DMBuce's recent activity

  1. Comment on When orcs were real - The ancient struggle for homo sapiens to rule the Earth in ~humanities

    DMBuce
    Link
    Saw some red flags in this article and digging deeper for a few minutes just raised more. Not really interested in pulling on that thread any further, but I think this comment from the article is...

    Saw some red flags in this article and digging deeper for a few minutes just raised more. Not really interested in pulling on that thread any further, but I think this comment from the article is worth highlighting:

    The comments on this article I'm linking below go on for ten years. This is not a new theory, and it is not widely accepted in part because we know a lot more about neanderthals than we did in 2010. They were very much human like us. https://blog.waikato.ac.nz/bioblog/2010/10/killer-neandertals-does-this-o/

    6 votes
  2. What helps keep you off social media?

    Over the past couple years I've transitioned from spending far too much time on Reddit, to spending not as much but still too much time on Tildes instead, to spending much less time on Tildes and...

    Over the past couple years I've transitioned from spending far too much time on Reddit, to spending not as much but still too much time on Tildes instead, to spending much less time on Tildes and a reasonable amount of time reading stuff from https://longform.org/ and https://www.theflipside.io/ .

    I've found that these two sites (well, a site and an email subscription) respect my time, don't try to monopolize my focus, and provide decently nuanced info rather than outrage-inducing clickbait. They also don't have comments, which means I never get that feeling of needing to correct random internet users and get drawn into their nonsense.

    I'm wondering if there are others internet spaces that people find similarly useful in curbing their social media consumption.

    And more generally, I'm wondering what other, non-internet things help keep people off social media.

    As an example of the latter, lately I've been trying to get into the habit of going to the park after work and eating dinner there while reading a book instead of scrolling through Tildes comments or watching mindless youtube videos while I eat.

    20 votes
  3. Comment on Truth and Native American epistemology in ~humanities

    DMBuce
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I am neither a Native American nor a philosopher, but a white American man who got curious about Native American and other Indigenous worldviews and read a few (maybe a little more than a few)...

    I am neither a Native American nor a philosopher, but a white American man who got curious about Native American and other Indigenous worldviews and read a few (maybe a little more than a few) things to try to understand. So take what I say with a huge shaker of salt. I have a very tenuous grasp on this stuff compared to Native American scholars who have lived experiences to draw upon.

    That said, I think it's worth pointing out that for a long time, and in many contexts today, what's called "Philosophy" or "Epistemology" is actually Western Philosophy and Western Epistemology, and the Western philosophical tradition did not / does not recognize Indigenous philosophies or Indigenous ways of knowing ("ways of knowing" is more or less another way of saying "epistemology" btw). And in cases where Indigenous ways of knowing are recognized, they are not given equal footing with Western epistemology.

    For example, when I went to college, if you wanted to learn about Native American philosophy, there was a single course you could take through the American Indian Studies department. By contrast, there was an entire department devoted to Philosophy that dealt almost exclusively with the Western philosophical tradition. So while classes in the (Western) Philosophy department could devote an entire semester to a given topic from the Western tradition, all the various and diverse Native American cultures' philosophies had to be compressed into a single course.

    It should go without saying, but this is problematic because the Western world doesn't have a monopoly on complex thought regarding the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence -- i.e., philosophical thought. Native American and other Indigenous cultures have their own philosophical traditions and ways of knowing that developed over thousands of years. That development happened simultaneously and independently of Western schools of thought, it was informed by non-Western values, and their philosophies are just as complex as ours.

    The problem is that, due things like colonialism and settler bias, those philosophies and ways of knowing were and are often suppressed and/or overlooked. The result is that indigenous philosophies aren't seen as serious areas of study worthy of scholarship, and are often relegated to separate, underfunded Indigenous Studies departments who are tasked with teaching many different social sciences from an Indigenous perspective, while those same social sciences get their own departments devoted to teaching the Western perspective. My limited understanding is that this is changing and improving, but we still have a long way to go.

    Another outcome of colonialism and settler bias is papers like this one published in 2001, which is aimed at an audience of mostly Western philosophers, many of whom are/were largely unaware of these issues and largely unaware of their own Western biases. So I think that the paper paints a picture in broad strokes in order to simplify things for a Western audience.

    At the same time, I think there really are some commonalities among many Native American ways of knowing that are not shared by Western epistemology. As I said before, Native American cultures developed together for thousands of years, independently of Western cultures. Those cultures are not a monolith, but I don't think it's that weird to suggest that their cultures exchanged ideas throughout that time, and that their philosophies share some things in common with each other. Those commonalities can be acknowledged while at the same time acknowledging the incredible diversity of the various Native American cultures, each with their own particular ways of knowing. In the paper, Lee Hester expresses this better than I can when he says:

    Throughout this paper, I will use terms like ‘Native American’ or ‘Indian’ as if my conclusions are readily applicable to the peoples of all the sovereign Indian Nations. This is not necessarily true, though I do think there are many similarities from nation to nation. As Viola Cordova has said, any Native American has more in common with any other Native American than with any non-Indian.

    Perhaps there are other factors that I'm not considering due to my own lack of knowledge, and/or my own Western biases, that contribute to the paper's "Native American" vs. "Western" framing. I have found many such biases within myself while exploring Indigenous epistemologies, and it wouldn't surprise me to find many more. So again, this is just my limited understanding.

    Is it really true that all Amerindians [...]

    I don't think that the paper claims to speak for all Native Americans. See Lee's quote above, and also Jim Cheney's introduction, where he defers to Lee's worldview, points out his own lack of authority on such a worldview, and claims that his own perspective merely "peeks into Native American worlds, gleaning small understandings as best I can."

    3 votes
  4. Comment on We’ve barely explored the darkest realm of the ocean. With rare-metal mining on the rise, we’re already destroying it. in ~enviro

    DMBuce
    Link Parent
    Also, That's so metal.

    Also,

    A team of Japanese scientists recently reported that one deep-dwelling amphipod, Hirondellea gigas, protects its shell by coating it in an aluminum-based gel, produced from metal that it extracts from seafloor mud.

    Chrysomallon squamiferum, commonly referred to as the scaly-foot snail, is a mollusk that’s been found at vents in the Indian Ocean, at a depth of ten thousand feet. It’s the only animal known to build its shell with iron, and around its foot it sports a fringe of iron plates that looks a bit like a flamenco skirt.

    That's so metal.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on We’ve barely explored the darkest realm of the ocean. With rare-metal mining on the rise, we’re already destroying it. in ~enviro

    DMBuce
    Link

    Proponents of deep-sea mining argue that the sooner it starts the better. Manufacturing wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar panels, and batteries for energy storage requires resources, often scarce ones. [...] “The reality is that the clean-energy transition is not possible without taking billions of tons of metal from the planet,” Gerard Barron, the chairman of the Metals Company, one of the businesses that holds permits from the I.S.A., observed a few months ago. Seafloor nodules, he said, “offer a way to dramatically reduce” the environmental impact of extracting these tons.

    But seabed mining poses environmental hazards of its own. The more scientists learn about the depths, the more extraordinary the discoveries. The ocean floor is populated by creatures that thrive under conditions that seem impossibly extreme. There is, for example, a ghostly pale deep-sea octopus that lays its eggs only on the stalks of nodule-dwelling sponges. Remove the nodules in order to melt them down and it will, presumably, take millions of years for new ones to form.

    Scales, like Widder, worries that the bottom of the ocean will be wrecked before many of the most marvellous creatures living there are even identified. “The frontier story has always been one of destruction and loss,” she writes. “It is naïve to assume that the process would play out any differently in the deep.” Indeed, she argues, the depths are particularly ill-suited to disturbance because, owing to a scarcity of food, creatures tend to grow and reproduce extremely slowly. “Vital habitat is created by corals and sponges that live for millennia,” she writes.

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Truth and Native American epistemology in ~humanities

    DMBuce
    Link

    The topic ‘Truth and Native American Epistemology’ is a grand one. One which I undoubtedly do not have all the ‘answers’ to, and maybe don’t have any answers to. As I said, I will mainly present some observations, though my Euro-American philosophical training will drive me to some deductions based on the observations. Throughout this paper, I will use terms like ‘Native American’ or ‘Indian’ as if my conclusions are readily applicable to the peoples of all the sovereign Indian Nations. This is not necessarily true, though I do think there are many similarities from nation to nation. As Viola Cordova has said, any Native American has more in common with any other Native American than with any non-Indian. A short story will serve as a jumping of point for the rest of the talk.

  7. Comment on Weekly US politics news and updates thread - week of June 14 in ~news

    DMBuce
    Link Parent
    Whoops, fixed, thanks! Edit: Third time's the charm.

    Whoops, fixed, thanks!

    Edit: Third time's the charm.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Weekly US politics news and updates thread - week of June 14 in ~news

    DMBuce
    (edited )
    Link
    https://www.scotusblog.com/2021/06/court-holds-that-citys-refusal-to-make-referrals-to-faith-based-agency-violates-constitution/

    https://www.scotusblog.com/2021/06/court-holds-that-citys-refusal-to-make-referrals-to-faith-based-agency-violates-constitution/

    In a clash between religious freedom and public policies that protect LGBTQ people, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Philadelphia violated the First Amendment’s free exercise clause when the city stopped working with a Catholic organization that refused to certify same-sex couples as potential foster parents.

    In his 77-page concurring opinion, Alito criticized the narrowness of the court’s ruling, writing that Thursday’s decision “might as well be written on the dissolving paper sold in magic shops.” Philadelphia, Alito suggested, could easily sidestep the decision simply by getting rid of the exemption system, and the ruling “provides no guidance” for similar disputes elsewhere in the country.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on We've been telling the Alamo story wrong for nearly 200 years. Now it's time to correct the record in ~humanities

    DMBuce
    Link

    Start with the Alamo. So much of what we “know” about the battle is provably wrong.

    So why does any of this matter? What’s the harm in Texans simply embracing a myth?

    Census data indicates that Latinos are poised to become a majority of the Texas population any year now, and for them, the Alamo has long been viewed as a symbol of Anglo oppression.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on The Bigger Short. How 2008 is repeating, at a much greater magnitude, and COVID ignited the fuse. in ~finance

    DMBuce
    Link
    I stopped reading after the first bullet point, so I don't have much to say about the thread. What I will say is that I did some financial planning late last year and found the Bogleheads Wiki to...

    I stopped reading after the first bullet point, so I don't have much to say about the thread.

    What I will say is that I did some financial planning late last year and found the Bogleheads Wiki to be incredibly useful, much moreso than the conjecture I often see on meme subreddits or the contradictory info that financial advice subreddits are full of. As someone who is lucky enough to be able to save money and doesn't trust financial advisors, I'm super glad I found that wiki.

    Not financial advice, just my own personal experience as an idiot with an internet connection.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    DMBuce
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    FYI, flameshot is really good IMO and worth checking out if you haven't already. It can do imgur uploads, and also has a feature that lets you open the screencap in another app, so you could...

    I do miss some stuff like my screenshot uploading script, but I found an extension that uploads screenshots to Imgur, so I hope that would be enough, though I'd prefer uploading them to my own server instead.

    FYI, flameshot is really good IMO and worth checking out if you haven't already. It can do imgur uploads, and also has a feature that lets you open the screencap in another app, so you could probably use that to upload to your own server if you "appify" your script. Edit: Looks like someone has done something like that before

    3 votes
  12. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    DMBuce
    (edited )
    Link
    Not exactly a "project" but I just set up uBlock Origin to block Tildes comments on non-text posts except for top-level comments by the OP. The CSS is simple enough but took a while to figure out,...

    Not exactly a "project" but I just set up uBlock Origin to block Tildes comments on non-text posts except for top-level comments by the OP. The CSS is simple enough but took a while to figure out, so for anyone else who's interested:

    ##.topic-full-link ~ .topic-comments article:not(.is-comment-by-op)
    ##article:not(.topic-with-excerpt) .topic-info-comments-new
    ##article:not(.topic-with-excerpt) .topic-info-comments > *
    
  13. Comment on How some Americans are breaking out of political echo chambers in ~misc

    DMBuce
    Link Parent
    That depends on the aggregator, doesn't it? Dismissing all the news sources the article linked just because one of them included one far-right article seems a bit knee-jerk to me. I can understand...

    That depends on the aggregator, doesn't it? Dismissing all the news sources the article linked just because one of them included one far-right article seems a bit knee-jerk to me.

    I can understand not wanting to sift through them to find out which, if any, are worth paying attention to. But personally, I am happy to do that legwork when I have the time, I almost didn't read the article because of your comment, and I'm glad I did read it in spite of that because I wouldn't be aware of the linked news sources otherwise.

    All I'm saying is that I hope people don't skip over an article they might have otherwise read because of the negative reaction to it.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on How some Americans are breaking out of political echo chambers in ~misc

    DMBuce
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    The article doesn't suggest this at all as far as I can tell. Am I missing something? Edit to add: The article is about news sources that try to e.g. "give the best of both sides" or "stand...

    treating self-described conservative news sources as worth reading to keep you out of your bubble

    You can have a very healthy and diverse news diet without including garbage like Fox and OAN.

    The article doesn't suggest this at all as far as I can tell. Am I missing something?

    Edit to add: The article is about news sources that try to e.g. "give the best of both sides" or "stand against bias and information", to use two examples that were linked in the article.

    I've seen people on Tildes express that they use comments to decide whether or not to read an article, so I hope those people don't skip past this article thinking it's about reading hate-mongering, corporate astroturfing, or conspiracy-laden news sources to combat echo chambers and filter bubbles, like your comment might suggest. It's not.

    5 votes