12 votes

From controller to keyboard and mouse

So I’ve used a controller for 20 years and I’ve just started using keyboard and mouse has anyone got any advice/tips I’m finding the switch pretty hard especially the keyboard?

10 comments

  1. [3]
    Gaywallet
    (edited )
    Link
    If you're referring specifically to using a mouse/keyboard to control a game, it's just going to come with practice in general. If you're talking about being able to type better, 'teaches typing'...

    If you're referring specifically to using a mouse/keyboard to control a game, it's just going to come with practice in general.

    If you're talking about being able to type better, 'teaches typing' style games might help you become more proficient in a way that's a bit more fun than just typing random stuff.

    7 votes
    1. [2]
      Five
      Link Parent
      I’m referring to using them for gaming

      I’m referring to using them for gaming

      2 votes
      1. cfabbro
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Have you considered playing some PC typing or rhythm games to get yourself more comfortable/familiar/skilled with the M+KB setup? E.g. Typing of the Dead and OSU are both well regarded and pretty...

        Have you considered playing some PC typing or rhythm games to get yourself more comfortable/familiar/skilled with the M+KB setup? E.g. Typing of the Dead and OSU are both well regarded and pretty fun, and there are also plenty of other good typing and rhythm games out there that should also similarly help you.

        3 votes
  2. [2]
    pseudolobster
    Link
    Well, you can try starting out with more casual, low stress games like Minecraft, where you can slowly get comfortable with the controls. Or, and this is going to sound like crazy advice, you can...

    Well, you can try starting out with more casual, low stress games like Minecraft, where you can slowly get comfortable with the controls. Or, and this is going to sound like crazy advice, you can take the plunge and try out some twitchy competitive first-person shooters.

    For me, quake 3 arena, counterstrike, and unreal tournament 2004 are what made me good with a mouse. I played against bots until I needed to up the difficulty, and eventually I was able to take on people online. Those games really force you to react quickly, and provide instant feedback, which helps develop muscle memory.

    There are other reaction based games that aren't FPSes and can help build mouse skills. I can't think of many right now, but OSU! is a rhythm game that seems to be popular on reddit.

    Basically my advice is to push yourself. You're going to suck at first, but challenging yourself is the best way to develop skill, imho.

    7 votes
    1. Five
      Link Parent
      Thanks I’m trying to play overwatch so I think I will take your advice and play against bots to try get more familiar

      Thanks I’m trying to play overwatch so I think I will take your advice and play against bots to try get more familiar

      1 vote
  3. knocklessmonster
    Link
    Honestly, only worry about it for FPSes, and anywhere it feels intuitive. I only use mouse/keyboard for games where I'm going to be moving WASD and most of my interactions are clicking, like...

    Honestly, only worry about it for FPSes, and anywhere it feels intuitive. I only use mouse/keyboard for games where I'm going to be moving WASD and most of my interactions are clicking, like Stardew Valley. If it's a racing game or platformer I bust out the controller.

    You mentioned Overwatch... I can't imagine how you could play that with a controller to be honest. Back when I played CoD on my playstation I still sorta hated it. But, as mentioned, just play a bunch and get the hang of it.

    5 votes
  4. [3]
    reese
    Link
    More than anything, I think practice will help, but it is possible that you have the wrong mouse/keyboard setup. Different people find different types of peripherals comfortable. I find split...

    More than anything, I think practice will help, but it is possible that you have the wrong mouse/keyboard setup. Different people find different types of peripherals comfortable. I find split keyboards much more comfortable than normal ones, but the custom-made one I bought over a year ago, a Diverge 4, shit itself and died after a few days of use, so I returned it and vowed to never buy anything from UniKeyboard again, despite the praise on Reddit. It's probably because I was one of the first adopters of that version, but, eh, I wasn't impressed by the overall process of buying it.

    I fell back to this ridiculous-ass Corsair keyboard, which is also very comfortable. It's a standard QWERTY layout. And yeah, for keyboards I blow money out my ass, but that's because I type all the time. I'll go all out on pillows or anything I use every day for years.

    In a gaming context, the keyboard was never what really messed me up, though, which I understand is different from you. It's the mouse for me. I had a mouse for years that was just way too heavy, but I kept using it for some reason. I don't play a lot of first-person shooters, and mostly I just use the keyboard or controller for most things anyway (except for games like Path of Exile and Pillars of Eternity). But after I switched to some cheap-o mouse I got for free from the "gaming" mouse I paid some stupid amount of money for, I immediately 1) reaffirmed that I am a tool, and 2) found using the mouse to be much easier.

    3 votes
    1. [2]
      Five
      Link Parent
      I’m currently using a razer mouse and keyboard and I find them very comfy but I seem to forget what keys I need to press maybe I just need a lot more practice

      I’m currently using a razer mouse and keyboard and I find them very comfy but I seem to forget what keys I need to press maybe I just need a lot more practice

      1 vote
      1. reese
        Link Parent
        Try practicing the specific controls of the games you want to play for ten minutes, each day, for a few days. For lack of a better word I'm pretty deliberate, so I will sit there, ideally in a...

        Try practicing the specific controls of the games you want to play for ten minutes, each day, for a few days. For lack of a better word I'm pretty deliberate, so I will sit there, ideally in a tutorial or starter area, and try all of the controls of interest without threat of ensuing death or fail conditions. Normally I will never learn a game's controls unless I take time to focus on them one at a time.

        1 vote
  5. TheJorro
    Link
    Hey OP, it sounds like the issue is that you're having trouble with familiarity more than coordination. Correct me if I'm wrong. I'd recommend a gradual series of steps to getting comfortable with...

    Hey OP, it sounds like the issue is that you're having trouble with familiarity more than coordination. Correct me if I'm wrong. I'd recommend a gradual series of steps to getting comfortable with kb/m controls.

    1. Establish a baseline of buttons. There are some buttons that are universal. WASD to move, Ctrl to crouch, Left Mouse Button (LMB) to shoot things, Right Mouse Button (RMB) to aim or secondary fire, R to reload, Space to jump. Q & E lean with F as the , or sometimes E is the Interact button if the game doesn't support leaning. Find what works for you and then try to get comfortable with this. Perhaps you'll want to customize it further—I prefer using C to crouch rather than Ctrl, for example.

    2. Get a mechanically simple game and play it. Overwatch is fairly advanced in terms of controls since every character plays differently and there are different buttons you have to prioritize for each. I'd recommend a classic FPS game instead, something like Half-Life or Counter-Strike or even Call of Duty. Whatever strikes your fancy but anything that's an older single-player title should cover it. You're basically looking for a game that only makes use of the controls above. Modern revisits of older gameplay styles also work, like Doom 2016 or the latest Wolfensteins.

    3. Eventually your muscle memory will build and these universal default keys will be set for you without a thought. From there, start branching out to more complicated games. Overwatch is actually a good next step from the baseline as it's not crazy about its control scheme. Some games I'd consider to be "hard mode" for controls are: ArmA series, and Escape from Tarkov.

    Some other things to consider doing:

    • Find the right mouse sensitivity. A lot of people prefer low sensitivity when playing shooters, preferring instead to make large sweeping movements with their forearms instead of flicking with their wrists. Some claim this is for better precision, others claim it alleviates wrist strain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Try it out! Maybe it will be more comfortable for you. I believe 400 DPS is considered the "standard" low-sensitivity amount for a mouse. You should definitely do this before trying something like OSU first too, as you don't want to end up practicing in that game only to find out that you have a preference for a different mouse DPI in-game.

    • Try practicing a game that focuses on mobility instead of shooting. Not necessarily a first person shooter, but an adventure game like Tomb Raider. it's a slower-paced, more forgiving title than a lot of shooters, and most of its gameplay revolves around exploration. You use the mouse to look around, and then the keyboard to move and interact and explore. It's a good way to get used to the keyboard if you're fine with the mouse.

    • Conversely, if you feel like you need more practice with a mouse, play a twitch shooter. It will suck at first but that's the idea, you're going in the deep end. My favourite way is Counter-Strike's deathmatch mode, one-shot AK only. The idea is that you can only fire single-shots at a time. The AK will kill anyone with a direct headshot. With the way CSGO's mechanics work, it can often be more advantageous to not be the one moving so only raw mouse aim is required. At first, it will be bad and you'll find yourself frustrated that someone ran around the corner and had enough time to blast you away before you even got your reticule on them. But you'll get faster very quickly until you surprise yourself with how quickly you aimed at them. This will easily be the most frustrating suggesting in this comment but this is also legitimately how many FPS pros warm themselves up, or how many hopefuls develop their aim. It's definitely being thrown into the deep end but it develops mouse aim faster than any other method besides OSU.

    Overall, I think you'll be surprised how quickly you pick up keyboard and mouse with just a little but of practice.

    3 votes