meat-alternative sausage and serve it with biscuits in the morning. But you can serve it over a shoe, if need be. It's a damn good gravy!

    4 votes
  6. reifyresonance
    Link
    My time has come! Most of the recipes below are defined by a special ingredient or two, something you might not've used before. This is my way of keeping things interesting and expanding my...

    My time has come! Most of the recipes below are defined by a special ingredient or two, something you might not've used before. This is my way of keeping things interesting and expanding my repertoire, it may not be for you.

    Absolutely love Vegetarian mapo tofu. Can use any mushrooms. I omit the fermented black beans because I haven't found them yet (and the original version of this recipe didn't call for them), use any and all types of mushrooms (any oysters work great, and it's probably not traditional but I kinda like adding enoki?), use 2tbsp corn starch, and soak the tofu in salt water ~12m instead of blanching (what the original version of this recipe called for.) Special ingredients: sichuan peppercorns (may have to buy online like me), and doubanjiang (should be able to find at any asian grocery store).

    Red Lentil Soup w/ North African Spices is maybe the best soup I've ever had. It's from the Mediterranean America's Test Kitchen cookbook, iirc. I found a video that's almost what I do - but I use extra virgin olive oil instead of butter, and cook it for 5 minutes at high pressure in an instant pot (quick pressure release - also a normal pressure cooker should work fine) instead of 15 minutes on the stove. Also - for all the spices you have whole (cumin, coriander, cinnamon stick), toast them in a dry pan on medium heat until fragrant, then grind in a spice grinder or mortar/pestle after letting cool. Special Ingredients: red lentils. I found these at a middle eastern grocery store, but you should be able to find them at an indian store as well. Or maybe your normal grocery store is fancy enough! Brown lentils will not work for this.

    Vegetarian Gumbo is pretty great. "But reifyresonance", you say, "isn't gumbo defined by meat and seafood, two decidedly non-vegetarian things?" Actually, it's defined by the okra! Here's my ingredients list - it's still a work in progress mind you. I think this recipe takes the cake for "most kinds of capsicum" in a recipe. It's a bitch and you have to make a roux, but you can make a huge amount and freeze it. Feel free to add celery - I ditched it because my partner dislikes it. Special ingredients: file powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves). I found some zatarains brand at harris teeter in the spice aisle, but it was not easy to locate.

    Ingredience 1 serrano pepper 1 banana pepper 1 jalepeno pepper

    1/4 cup oil
    1/4 cup AP flour

    2 tbsp oil
    1 lg onion, chopped
    3 bell peppers, red/green mix
    1qt vegetable broth
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 tbsp cajun seasoning (make your own, it's easy and goes on everything)
    1 tbsp smoked paprika
    1 tsp liquid smoke (could be omitted, I guess)
    1 tsp soy sauce or bragg's liquid aminos

    Begin optional section:
    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    1 tsp red pepper flakes
    1/2 tsp hot sauce
    ??? celery seed
    ??? apple cider vinegar
    ??? bay leaf
    End optional section

    1 can fire roasted tomatoes
    1 sweet potato, peeled/cubed
    1 parsnip, peeled/cubed (it's like if a carrot were a potato!)
    throw some mushrooms in if ya feelin it
    1 cup canned red beans, rinsed/drained
    1 cup black-eyed peas, rinsed/drained
    Note: last time I made this I resolved to add more beans. Not sure if doubling would be too much.
    3 cups sliced okra

    1 tbsp gumbo file powder, plus extra for serving

    Recipe Preheat oven to broil. Arrange chile peppers on baking sheet. place in oven until skins blacken, 4-5m. rotate until all sides blackened. remove from oven, place in paper bag. after 15-20m, peel skin, remove stems/seeds, chop.

    make a roux. look this one up - I followed the directions I have written and burned mine. use lower than medium heat, and not whole wheat flour. also be extremely careful to not burn yourself.

    put 2tbsp oil in soup pot over m/h. add 1/2 of the onions and bell peppers, until onion transparent, ~5m. stir 1/4 cup vegetable broth in, cover, simmer until almost all gone, 10-15m.

    add chile peppers, rest of onions/bells, garlic, all seasonings and spices. cover, simmer 5m. add tomatoes, potatoes, parsnip, beans, okra, remaining stock. simmer uncovered 30m. season w/ salt/pepper.

    stir in file powder OFF HEAT just before serving with jasmine rice, green onions, file powder.

    Oh no, we've actually been vegan! Time for perhaps my favorite, if rather labor-intensive recipe - Israeli Eggplant and Egg Sandwiches. Seriously, try this, it's severely god-tier. This one has 3 sub-recipes (if you make your own hummus - which you should.) Also from ATK mediterranian. This gem of a recipe is what sold me on America's Test Kitchen, and I will be slowly working through the rest of their cookbooks. Special ingredients: Aleppo pepper. Not essential, but suggested highly. Found at middle eastern grocery store as a turkish "pul biber". Can sub red pepper flakes/cayanne mixture.

    Tahini yogurt sauce makes twice as much as you need for the recipe. still good tho.

    1/3 cup tahini
    1/3 cup plain greek yogurt
    1/4 cup water
    3 tbsp lemon juice
    1 clove garlic, minced.
    salt/pepper.

    whisk together, let sit 30m. refrigerate up to 4 days.

    Green zhoug makes 1/2 cup. suggest doubling because it's really good.

    6tbsp evoo
    1/2tsp ground coriander
    1/4tsp ground cumin
    1/4tsp ground cardamom
    1/4tsp salt
    pinch ground cloves
    3/4 cup cilantro leaves
    1/2c fresh parsley leaves
    2 green thai chiles, stemmed/chopped. (can sub serranos, spice it to taste)
    2 garlic cloves, minced

    microwave oil, salt, and spices until fragrant, ~30s. let cool to room temp.

    pulse spiced oil and rest of ingredients in food processor until forms coarse paste, ~15 pulses, scraping down sides as needed. refrigerate up to 4 days. (I used my electric herb grinder, it works okay but a food processor would be best.)

    Hummus makes ~2c

    1/4c water
    3tbsp lemon juice
    6tbsp tahini (tahini is expensive, so mess around with substituting some of it with a much smaller amount of sesame oil - ratio TBD)
    2tbsp evoo
    1 can chickpeas (15oz) (I always make from dry - rinse and sort, pressure cook 1lb chickpeas + 6c water 45m, natural release 15m. makes 6c wet. can also soak 8h, cook 15m - but I don't have notes on how well this time works.)
    1 small garlic clove, minced
    1/2 tsp salt (more if you are a salt FIEND like I)
    1/2 tsp ground cumin
    1/8 tsp cayenne

    combine water, lemon juice in small bowl. in other bowl, whisk tahini and oil.

    process chickpeas, garlic, salt, cumin, cayenne in food processor (I use blender) until almost fully ground, ~15s. scrape down sides of bowl. w/ machine running - add lemon juice mixture in steady stream. scrape down sides of bowl and process 1m. w/ machine running - add tahini mixture in steady stream, process until smooth, ~15s.

    transfer to bowl. let sit room temp 30m. refrigerate up to 5 days. can loosen w/ warm water for serving.

    The damn recipe itself makes enough for 4 people. not 4 servings - 4 people. can save extra tomato salad and eggplant in fridge for next day.

    2tbsp evoo
    1lb eggplant, sliced in 1/2 inch thick rounds (if you're like me - get a ruler. estimating wrong will not go well.)

    (tomato salad ingredients)
    2tbsp evoo
    8oz cherry tomatoes, quartered
    1/2 c finely chopped dill pickles (trust me here - they're essential and great)
    1/4 c finely chopped red onion
    1/4c frsh parsley leaves
    1tbsp lemon juice
    1 garlic clove, chopped

    4 8-inch pita breads
    1c hummus
    6 hard-cooked eggs (do you own an egg cooker? I suggest an egg cooker. got one at the thrift store for like, $2. so much better than boiling a massive pot of water every time)
    1/2c tahini-yogurt sauce
    1/2c green zhoug
    1tsp ground dried aleppo pepper

    spread eggplant on baking sheet lined w/paper towels, sprinkle both sides w/ 2tsp salt, let sit 30m.
    adjust oven rack 4in from broiler, heat broiler.

    pat eggplant dry thoroughly. arrange on foil-lined sheet (don't use silicone baking sheets here oops) in single layer, brush both sides w/ 1tbsp oil per side. broil until spotty brown, ~5m/side

    combine salad ingredients in bowl. salt/pepper to taste.

    use large plates - this one is messy. on each plate, a pita. on each pita: 1/4c hummus, eggplant, then egg (sliced), then tomato salad, then tahini-yogurt sauce, then zhoug, then aleppo pepper. (I also have been throwing on some sumac and I think I like it?)

    serve immediately.

    I feel a little typed out after all that. I'll echo others' chana masala recs. I've got a complicated recipe with all kinds of fancy spices, but the simple one is 80% as good and a bit less work and cost. A few tips: grate your onion and ginger, use cumin seeds roasted and ground instead of powdered cumin, start from dry chickpeas, and serve with an accompaniment of 1/2 small onion, diced, 1 small (roma-sized) tomato diced, 1 Serrano sliced into thin rings, and juice of 1 lime mixed. If you feel like you want a Special Ingredient get some hing (asafoetida). Store it in multiple airtight layers.

    Also, palak paneer is great, or dal palak. (palak being spinach, paneer being those cheese cubes, and dal being any of a variety of lentils - I see tur dal and masoor dal in my recipe) I've also gotten into making idlis, which are steamed fermented rice and lentil cakes. Can post the recipe if others want. Requires a bit of an investment - you need a stand to cook them in. Also a special kind of rice and dal, and fenugreek seeds. Goes well w/ scrambled eggs and palak anything.

    Non-recipe suggestion - save vegetable and mushroom scraps in bags in the freezer, and make stock with them. Onion skins too, and any veg in the fridge about to go bad.

    4 votes
  7. [3]
    nukeman
    (edited )
    Link
    Where are you located? Some of my suggestions require things that aren’t always available. Edit: a simple thing I like to make is hot chocolate. Warm milk of your choice (soy for me), cocoa...

    Where are you located? Some of my suggestions require things that aren’t always available.

    Edit: a simple thing I like to make is hot chocolate. Warm milk of your choice (soy for me), cocoa powder, chocolate chips, sugar, vanilla, and any spices or alcohol you’d like to add. Per cup, 1 table spoon of sugar, 1 of cocoa powder, 1.5-2 of chocolate chips, and about a teaspoon of vanilla. Whisk then serve.

    3 votes
    1. [2]
      simao
      Link Parent
      I am in Lisbon, Portugal right now. I went to a asian food store recently though so I am stocked up on some asian food staples.

      I am in Lisbon, Portugal right now. I went to a asian food store recently though so I am stocked up on some asian food staples.

      3 votes
      1. nukeman
        Link Parent
        Ah okay. One thing I make is grits with vegan sausages. Somehow I don’t think they’d have grits in Portugal, although you might be able to grab some polenta. My go-to Asian food is tofu, peas, and...

        Ah okay. One thing I make is grits with vegan sausages. Somehow I don’t think they’d have grits in Portugal, although you might be able to grab some polenta.

        My go-to Asian food is tofu, peas, and rice with boxed Japanese curry.

        1 vote
  8. [3]
    9000
    Link
    If you want something low effort, I've found this black bean and pumpkin chilli recipe very tasty, and it all just cooks in a slow cooker. Between the pumpkin and the spices, it really smells and...

    If you want something low effort, I've found this black bean and pumpkin chilli recipe very tasty, and it all just cooks in a slow cooker. Between the pumpkin and the spices, it really smells and tastes like autumn. If you do make it, I highly recommend the suggestion to add some raw avocado to your bowl. It really changes the flavor, but for the better!

    3 votes
    1. simao
      Link Parent
      Black beans are my favorite beans, and that looks like the black bean and avocado bowl the hipster cafe around me sells, so I will definitely try it.

      Black beans are my favorite beans, and that looks like the black bean and avocado bowl the hipster cafe around me sells, so I will definitely try it.

      2 votes
    2. emdash
      Link Parent
      That black bean and pumpkin chili looks awesome. Definitely trying that this week, thanks.

      That black bean and pumpkin chili looks awesome. Definitely trying that this week, thanks.

      2 votes
  9. cfabbro
    (edited )
    Link
    I don't have any recipes for them, since I have never made the dishes myself, but the Eritrean/Ethiopian restaurant I used to go to in Toronto had some truly mindblowing vegetarian dishes....

    I don't have any recipes for them, since I have never made the dishes myself, but the Eritrean/Ethiopian restaurant I used to go to in Toronto had some truly mindblowing vegetarian dishes. However, My Name Is Andong just released a video recipe for Shiro Wat, a vegetarian (or vegan, if you remove the butter) Ethiopian dish which I have had and enjoyed before. So I'm definitely going to give his recipe a try for myself at some point soon, since his recipes are usually solid, and it's been ages since I last had Eritrean/Ethiopian food. Now I just need to find a good recipe for injera (the fermented, spongy flatbread that goes along with most E/E meals) and I'm all set.

    3 votes
  10. [2]
    CALICO
    Link
    Shakshuka – Say It With Me Now. Eggs poached in a (not too) spicy tomato-pepper sauce. video format Cheap, basic, delicious, and hearty. I've made it with pocket money. I've made it hungover. I've...

    Shakshuka – Say It With Me Now. Eggs poached in a (not too) spicy tomato-pepper sauce.
    video format

    Cheap, basic, delicious, and hearty.
    I've made it with pocket money. I've made it hungover. I've made it a million times, with a million little variations, and it hasn't failed me yet.

    2 votes
    1. jzimbel
      Link Parent
      A slightly simpler but similar version that I love (and have made many times) is eggs in purgatory! Really delicious with the suggested lemon-rubbed toast, but also with cheesy grits/polenta if...

      A slightly simpler but similar version that I love (and have made many times) is eggs in purgatory! Really delicious with the suggested lemon-rubbed toast, but also with cheesy grits/polenta if you have time to make that.

      There’s a video recipe as well but it’s on the Bon Appetit YouTube channel, so you may or may not want to give them your viewership given what came to light over this summer...

      1 vote
  11. [3]
    aditya
    Link
    Indian cuisine has a lot of absolutely delicious vegetarian food - a significant number of Indians are vegetarians. A lot of things are actually reasonably straightforward. A great and easy recipe...

    Indian cuisine has a lot of absolutely delicious vegetarian food - a significant number of Indians are vegetarians. A lot of things are actually reasonably straightforward. A great and easy recipe that a lot of students make for example is: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/236564/chana-masala-savory-indian-chick-peas/

    If Indian food is your thing, I'm happy to think of other easy/quick recipes!

    2 votes
    1. [2]
      simao
      Link Parent
      Yes!! Indian is one of my favorite cuisines, so if you have more favorites please suggest! Thank you!

      Yes!! Indian is one of my favorite cuisines, so if you have more favorites please suggest! Thank you!

      2 votes
      1. aditya
        Link Parent
        Yikes! Apologies for the slow response, I've been rather occupied with things. I hope I'm not too late for the lockdown and you're still able to get supplies. Most Indian curries you hear about...

        Yikes! Apologies for the slow response, I've been rather occupied with things.

        I hope I'm not too late for the lockdown and you're still able to get supplies.

        Most Indian curries you hear about are typically from the Northern part of the country. I hail from the south where the cuisine is quite different. But also, a good curry isn't hard to make at all, and you can usually make something that's good and healthy with practically any vegetable. My go-to usually includes bell peppers, cottage cheese (paneer), mushrooms etc (really, it can be anything) cooked separately from the curry base. I make that by frying some onions with cumin seeds and ginger-garlic paste, then adding a tomato puree and a bunch of spices - chilli powder, garam masala (in moderation - this is honestly great to have for most simple recipes), turmeric. I also use yogurt to thicken it up a bit and then mix in the vegetables I cooked separately. We eat this with rotis or rice, depending on how we're feeling that day.

        Now this is quite Indian, so I'm also finding some recipes that are more westernised.

        https://olivemagazine.production.wcp.imdserve.com/recipes/vegan/jersey-royal-bombay-potatoes/

        https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/vegan/maharashtrian-amti-dahl/ - most dal (lentils) dishes are absolutely delicious and ridiculously easy to make. They go well with rotis and rice.

        https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/entertain/vegetable-and-paneer-dum-biryani/ - more work than the average dish, but I adore biryani.

        Apologies again for the delay, let me know if you get a chance to try any of these out! Always excited to introduce people to the cuisine, though I'm far from an expert. Stay safe!

        3 votes
  12. jzimbel
    Link
    This is more of a dessert than a meal, but if you’re looking for something fun and own a stand mixer, you can make meringues from the liquid in a can of chickpeas—“aquafaba”! I’ve done this recipe...

    This is more of a dessert than a meal, but if you’re looking for something fun and own a stand mixer, you can make meringues from the liquid in a can of chickpeas—“aquafaba”!

    I’ve done this recipe a few times and they usually come out great. You can add a bit of cocoa powder along with the vanilla extract to make them chocolatey; just limit it to around 2 tsp or else the fat in the cocoa will destabilize it and you’ll get something closer to flat crisps than the desired melt-in-your-mouth puffs.

    2 votes
  13. DMBuce
    Link
    I've been getting into cooking a lot now that I'm trying to avoid fast food post-COVID. Here's some of the recipes I've enjoyed most so far. Some of these include meat but shouldn't be too hard to...

    I've been getting into cooking a lot now that I'm trying to avoid fast food post-COVID. Here's some of the recipes I've enjoyed most so far. Some of these include meat but shouldn't be too hard to adapt to be vegetarian.

    I tried J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's Broccoli Cheese Soup recipe recently and it's pretty good.

    A while back I pickled some peppers for the first time. I didn't really have any plan for how I would use them but after a few failed experiments, found out they taste amazing on nachos.

    There's a few mac & cheese recipes I've seen where you build the sauce in the pot with the noodles, with no need to strain them or build a roux. The basic technique is to put 1.5C milk and 1.5C water in a pot, bring to a simmer, add 16oz pasta, cook until al dente, turn off the heat, then mix in 3-4C shredded cheese. In addition to trying different kinds of pasta and cheeses, you can adapt the recipe a lot by adding spices, boiling frozen veggies with the pasta, sautéing fresh veggies in the pot before adding the liquids, etc.

    I love how easy it is to make chili. The basic recipe I use is to dice an onion (and sauté it with some beef in my case, but that's not at all necessary), toss it in a slow cooker with 2 cans of beans, 1-2 cans of tomatoes, optionally 1 can of corn, cumin, chili powder, other spices to taste, then cook on low 6-8 hours or high 5-6 hours. For "other spices" I usually reach for a generic spice blend called Mrs. Dash Original plus oregano, cayenne, sriracha, and honey. There's a few different ways I like to adapt the recipe. Add 2C water at the beginning, 16oz pasta at the end, cook on low for another 30mins, optionally add some cheese and you have Chili Mac. Or thicken it with some flour at the end, cook another 30mins on low, and you have a great burrito filling, chip dip, or nacho topping.

    Yesterday I tried Chef John's Korean Street Toast recipe and it was delicious. I haven't tried it without the ham but its flavor didn't seem crucial to the dish so I'm sure it would taste just as great without.

    I also really like his technique for making rice, e.g. in his Spicy Tomato Rice. The recipe includes chicken stock but you could probably substitute it out for veggie stock or water. And it's really easy to adapt for different flavor profiles. So far I've done it more Korean style (with onion, green onions, zucchini, Gochujang sauce, kimchi, carrots, green peppers, garlic) and Cajun style (maybe not as useful since it includes meat, but: celery, onion, green pepper, paprika, cayenne, oregano, worcestershire, and some combination of bacon/sausage/chicken/shrimp). I'm planning on trying it with Indian spices & veggies next.

    2 votes
  14. [4]
    teaearlgraycold
    Link
    I really like making crispy tofu stirfry with gochujang sauce. I add tons of mushrooms, peppers, and bok choy. Serve with brown jasmine and you’ll be full for the rest of the day.

    I really like making crispy tofu stirfry with gochujang sauce. I add tons of mushrooms, peppers, and bok choy. Serve with brown jasmine and you’ll be full for the rest of the day.

    1 vote
    1. [3]
      simao
      Link Parent
      Any tips on making the tofu actually crispy? I can get good results with corn starch but never as good as some restaurants.

      Any tips on making the tofu actually crispy? I can get good results with corn starch but never as good as some restaurants.

      1 vote
      1. psi
        Link Parent
        I'd be interested in what other people recommend, but a game changer for my partner and me was freezing/thawing firm tofu (buy tofu -> stick in freezer for several hours -> move back to...

        I'd be interested in what other people recommend, but a game changer for my partner and me was freezing/thawing firm tofu (buy tofu -> stick in freezer for several hours -> move back to refrigerator until needed). Freezing/thawing the tofu gives it a "meatier" texture, so to speak, which in my opinion greatly improves the texture.

        1 vote
      2. teaearlgraycold
        Link Parent
        I usually don't do this because I'm sure it's less healthy, but you can double fry tofu for extra crisp. Apply corn starch -> Deep fry -> Apply corn starch -> Deep fry And of course more sauce...

        I usually don't do this because I'm sure it's less healthy, but you can double fry tofu for extra crisp.

        Apply corn starch -> Deep fry -> Apply corn starch -> Deep fry

        And of course more sauce will reduce crispiness.

        It seems you're already doing this correctly, but I also recommend corn starch over potato starch for maximum crisp.

        1 vote
  15. [2]
    soks_n_sandals
    Link
    If you like cookbooks, the book Mississippi Vegan is loaded with good recipes. I say this a meat-eating Southerner. My partner has made a number of dishes from this book, and the dishes that are a...

    If you like cookbooks, the book Mississippi Vegan is loaded with good recipes. I say this a meat-eating Southerner. My partner has made a number of dishes from this book, and the dishes that are a vegan version of Southern dishes are all pretty close in flavor to the meaty analogs. If you just want vegetarian and not vegan, many recipes can be made non-vegan easily by adding butter or creams where necessary. One of our favorites is a peanut stew, which I can send the recipe for later after work.

    1 vote
    1. simao
      Link Parent
      You are not the first person to suggest this book, seems I really have to look into it. The disadvantage is I don't know what Southern food is supposed to taste like. Thanks!

      You are not the first person to suggest this book, seems I really have to look into it. The disadvantage is I don't know what Southern food is supposed to taste like. Thanks!

      2 votes
  16. psi
    Link
    Here's an easy dessert I make occasionally. Moo-less chocolate pie Ingredients 13 oz (~1 bag) of semi-sweet chocolate chips A tsp vanilla extract 1 block (~1 lb) silken tofu 1 tbsp honey Pie crust...

    Here's an easy dessert I make occasionally.

    Moo-less chocolate pie
    Ingredients
    13 oz (~1 bag) of semi-sweet chocolate chips
    A tsp vanilla extract
    1 block (~1 lb) silken tofu
    1 tbsp honey
    Pie crust

    Instructions

    1. Fill a pot with water and bring to a simmer (not boiling). Float a metal bowl on top.
    2. Melt chocolate chips in metal bowl, stirring occasionally.
    3. Combine ingredients in a blender. Pour into pie crust.
    4. Optionally, spread whipped cream on top (recipe below).

    Whipped cream

    Ingredients
    1 tbsp* sugar
    1 cup of chilled heavy cream
    1 tsp* cinnamon (optional)

    * This might be too much. Just add a bit at a time and adjust as needed.

    Instructions

    1. Combine ingredients in a blender. Mix until the cream holds its own shape.

    Note: if the heavy cream isn't chilled beforehand, the cream will remain watery.

    References

    1 vote
  17. ultrageranium
    Link
    Not a recipe, but a vegetarian cookbook that's really worth getting if you're vegetarian or not: https://www.chroniclebooks.com/products/plenty Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi. I think that's the only...

    Not a recipe, but a vegetarian cookbook that's really worth getting if you're vegetarian or not:

    https://www.chroniclebooks.com/products/plenty

    Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi. I think that's the only cookbook I own where I cooked more than 2/3 of the recipes, and keep coming back to them, over and over again. Really excellent stuff. Don't get the sequel though Plenty More, because even though there are a couple of equally good recipes, it's not as impressive as a whole.

    1 vote
  18. grahamiam
    (edited )
    Link
    Some good comments on tofu : https://tildes.net/~food/se6/anyone_who_says_tofu_is_bland_or_boring_hasnt_eaten_mapo_tofu_the_intoxicatingly_spicy_fragrant I've been 95% vegetarian for twelve years...

    Some good comments on tofu : https://tildes.net/~food/se6/anyone_who_says_tofu_is_bland_or_boring_hasnt_eaten_mapo_tofu_the_intoxicatingly_spicy_fragrant

    I've been 95% vegetarian for twelve years now - I take a break if we're traveling to a new place or if we're doing something like going to a friend's family gathering. When I want a new recipe, I generally stick to Serious Eats and NYTimes - I find those to be the only consistently good places for my taste. However, if you want a solid cookbook that does vegetarian versions of dishes most Americans would be familiar with, I think the best one is The Veganomicon.

    This soup is so good and so popular that it basically became a meme. Highly recommend trying it, if you haven't : https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1019772-spiced-chickpea-stew-with-coconut-and-turmeric

    1 vote