azulez's recent activity

  1. Comment on US Supreme Court hears arguments in New Jersey "Bridgegate" scandal. The decision could have broad implications for how federal prosecutors pursue allegations of public corruption in ~news

    azulez
    Link Parent
    This decision needs to be upheld or arbitrary political retaliation is effectively legalized. What a sociopathic move. What's next, illegally withholding authorized funds?

    This decision needs to be upheld or arbitrary political retaliation is effectively legalized. What a sociopathic move.

    What's next, illegally withholding authorized funds?

    11 votes
  2. Comment on What are your hobbies? in ~hobbies

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Hey! Woah! Okay, so I've been interested in potentially getting into paragliding a little. I do a lot of motorcycling/trackcross/rc truck/quadcopter/stuff and I've been REALLY excited by the...

    Hey! Woah! Okay, so I've been interested in potentially getting into paragliding a little. I do a lot of motorcycling/trackcross/rc truck/quadcopter/stuff and I've been REALLY excited by the prospect associated with some of the electric paragliding rigs coming out.

    I live in a condo with no garage and limited space, so I have to go pretty minimalist in everything I do that takes up space, and while I am not totally sold on the current generation of electric paragliding rigs, I think it has a lot of potential for both cleanliness (can't really keep gas stuff inside w/o shed/garage) and space-saving. Sooo.... have you looked into any of these? One I saw looks kinda quad-copterish but folds down.. They all seem to be really expensive (like 4-5k) right now. I expect that that will come down eventually.

    Also in general, how did you get into it? What resources did you pursue? Personally I live in the northeast, so it's probably like a 1.5 season window, so I don't think it's particularly popular. What advice would you give to someone starting out?

    I've flown small planes in the air before, for brief periods (no license, so no takeoff/landing - just friends and lessons which I had to abandon due to cost at the time), but that seems much more.. structured and less potentially nerve-wracking. What were you into before you started, and how did you get where you are?

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Use This, Not That: Positive Swaps for the New Year in ~talk

    azulez
    Link Parent
    I've been getting soylent bottles shipped on the regular, and have been recently thinking about just how awful that must be from a environmental footprint perspective. Maybe it's time to swap to...

    I've been getting soylent bottles shipped on the regular, and have been recently thinking about just how awful that must be from a environmental footprint perspective. Maybe it's time to swap to the dry stuff as like a baseline food supplement.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on What's your SILLY unpopular opinion? in ~talk

    azulez
    Link Parent
    My theory is that happens because morning people wake up and do things, then we wake up and have to deal with what they've done on top of doing things. The only solution is to break things at...

    My theory is that happens because morning people wake up and do things, then we wake up and have to deal with what they've done on top of doing things.

    The only solution is to break things at night so that they have to spend some of their time fixing them, and thusly restore balance and bring harmony to all schedules.

    12 votes
  5. Comment on Giving automation the power to detect crime and enforce punishment has ramifications, even for minor infractions in ~tech

    azulez
    Link Parent
    While there's the potential for people to develop bad habits, I think traffic density does play a role in the risk posed by many maneuvers, so to a degree yes. Speeding is actually a great example...

    Furthermore, should traffic laws only count when a certain amount of cars are in traffic?

    While there's the potential for people to develop bad habits, I think traffic density does play a role in the risk posed by many maneuvers, so to a degree yes. Speeding is actually a great example of this, since it tends to be relative speed differences that cause accidents. I would suggest something like this to you -- the speed limit is 20mph higher than it is now, but passing someone on a divided highway the next lane over at more than a 5mph difference is a ticketable offense.

    We already have that in speed cameras. And they are one of the best oncoming collision safety deterrents we have, per euro used.

    Have speed limits and fines been adjusted accordingly with 100% enforcement? Are they still used on divided highways where there is essentially no possibility of an oncoming collision? What is the recourse for a maliciously configured camera?

    Additionally what's stopping people from learning where the cameras are and minding their speeds only there? It should also be noted that cameras don't pull people over, so if someone is driving recklessly and it leads to a fatal accident, the camera did nothing. I'd be interested if you can link some studies that confirm your assertion.

    Generally speaking, road engineering is the best collision safety possible. There are ways to design roads to control speeds without the use of speed bumps, such as narrowing them or creating rough shoulders. This doesn't stop reckless individuals but it will slow down the 85th percentile -- which is something to read up on, if you're interested in this kind of thing!

    This is a completely absurd comparison.

    It's not as absurd as you might think! Pavlovian responses in humans are real. Emotional associations as well. Merely pulling someone over with simply a warning for an early offense is very effective, in fact, despite not issuing a fine! Emotional triggers to memory are real, and a disassociated punishment is not as effective. This guy got a fine and didn't even know he did anything wrong.

    Additionally, a very high percentage of electronically issued tickets are dismissed when appealed in the US. This typically involves having to take a day off work, which also destroys real human productivity.

    Not only that, speed and red-light cameras can be abused. There are often situations where certain speed limits don't make sense with the way a road is set up, or light timings can be maliciously adjusted -- there are actual cases of these things in the states. You could have been operating in a completely reasonable manner and then suddenly have a 400$ ticket -- as was the case in this article. He had no chance to have his situation reasonably evaluated by another human being before being forced to either pay or take a day off of work to appeal.

    You may not be allowed to cross that white line, but what if doing so prevents you from hitting a pedestrian or causes you to avoid an accident? Or what if there is simply no one around - as was mentioned earlier. If no one is in danger, then I fail to see the purpose of issuing blanket fines with no situational consideration. That is literally why we have judges, juries, and sentencing guidelines.

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Far-right social network Gab releases "Dissenter", a browser extension allowing Gab users to comment on the pages they're viewing in ~tech

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Do they publish information about the moderation team? Or are they going with a bot-abusable upvote/downvote model to suppress dissenting voices? What info does it scrape from users?

    Do they publish information about the moderation team? Or are they going with a bot-abusable upvote/downvote model to suppress dissenting voices?

    What info does it scrape from users?

    3 votes
  7. Comment on What are some things other people dislike that you quite enjoy? in ~talk

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Man, sport bikes are awesome. I wanted one ever since I was a kid. The 90s body styles, the sounds they made.. seeing them on the track. It was amazing. And then I bought one. After getting a 1984...

    Man, sport bikes are awesome. I wanted one ever since I was a kid. The 90s body styles, the sounds they made.. seeing them on the track. It was amazing. And then I bought one.

    After getting a 1984 GS 550L to learn and screw around on I upgraded to a 94 GSXR1100, and holy fuck. That machine was absolutely insane. Despite being easy to flick into corners, it rode those corners like a rail. It was a heavy monster, but it was the god damn fastest thing I've ever experienced. It was substantially more than the force of a plane taking off, and I paid about 3-4 grand for it. But, ultimately, that was the same reason I got rid of it.

    On the street, you couldn't really utilize it without doing something illegal within about 2 seconds. I've always been one of those slow-in/fast-out riders on the street, which I still think is the way to go, but a lot of the other sportbike riders around me in college just wanted to go fast-fast-fast all the time. That made riding with those people something I didn't feel great about, so I eventually fell out of the group.

    The bike ended up sitting for a few years while I moved and dealt with some stuff before I got the bug again. This time I downgraded substantially and went to a 2008 DL650. That's one of those 'adventure bikes' that have become so popular as of late. It was also the first vehicle I purchased brand spanking new. I was tired of weird shit cropping up my used vehicles that had to be dealt with.. and it was only around 7k!

    I won't say it's the most fun I've had riding, but it's the kind of fun that I need now. It's a slow thing that you can drive fast. It's got the right balance and geometry - essentially like riding a comfortable dirt bike - that it's much better for touring than the GSXR, yet I still feel much more 'in control' than I felt on the comfy ass GS - L. I don't fear the occasional gravel roads that crop up, and so far pretty much nothing has gone wrong with it for 9 years.

    During that time some of my local, actual, pre-existing friends decided to get into riding and lo and behold I had group rides again, but with SANE people! It was amazing. Unfortunately they have since moved from the area, and I'm back alone.. so I decided to spring for a BRZ and experiment with manual/rwd cars for a little while.

    Now then.. my thoughts on sport bikes at this point is that they have differentiated into track-sport and street-sport. The big difference, as far as I understand, is the riding position is not as aggressive and is more centered. This is a big factor. At this point I /still/ think it's a bit ridiculous to buy something like a Ninja H2 for the street. I haven't done my research in a while but the H2 SX is taller and looks a lot more comfortable. It may be heavier, but it's not going to make a substantial difference on the street. If I were to go shopping tomorrow, I'd be looking at one of these street-sport bikes, OR a sport tourer. Renting a fully kitted BMW K1200RS for 3 days and doing rt1 in california was fucking magic.

    I'll probably go back up in displacement again, but a part of me also wants a little 250 to do track days on because it sounds fun and hilarious. Generally the less bike you have, the more wiggle room you have for improving, and the less chance you have of getting into trouble at a speed too quick for you to deal with. You'll always have other drivers as the biggest factor on the road, but the key is figuring out what you're doing without being a fuckin numpty, and not only figuring out what the bike can do, but also where you shouldn't put /yourself/.

    So that's my experience on various classes of bikes and kinda where I'm at. At the end of the day, bikes are a bit like guns in that they're a tool, have a great variety of different users (including 'lifestylers'), and it's up to the USER to make them dangerous or not. However, on the street, you're going to have idiots in two tone metal monstrosities, so while the bike may not be inherently dangerous, public roadways ARE and WILL ALWAYS BE. Recognizing that and accepting that should be a central tenant. Understanding that you are putting more than just yourself at risk is also something important to consider - family, friends, future. You said it right when you said it's less about you than it is about others.

    I fully understand why my mom worries; she overestimates the risk, but also understands the worst potential consequences of bad decision making. She's a mom - that's practically the job description. That kind of thinking keeps you from making stupid decisions - the kind of stuff that sportbike riders /and/ cruiser riders are stereotypically famous for. It's actually kinda funny; since I transitioned to adventure class, cops have been a lot friendlier. But that class is also getting a lot wider market exposure now too, so who knows.

    I know this is getting a little all over the place, but legit the worst rider I've ever seen was an old harley dude at my licensing/training class. He was a total braggart at the beginning, and was the only one to fail at the end. And it was fucking spectacular. Reiterating, from a practical perspective all motorcycles are roughly equally dangerous, but it's the rider that is the controllable factor.

    Oh, and sportbikes are fucking awesome.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on I've taken the leap from reddit in ~tildes

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Oof.. I've never been part of a community that direct about it, but in some ways that makes it easier to identify them. Being ghosted or steamrolled by people on the regular can be almost as bad,...

    Oof.. I've never been part of a community that direct about it, but in some ways that makes it easier to identify them. Being ghosted or steamrolled by people on the regular can be almost as bad, but you never actually get the pointed feedback and just kind of wonder if it's all in your head or not.. which it could be, or it could not be.

    I fucking hate ambiguity like that. :P But I've been trying to take a step back when I can.. comes in cycles. Human social need dynamics are such a fucking beast.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the 'pencil towers' of New York's super-rich in ~design

    azulez
    Link
    I hate these skinnytalls. Spent some time directly across from One, it was just spooky. Hearing about the big voids of 'mechanical space' is kind of annoying as well. At least I'm sure the view...

    I hate these skinnytalls. Spent some time directly across from One, it was just spooky. Hearing about the big voids of 'mechanical space' is kind of annoying as well. At least I'm sure the view will be nice for the .0000001%.

    7 votes
  10. Comment on Giving automation the power to detect crime and enforce punishment has ramifications, even for minor infractions in ~tech

    azulez
    Link Parent
    With 100% transparency in crime also needs to come adjustment of laws. Perhaps we can automate that too? This guy got fined 450 bucks for that small, incidental violation with no other cars in...

    With 100% transparency in crime also needs to come adjustment of laws. Perhaps we can automate that too?

    This guy got fined 450 bucks for that small, incidental violation with no other cars in view. That's an insane number for what he did.

    Imagine automated fines for exceeding the speed limit and how that would affect the average person. The thing is our laws are designed around imperfect enforcement (have you heard of excess punishments being referred to as a 'deterent?'), and to suddenly make enforcement perfect isn't going to magically make lawmakers revise existing laws. That would be being perceived as 'soft on crime', whereas the 'hard on crime' political mantra has been a regular on the scene, leading to the insane sentencing around, for example, drug enforcement.

    While I agree that maybe these tools should be deployed, one strategy I would like to see is having them paired with an 'automation' violation type, maybe halving the fee -- or more. Essentially the smoothest way to start this off is to adjust the number of violations/revenue generation figure to match preexisting enforcement, and then tweak the knobs from there.

    edit:
    Further I would like to point out that delayed enforcement/feedback does not work. People need immediate feedback for punishment to work. You don't use the 'stick' on an animal two weeks after it pooped on your rug. There's no association, and it's merely cruelty. This, itself, at these levels, is merely cruelty for revenue's sake.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on I would be fine if ads were implemented to help fund Tildes in ~tildes

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Also curious. The site itself seems so light weight that it's amazing. I'd be very interested in how expensive it is, resource wise etc, per user on average. I love stats like that.

    Also curious. The site itself seems so light weight that it's amazing. I'd be very interested in how expensive it is, resource wise etc, per user on average. I love stats like that.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on Infinite parallel universes in ~talk

    azulez
    Link
    I think about this sometimes, but the net effect is that I think it curbs some of my riskier behaviors. That time I decided to scale the outer ledge of a building, ghost-busters style? That's...

    I think about this sometimes, but the net effect is that I think it curbs some of my riskier behaviors. That time I decided to scale the outer ledge of a building, ghost-busters style? That's probably one of my biggest ones where now I'm like, especially considering a couple of the other variables which were in play... Wowwww dude.

    Realistically there's nothing you can do about the past, let alone alternate potential pasts~ It's something to think about in a fun way, but not something to dwell on. It just serves as an additional excuse to think about the potential consequences of whatever you're doing, so a net positive.

    Oh -- I was also going to drop this on you, since it sounds like new things to do might be welcome during your down time. http://rationallyspeakingpodcast.org/show/rs101-max-tegmark-on-the-mathematical-universe-hypothesis.html

    1 vote
  13. Comment on We need a loveable mascot in ~tildes

    azulez
    Link Parent
    Can we give the ~ eyes, a personality, and the ability to intrusively offer grammatical and formatting suggestions?

    Can we give the ~ eyes, a personality, and the ability to intrusively offer grammatical and formatting suggestions?

  14. Comment on Prisoners striking in 17 states over prison conditions in ~news

    azulez
    Link
    If you guys remember this, there was a policy shift which would have begun to phase out private prisons until it was reversed after Trump's victory....

    If you guys remember this, there was a policy shift which would have begun to phase out private prisons until it was reversed after Trump's victory.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-prisons/u-s-reverses-obama-era-move-to-phase-out-private-prisons-idUSKBN1622NN

    Prisons for profit are one of the largest ethical violations we have in our society. It's absolutely horrifying that people think a company with an ethical duty to maximize profit to shareholders can conduct itself morally when its entire existence depends on the incarceration of human beings.

    Many have literal quotas which require the state to provide them with a certain number of prisoners or pay large penalties, thus financially incentivizing the state and the tax payers themselves to convict and incarcerate.

    https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2015/jul/31/report-finds-two-thirds-private-prison-contracts-include-lockup-quotas/

    The whole thing is a fucking horror show.

    5 votes
  15. Comment on Florida declares a state of emergency as red tide kills animals and disrupts tourism in ~enviro

    azulez
    Link
    Seems like an appropriate place to post this -- https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/ocean-acidification-promotes-disruptive-and-harmful-algal-blooms-on-our-coasts/ Welcome to Earth's carbon...

    Seems like an appropriate place to post this --

    https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/ocean-acidification-promotes-disruptive-and-harmful-algal-blooms-on-our-coasts/

    The general decline in ocean pH (i.e., more acidic conditions) from the increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) is well documented. Also well documented are increased nutrients entering coastal waters often promoting excessive and ecosystem disruptive algae blooms, including harmful algal blooms. The decay of these coastal blooms promotes bacterial respiration resulting in increased CO2, lower pH, and low oxygen conditions.

    At the recent 7th Symposium on Harmful Algal Blooms in the U.S., Dr. Christopher Gobler of Stony Brook University spoke on the often overlooked feedback and outcomes of acidifying sea water, high nutrients, and low oxygen levels. Dr. Gobler’s NCCOS-sponsored research shows that nutrient loading and acidification promote growth and increased toxicity of the red tide algal species Alexandrium fundyense. He also found evidence the destructive brown tide species Aureococcus anophagefferens and Aureoumbra lagunensis self-manipulate the pH, oxygen, and CO2 levels in their surrounding environment to promote their blooms at the expense of benign phytoplankton.

    Welcome to Earth's carbon recapture mechanics.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on 'Dozens dead' in Italian bridge collapse in ~news

    azulez
    Link Parent
    It's so difficult for society to just bite the bullet on things like this up until it's too late.. See global warming, for example.. I wonder if the bystander effect plays a part as well. Everyone...

    It's so difficult for society to just bite the bullet on things like this up until it's too late.. See global warming, for example.. I wonder if the bystander effect plays a part as well. Everyone looking at a bridge that's about to fall down going, 'someone should do something about that.'

    Actually addressing issues like this requires a strong leader willing to push such a disruption before it happens on its own, as well as engineering and maintaining functional bypasses for when such a major disruption of infrastructure occurs - hopefully done in a planned, by hand sort of way, before 'mother nature does it for us'.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on ASL? Just kidding but seriously where are most of you Tildoes from? in ~talk

    azulez
    Link
    Boston, MA reporting in!

    Boston, MA reporting in!

    3 votes
  18. Comment on On the topic of technological tribalism in ~comp

    azulez
    Link Parent
    It's also something that the open tag system seems prepared to handle pretty well, potentially, as much of a concern that could be with regard to bad behavior. I'm not the most up to date on the...

    It's also something that the open tag system seems prepared to handle pretty well, potentially, as much of a concern that could be with regard to bad behavior. I'm not the most up to date on the discussions since tagging disappeared, but filtering jokes to the bottom or solutions to the top could be a decent solution. I'm not sure how that would work in child conversations, but I don't want to get too off topic.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on Advice for people terrified of board games? in ~games.tabletop

    azulez
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Still very with you on the fear thing.. I would say look at the meta of dealing with exactly that situation. Learning on your feet in front of people is absolutely a skill in itself, and...

    Still very with you on the fear thing.. I would say look at the meta of dealing with exactly that situation. Learning on your feet in front of people is absolutely a skill in itself, and developing your tool-set will help you in the long term (potentially outside of games) - and paying attention/learning from that is something that carries across all games; getting familiar with the sensation and that it's ok to not know what you're doing. Important thing is being able to center and find direction, work on things incrementally. It's about developing that process.

    Heck, you're already developing it by asking. :]

    Good luck! And remember, it's just another experience.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on One of the first covert listening devices was a large Seal of the Unitest States given by the Soviet Union to W. Averell Harriman, the United States Ambassador to the Soviet Union, on August 4, 1945 in ~misc

    azulez
    (edited )
    Link
    Trojan Horse? Meet ̷T̷r̷o̷j̷a̷n̷ Soviet Eagle. The method of transmission was pretty neat. It contained a passive antenna that would transmit vibrations when 'illuminated' with an EM field. Also...

    Trojan Horse? Meet ̷T̷r̷o̷j̷a̷n̷ Soviet Eagle.

    The method of transmission was pretty neat. It contained a passive antenna that would transmit vibrations when 'illuminated' with an EM field.

    Also invented by the same guy who create the Theremin.

    2 votes