Toric's recent activity

  1. Comment on Good basic electronics toys for twelve year olds? in ~hobbies

    Toric
    Link Parent
    She LOVES legos. my last 4 or 5 gifts to her have been various lego sets. I am looking to introduce her to something a little more complex, as shes expressed an intrest in learning about computers...

    She LOVES legos. my last 4 or 5 gifts to her have been various lego sets. I am looking to introduce her to something a little more complex, as shes expressed an intrest in learning about computers and robotics. I was considering mindstorms, but unfortunately, my family doesn't actually have any windows computer... (other than work computers, they just use their mobile devices, and my sister has an old laptop with linux on it I got her for lockdown school.)

    5 votes
  2. Good basic electronics toys for twelve year olds?

    Back when I was a kid, I had a radioshack 200-in-1 science fair electronics kit this one I loved that thing, and it sparked an interest in tech that ultimately led me to a CS degree. Id like to...

    Back when I was a kid, I had a radioshack 200-in-1 science fair electronics kit this one

    I loved that thing, and it sparked an interest in tech that ultimately led me to a CS degree.

    Id like to buy something similar for my much younger sister, but nowdays everything I can find is arduino or raspi based. Id love to get something like that eventually, but I think it might be better to get a kit that more focuses on individual components first... Does anyone know of one sold these days?

    Alternatively, if anyone has one of these and would be willing to scan the book, Id love to build one of these as a breadboard-based system.

    13 votes
  3. Comment on SCOTUS sides with Google over Oracle in ~tech

  4. Comment on This blog is now hosted on a GPS/LTE modem in ~comp

    Toric
    Link
    Im surprised it uses linux... Id have expected a smaller kernel, such as minix, RIOT, or an RTOS...

    Im surprised it uses linux... Id have expected a smaller kernel, such as minix, RIOT, or an RTOS...

  5. Comment on If humankind left Earth and came back after 100 years, how much of our digital files would still be readable? in ~talk

    Toric
    Link Parent
    Could I get the name of that short story, or a link if you have one handy? I love sci-fi short stories that explore unique concepts.)

    Could I get the name of that short story, or a link if you have one handy? I love sci-fi short stories that explore unique concepts.)

  6. Comment on If humankind left Earth and came back after 100 years, how much of our digital files would still be readable? in ~talk

    Toric
    Link Parent
    If we are talking archeology, however, 2-4 can by overcome by advanced data forensics technique (2 not entirely, but its only a small area that gets lost). Definitly not plug-and-play, but keep in...

    If we are talking archeology, however, 2-4 can by overcome by advanced data forensics technique (2 not entirely, but its only a small area that gets lost). Definitly not plug-and-play, but keep in mind we've spent decades deciphering a single clay tablet, an HDD platter will be comparatively a peice of cake.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on Massive container ship stuck in Suez Canal, blocking world's busiest shipping route in ~news

    Toric
    Link Parent
    IMO, nuke propulsion is probably one of our go-to long term options. Its a sea-proven tech (the military uses it for carriers), its total cost could be brought down a LOT by mass production of...

    IMO, nuke propulsion is probably one of our go-to long term options. Its a sea-proven tech (the military uses it for carriers), its total cost could be brought down a LOT by mass production of reactors, and has zero carbon emissions. Also, uranium is relatively plentiful in the earths crust, compared to how much needs to be used to generate power.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Massive container ship stuck in Suez Canal, blocking world's busiest shipping route in ~news

    Toric
    Link Parent
    the big problem is you cant regulate them. No countries EPA-equivalent has justification over international waters. The boats only have to follow the laws of the country whos flag they are flying,...

    the big problem is you cant regulate them. No countries EPA-equivalent has justification over international waters. The boats only have to follow the laws of the country whos flag they are flying, which is to say, countries who make significant portions of their income on ship registration fees. Those countries are not going to pass environmental regulations on boats, and even if one or two does, it will simply go bankrupt as ships immediately register with other countries. As soon as a ship is in international waters, its pretty much only regulated by international marine time laws...

  9. Comment on I like that the boat is stuck in ~life

    Toric
    Link
    Hes right. This is perhaps one of the least controversial news stories in the last... I dont know how long. And its refreshing. Its even mildly amusing. The article itself is honestly a breath of...

    Hes right. This is perhaps one of the least controversial news stories in the last... I dont know how long. And its refreshing. Its even mildly amusing.

    The article itself is honestly a breath of fresh air.

    31 votes
  10. Comment on Massive container ship stuck in Suez Canal, blocking world's busiest shipping route in ~news

    Toric
    Link
    At what point are they just going to cut the thing up to disloge it?

    At what point are they just going to cut the thing up to disloge it?

    1 vote
  11. Comment on How it happened: Transcript of the US-China opening remarks in Alaska in ~news

    Toric
    Link Parent
    Im not sure pallas was intending to say that america was the bad guy here, only that he was dissapointed by americas position itself. Both 'sides' can be bad...

    Im not sure pallas was intending to say that america was the bad guy here, only that he was dissapointed by americas position itself. Both 'sides' can be bad...

    4 votes
  12. Comment on To those who are on the autism spectrum, what's something you wish more people knew/understood? in ~talk

    Toric
    Link
    That no two of us are alike. If you know one autistic person, you know one autistic person. While me and my fiancee (who is also autistic) have certain personality traits in common, we are about...
    • Exemplary
    • That no two of us are alike. If you know one autistic person, you know one autistic person. While me and my fiancee (who is also autistic) have certain personality traits in common, we are about as different from each other as any other couple.

      Autism has multiple sets of symptoms, of which only a few may manifest in a given person. The diagnosis is given based on the person having multiple symptoms from that set, but people rarely have all of them. That said, Ill generalize to my and my fiancee's experience from here on out because that's what I know.

    • It does exists in adults. Pretty much everything you hear about autism is how it affects young kids. One rarely hears autism in connection to anything above middle school. You cant find any autism resources for anyone older than 14 or so. If you want to see a therapist, you have to choose between one that has experience with autism or one that has experience working with adults. As an autistic adult, its a bit disheartening. We do exitst, we do still need help, but no one seems to care after your a teen.

    • Parents of autistic children are great, but tend to overpower our own voices.

      Look, parents, I know (most) of you are just trying to help, and I really appreciate my own parents for everything they have done. I wouldn't be here anymore if my parents had not been who they were. But we also want to have our own voice.

      \begin{rant}
      What really irks me is how the conversation about autism seems to shift to how hard it is on the parents. Parents have a hard job, yes, but sometimes its like the hardship of the person isn't even considered, because how awful is it that the parents be beset upon by that little beast!
      \end{rant}

      That said, Id like to say, @suspended, Im not at all targeting you in this. This part would have gone in whether you had commented or not. You seem to be trying your best... it just... tiring sometimes that our voices are so often drowned out by those of our caretakers.

    • Most of us are good at hiding it. I am the exception to this point, actually. I never quite got the hang of 'masking' like my fiancee and other autistics did. It quite possibly had something to do with the fact that I was raised in an isolated environment, and didn't have much social contact through school and the likes.

      No matter how good we are at hiding it, though, doing so is exhausting, both physically and mentally. Social interaction in general is exhausting. Sometimes I get home from work at 5 and go straight to bed, getting 14 hours of sleep or so. I wish more people understood that. Its not just that we are bad at social interaction, its not even that we don't like it! (I need a lot of social contact, in fact. I get lonely easily, and that does not help with my anxiety). Its that social interaction is very tiring.

    That's all I can think of off the top of my head. It got a bit ranty, but there's a lot of stuff I need to get off my chest.

    13 votes
  13. Comment on Do any other US citizens think of emigrating? in ~talk

    Toric
    Link Parent
    Possibly. From what Ive heard, though, you get tax credit for taxes paid to the country you live in. So we would only pay the difference between european taxes and ameican ones. I think.

    Possibly. From what Ive heard, though, you get tax credit for taxes paid to the country you live in. So we would only pay the difference between european taxes and ameican ones. I think.

  14. Comment on Do any other US citizens think of emigrating? in ~talk

    Toric
    Link
    Me an my fiancee has semi-seriously talked about emigrating before we have kids. I grew up internationally, so I have a lot less emotional investment in the country. She is a bit more reluctant...

    Me an my fiancee has semi-seriously talked about emigrating before we have kids. I grew up internationally, so I have a lot less emotional investment in the country. She is a bit more reluctant and has a few more attachments, but its still something we would like to look into.

    For me, there are a couple of reasons.

    • education: What I saw of the US education system for the part of my childhood I spent here made me never want to entrust my kids to the system. Its a babysitting system more than its a childcare system. Many school districts have absolutely refused to modernize, or, when they do, they go off chasing buzzwords. They invariably spend 10x the money on the football team than they spend on other, more productive, extracurricular. (my robotics team worked out of a closet in the woodshop while the football team got $2 million to improve the already fancy football field.

    • healthcare: I have a lot of mental health issues, including autism and generalized anxiety. If I wasn't on the state healthcare plan (will be till 26, I believe), Id be completely broke and most likely homeless due to the cost of insurance and copay's/deductibles on therapy and meds.

    • workplace protections: While my disability is technically covered by the ACA, I have yet to get a single reply from any company where I ticked the little disability box on the job application, and I have experienced retaliation and being pushed out of jobs if I let my employer know about my disability after being hired. Mental health is still stigmatized quite a bit in the US workforce, and that's not even getting into the lack of workplace protections that everyone feels.

    • where my taxes are going: I don't mind paying taxes, I really don't. But I cant help but feel uneasy about what my country spends my taxes on. I don't want my tax bill to go towards and imperialistic military more than it does healthcare and education combined. Evidently my vote doesn't matter to the president (see: Syria) or my representatives, so the only other thing I can do is vote with my wallet, so to speak.

    12 votes
  15. Comment on Rocket Lab introduces Neutron, an eight ton payload rocket in ~space

    Toric
    Link Parent
    I must admit, I am dissapointed to hear about them going public...

    I must admit, I am dissapointed to hear about them going public...

    2 votes
  16. Comment on What is the most difficult or complex thing you have programmed, created, or otherwise made? in ~comp

    Toric
    Link Parent
    Where did you get nine machines to run the thing? did you end up using the universitys computer cluster?

    Where did you get nine machines to run the thing? did you end up using the universitys computer cluster?

    2 votes
  17. Comment on Stop telling women they have imposter syndrome in ~life

    Toric
    Link Parent
    Don't get me wrong, this does not hold me back from calling them out on their BS. (no, the thing that holds me back is the specter of homelessness.) I just prefer to use somewhat less generalizing...

    Don't get me wrong, this does not hold me back from calling them out on their BS. (no, the thing that holds me back is the specter of homelessness.) I just prefer to use somewhat less generalizing language while doing so.
    I, personally, prefer the term Toxic Masculinity.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on Stop telling women they have imposter syndrome in ~life

    Toric
    (edited )
    Link
    First off, I should say that I'm coming at this as an autistic white male. As such, I visually fit many of the stereotypes of the 'successful white male' but once the autism is found out, either...
    • Exemplary

    First off, I should say that I'm coming at this as an autistic white male. As such, I visually fit many of the stereotypes of the 'successful white male' but once the autism is found out, either through my own confession or a series of involuntary slip ups in my masking, things turn very different.

    Imposter syndrome took a fairly universal feeling of discomfort, second-guessing, and mild anxiety in the workplace and pathologized it.

    First off, Imposter syndrome is not recognized as anything pathological. Its not even in the DSM. It is just what the author describes it as, a (more concise) name for a fairly universal feeling of discomfort, second guessing, and mild anxiety in the workplace. It has never been pathologized outside of pop psychology magazines.

    As white men progress, their feelings of doubt usually abate as their work and intelligence are validated over time.

    I know anecdotal evidence doesn't disprove a theory, and I am yet young enough that I may not have reached this stage yet, but several of my family members have had imposter syndrome caused depressive episodes that put them out of work for weeks. My uncle, a upper management businessman, still hasn't been able to return to work because of it.
    Imposter syndrome can appear with or without others doubting your abilities. While I know that systemic biases can make it worse, it can also be completely self contained, especially for people with mental health issues.

    The label of imposter syndrome is a heavy load to bear. “Imposter” brings a tinge of criminal fraudulence to the feeling of simply being unsure or anxious about joining a new team or learning a new skill.

    It is supposed to remind you of criminal fraudulence, because that is what it feels like. You doubt yourself, feel like your ripping off the company by demanding your paycheck even though you feel your skills are worthless. Your terrified that those around you will find out and oust you. The fraudulent connotation is entirely intentional, not because one is a fraud, but because someone feels like a fraud.

    Add to that the medical undertone of “syndrome,” which recalls the “female hysteria” diagnoses of the nineteenth century.

    So this is one of the big gripes I have about this article. Its written like imposter syndrome only persistently occurs in women, and as such is a women's 'disorder'. It is not. I'm not sure why it irritates me so much, but it reminds me of all the resources I have tried to go through as an adult with autism only to be met with a brick wall when the adult part comes up. This article acts like imposter syndrome only affects one demographic when in reality it is a fairly universal phenomenon, just like many organizations and even individuals act like autism is something that only exists in kids.

    We often falsely equate confidence — most often, the type demonstrated by white male leaders — with competence and leadership. Employees who can’t (or won’t) conform to male-biased social styles are told they have imposter syndrome.

    Forewarning, this section goes a bit beyond just this article to a slight problem I have with gender studies as a whole. Keep in mind I have no formal education in the field apart from some literature classes I took for my liberal arts associates degree at community college (working on my CS degree now, not much gender studies there). I am more speaking as someone who comes across these articles regular and reads them in full.

    I am... uncomfortable to say the least about the stereotype that has emerged around 'white males'.

    A more precise term, and the one that I use, is 'toxic masculinity', Why is 'white male' a bad term for the sets of behavior that critical gender theory refers to when it uses that phrase? Because it is a stereotype, one that not all, and Id even argue a minority of, white men fit into. Furthermore, it is a stereotype used to designate or refer to harmful and toxic behavior. The same behavior that some in academia assign to 'white males' often harms men, white included, that don't fit into the 'white male' stereotype. I changed college degrees because the industry I was going into was dominated by 'white male' behaviors and practices, despite being headed by a young woman.

    Heck, just look at the language in the article. Women are referred to as just that, women. As they should be. (this is outside the reference to female hysteria, where the clinical 'female' reminds us of the time when women were viewed as less human.) A quick grep shows us 1 female to 37 women. On the other hand, men are almost always referred to as 'males', a more clinical, less human noun. Searching for ' men ' (with spaces, or you get a lot of 'women' gives us 2 men to 5 males. As seemingly inconsequential as these words seem, they do have meaning, and using 'female' as a noun to refer to women is generally frowned upon. Why is 'male' to refer to men more popular in diversity related writing?

    I guess what I am trying to say is that as a white male that does not fit into the mold of 'white male', the stereotype that seems to have been adopted by academia is harmful to people, in the same way feminine and racial stereotypes are harmful.

    Imposter syndrome is especially prevalent in biased, toxic cultures that value individualism and overwork.

    This is what I do agree with with the article. My fundamental disagreement is the cause of that culture. I would postulate that it is not any inherent masculine trait that causes it (Come on people? what happened to gender being a social construct!) and more the perverse incentives offered by our incredibly profit oriented capitalistic culture.

    30 votes
  19. Comment on Writing Club #1 Submissions in ~creative

    Toric
    Link Parent
    I assume Death is prachett inspired? if so, good job, you captured that spirit perfectly.

    I assume Death is prachett inspired? if so, good job, you captured that spirit perfectly.

    2 votes
  20. Comment on Writing Club #1 Submissions in ~creative

    Toric
    Link Parent
    I love poetry that is the 'explanation of feelings', giving a more in depth image of what a feeling is like. This is one of those, describing perfectly the feeling of affirmation by someone you...

    I love poetry that is the 'explanation of feelings', giving a more in depth image of what a feeling is like. This is one of those, describing perfectly the feeling of affirmation by someone you care about.

    2 votes