6 votes

Is a meat-free diet really as healthy as vegetarians claim?

22 comments

  1. [9]
    ibis
    Link
    Not paying for the article, but my personal experience of vege/pescatarianism is that it is healthier just because most of the junk food I was eating/craving was meat based. Removing them as an...

    Not paying for the article, but my personal experience of vege/pescatarianism is that it is healthier just because most of the junk food I was eating/craving was meat based.
    Removing them as an option automatically made my diet waaay healthier. I can still find shitty vegetarian food if I look for it, but it isn't nearly so accessible.

    7 votes
    1. [8]
      Algernon_Asimov
      Link Parent
      The point of the article is to state, yet again, that there are nutrients found in animal products which human beings need - so people going meat-free need to plan their diet carefully. In...

      The point of the article is to state, yet again, that there are nutrients found in animal products which human beings need - so people going meat-free need to plan their diet carefully. In general, vegans tend to plan better and ensure they eat plant-based products that contain these nutrients, but vegetarians don't make that effort as much as they should. The article also says that some people who switch to a non-meat diet experience something called "brain fog" due to a deficiency of some of these nutrients (which has been confirmed by studies).

      It's not as simple as "no meat = healthier". There's a lot more to the equation than that.

      5 votes
      1. ibis
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Yes and it's not at simple as 'meat = healthier' either. It really depends on the individual. Last I checked longitudinal studies are still showing that vegetarians live longer, though.

        Yes and it's not at simple as 'meat = healthier' either. It really depends on the individual.

        Last I checked longitudinal studies are still showing that vegetarians live longer, though.

        7 votes
      2. wantavanta
        Link Parent
        Some people, on the contrary, experience brain fog when they eat meat or have increased acidity. My observation is that there are people who can easily tolerate the absence of meat in their diet,...

        Some people, on the contrary, experience brain fog when they eat meat or have increased acidity.
        My observation is that there are people who can easily tolerate the absence of meat in their diet, and some cannot last more than a week.

        5 votes
      3. [5]
        user2
        Link Parent
        What are these nutrients?

        What are these nutrients?

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          spctrvl
          Link Parent
          Vitamin B12 is the big one. It's in eggs, so vegetarians have a common source, but the only vegan food I know of that has it naturally is tempeh.

          Vitamin B12 is the big one. It's in eggs, so vegetarians have a common source, but the only vegan food I know of that has it naturally is tempeh.

          4 votes
          1. patience_limited
            Link Parent
            That's incorrect - tempeh is not a reliable source of B12. Even when it's present in a given fermentation, the quantity isn't adequate for long-term health. There are no proven dependable sources...

            That's incorrect - tempeh is not a reliable source of B12. Even when it's present in a given fermentation, the quantity isn't adequate for long-term health. There are no proven dependable sources of active B12 in non-animal foods, other than those contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria.

            The only reliable way for vegans to get adequate B12 is through supplements or fortified foods.

            7 votes
          2. Nmg
            (edited )
            Link Parent
            B12 is created by soil bacteria. It can be found in animal products because animals tend to be exposed to the outside... But there is nothing special about getting it from animals. Some countries...

            B12 is created by soil bacteria. It can be found in animal products because animals tend to be exposed to the outside... But there is nothing special about getting it from animals. Some countries fortify common foods with B12.

            Anecdotally, I just take a 2500mcg sublingual capsule once a week. My yearly blood test for the past 3 years of being vegan show that I am not deficient.

            ...and I will just cite NutritionFacts.org, which just verifies everything I just said:

            Vitamin B12 is not made by plants or animals but by microbes that blanket the earth. In today’s sanitized, modern world, the water supply is commonly chlorinated to kill off any bacteria. So, while we don’t get much B12 in the water anymore, we don’t get much cholera, either, which is a good thing!

            A regular, reliable source of vitamin B12 is critical for anyone eating a plant-based diet. Though deficiency for those starting out with adequate stores may take years to develop, the results of B12 deficiency can be devastating, with cases reported of paralysis, psychosis, blindness, and even death. Newborn infants of mothers who eat a plant-based diet and who fail to supplement may develop deficiency much more rapidly with disastrous results. Getting enough vitamin B12 is absolutely nonnegotiable for those centering their diets around plant-based foods.

            For adults under age 65, the easiest way to get B12 is to take at least one 2,500 mcg supplement each week or a daily dose of 250 mcg. Note that these doses are specific to cyanocobalamin, the preferred supplemental form of vitamin B12, as there is insufficient evidence to support the efficacy of the other forms, like methylcobalamin.

            As we age, our ability to absorb vitamin B12 may decline. For those over 65 who eat plant-based diets, the supplementation should probably be increased up to 1,000 mcg of cyanocobalamin each day.

            Instead of taking B12 supplements, it is possible to get sufficient amounts from B12-fortified foods, but we would have to eat three servings a day of foods each providing at least 25 percent of the Daily Value (on the Nutrition Facts label), with each serving eaten at least four to six hours after the last. For B12-fortified nutritional yeast, for example, two teaspoons three times a day would suffice. For most of us, though, it would probably be cheaper and more convenient to just take a supplement. Our fellow great apes get all the B12 they need eating bugs, dirt, and feces, but I’d suggest supplements instead!

            5 votes
        2. Algernon_Asimov
          Link Parent
          I recommend you do some research if you're interested in this subject. (I'm not going to type out the article piece by piece.)

          I recommend you do some research if you're interested in this subject. (I'm not going to type out the article piece by piece.)

  2. r_13
    Link
    I'm really curious to watch The Game Changers movie when it is released very soon. The trailer is filled with some clearly cherry picked case studies, but nevertheless makes me very curious. I do...

    I'm really curious to watch The Game Changers movie when it is released very soon. The trailer is filled with some clearly cherry picked case studies, but nevertheless makes me very curious. I do love the comment from the strongest man competitor at the end: "People ask me how can you be as strong as an ox if you don't eat meat? -- he laughs and replies something to the effect "Have you ever seen an ox eat meat?"

    Trailer:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSpglxHTJVM

    3 votes
  3. [13]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. [6]
      hungariantoast
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      @test @Thrabalen What about just tagging topics that link to a paywall with a paywall tag? Topics about paywalls should be tagged paywalls (plural) anyways, so there shouldn't be any conflict. I'm...

      @test @Thrabalen

      What about just tagging topics that link to a paywall with a paywall tag?

      Topics about paywalls should be tagged paywalls (plural) anyways, so there shouldn't be any conflict.

      I'm figuring that, "marking" paywalled topics with a paywall tag is the easiest way for a user to filter them out and still just as readily identifying as including a paywall indication in the title.

      6 votes
      1. [4]
        Algernon_Asimov
        Link Parent
        Would we differentiate between hard paywalls that don't let any people read any articles and soft paywalls which allow some people to read some articles?

        Would we differentiate between hard paywalls that don't let any people read any articles and soft paywalls which allow some people to read some articles?

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          hungariantoast
          Link Parent
          That would be useful. Would something like paywall.hard or paywall.soft work?

          That would be useful. Would something like paywall.hard or paywall.soft work?

          5 votes
          1. [2]
            Algernon_Asimov
            Link Parent
            I see @Grzmot has already added a paywall.hard tag to this post. I hope we'll soon see this tag applied to the many posts here from the New York Times, among others.

            I see @Grzmot has already added a paywall.hard tag to this post. I hope we'll soon see this tag applied to the many posts here from the New York Times, among others.

            2 votes
            1. Grzmot
              Link Parent
              I've taken the liberty to apply the tag as I think it's a good idea for Tildes and hope it propagates further.

              I've taken the liberty to apply the tag as I think it's a good idea for Tildes and hope it propagates further.

              3 votes
      2. Thrabalen
        Link Parent
        So... I often forget that tags exist. >.< Thank you for reminding me about the paywall tag. This is an elegant solution. In other news: I am a doof.

        So... I often forget that tags exist. >.<

        Thank you for reminding me about the paywall tag. This is an elegant solution. In other news: I am a doof.

        1 vote
    2. [2]
      Ayax28
      Link Parent
      And a very heavy one. Waiting for someone with huge solidarity to publish it here.

      And a very heavy one. Waiting for someone with huge solidarity to publish it here.

      3 votes
      1. test
        Link Parent
        Click the "Register" button below the article and enter an email and password. You don't need to verify the email to read the article; I used an address from 10minutemail. Not that a paywall being...

        Click the "Register" button below the article and enter an email and password. You don't need to verify the email to read the article; I used an address from 10minutemail.

        Not that a paywall being easily bypassed is an excuse for posting an article with one, however. I don't have a problem with paywalled articles being posted; as I commented in this thread about a similar issue, I support a creator's ability to monetize their work. However, I think that an indication in the title that an article is paywalled or a non-paywalled version in the comments would be a reasonable expectation.

        3 votes
    3. [4]
      Algernon_Asimov
      Link Parent
      I was informed quite clearly by @Deimos that it is the reader's responsibility to find a way to read the articles posted here, not the not the poster's responsibility to ensure that an article is...

      I was informed quite clearly by @Deimos that it is the reader's responsibility to find a way to read the articles posted here, not the not the poster's responsibility to ensure that an article is readable. I read a copy of this article on a different website, but this is the original source (in line with the policy that we should post original sources where possible).

      FYI: @test

      2 votes
      1. [3]
        test
        Link Parent
        That's... an odd policy. I certainly agree with posting the original work, but while you might not be required to post a version everyone can access, all 5 (6, now) comments in some way reference...

        That's... an odd policy. I certainly agree with posting the original work, but while you might not be required to post a version everyone can access, all 5 (6, now) comments in some way reference the inability to easily read the article, and only one of them actually respond to the content itself. What should have been a discussion about the merits of a meat-free diet is now, but didn't have to be, more a meta-discussion about Tildes and the accessibility of its content.

        4 votes
        1. Thrabalen
          Link Parent
          I'd love to see it become a thing where people voluntarily put "(pay wall)" into their titles, so that readers will be informed. I'd love it more if we could look for sources without pay walls...

          I'd love to see it become a thing where people voluntarily put "(pay wall)" into their titles, so that readers will be informed. I'd love it more if we could look for sources without pay walls entirely... if the onus is on the reader (as it apparently is), then everyone has to seek out a non-paywall alternative. If the onus is on the poster, only they need do it. But, My opinion is not official opinion, so I'm content to say my piece here and no more.

          1 vote
        2. Algernon_Asimov
          Link Parent
          Make a post in ~tildes to discuss this issue. I did. That's how I found out @Deimos' opinion about this.

          What should have been a discussion about the merits of a meat-free diet is now, but didn't have to be, more a meta-discussion about Tildes and the accessibility of its content.

          Make a post in ~tildes to discuss this issue. I did. That's how I found out @Deimos' opinion about this.