deknalis's recent activity

  1. Comment on The Matrix Resurrections – Official trailer 1 in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Can't wait. Not the best trailer but I trust Lana Wachowski enough to not Force Awakens this and just retread the same ground, given the Wachowskis have a track record of being some of the most...

    Can't wait. Not the best trailer but I trust Lana Wachowski enough to not Force Awakens this and just retread the same ground, given the Wachowskis have a track record of being some of the most unique and wild directors around, certainly in the tent pole movie space.

    Also Reloaded is the best Matrix movie. Why are you booing me? I'm right.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on Alphabet’s drone delivery service Wing hits 100,000 deliveries milestone in ~tech

    deknalis
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    Ugh, I can only hope this doesn't take off (pun intended). The noise of a drone alone is unbearable, let alone the idea of private companies regularly using the airspace of private properties for...

    Ugh, I can only hope this doesn't take off (pun intended). The noise of a drone alone is unbearable, let alone the idea of private companies regularly using the airspace of private properties for profit.

    Get off my lawn.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on Detailed breakdown of new mechanics, systems, and enemies in Elden Ring in ~games

    deknalis
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    Fast traveling from any point outside dungeons, you love to see it. Also saw elsewhere that they were toning down corpse walking a bit. A bit worried about translating From's level design prowess...

    Fast traveling from any point outside dungeons, you love to see it. Also saw elsewhere that they were toning down corpse walking a bit. A bit worried about translating From's level design prowess to a more open world space but those QoL improvements might make this the first From game I genuinely enjoy and don't feel is pointlessly repetitive.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    deknalis
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    I've been watching Star Trek: The Next Generation, and it has thoroughly ruined all of the network political dramas (Scandal, Designated Survivor, etc.) that I previously used to passively enjoy...

    I've been watching Star Trek: The Next Generation, and it has thoroughly ruined all of the network political dramas (Scandal, Designated Survivor, etc.) that I previously used to passively enjoy whenever I visited my mom while she watched them. Not anything to do with the actual politics or moment to moment writing of it, but it's made me realize how many shows use the "everyone will think I'm crazy" or "no one will believe me so I have to go rogue" plot point really cheaply and nonsensically. On Next Generation, no matter how crazy something that one of the crew sees sounds, they immediately tell the captain, and are immediately believed. That degree of professionalism aboard essentially a future navy vessel shouldn't feel startling or radical but it kind of does. Now whenever the main character of one of those other shows calls up their boss and they totally refuse to believe them for one reason or another, I can't help but think, "They've saved your skin a dozen times by now, why are you still totally unwilling to at least entertain their idea?"

    5 votes
  5. Comment on You're probably not using the web's best browser (Vivaldi) in ~tech

    deknalis
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    I haven't used this new 4.0, but from previous use of Vivaldi it has the classic power user application problem: The vast majority of users need maybe 10% of the power user features (and I think...

    I haven't used this new 4.0, but from previous use of Vivaldi it has the classic power user application problem: The vast majority of users need maybe 10% of the power user features (and I think I'm being generous there) but have the clutter and complexity of all of them in things like settings.

    But I could be wrong, maybe they've figured out the perfect balance of being simple at a glance but being complex under the hood with the 4.0 release. I'll give it a download when I can.

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Pastry chef, Claire Saffitz, attempts to make gourmet Cadbury Creme Eggs | Gourmet Makes in ~food

    deknalis
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    There was something Cronenberg-esque about the blowing out of eggs at 6:39.

    There was something Cronenberg-esque about the blowing out of eggs at 6:39.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on Movie Monday Free Talk in ~movies

    deknalis
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    One of my favorite movies ever is Death by Hanging by Nagisa Oshima, so I've using the isolation time as a way to go through his filmography, among watching other things. His films are very...

    One of my favorite movies ever is Death by Hanging by Nagisa Oshima, so I've using the isolation time as a way to go through his filmography, among watching other things. His films are very unsubtly political and often very contemporary to the time he made them, he prefers to confront audiences with his arguments directly at points most of the time as opposed to burying his beliefs in metaphor and allegory.
    From the Oshimarathon:

    • Night and Fog in Japan (1960) - Essentially Oshima airing grievances of the self cannibalizing and exclusionary nature of Japan's student leftist movements. I don't agree with everything he says here but there's a lot of truth and experiences that I see myself and people I know in. As someone who wasn't super familiar with the era in politics, it does feel overwhelming at first, and this is an issue with a lot of Oshima movies, but I found it very compelling after I understood the dynamics in play a little better as it went on.
    • The Catch (1961) - He moves away from contemporary settings for the first time to make a movie set during World War 2, about a town in Japan that captures a black American pilot. It's almost like a thematic prequel to his other work such as Night and Fog, he basically uses a Japanese town plagued problems during the war as a space to explore the shattering of Japanese sense of "last man standing" patriotism and perceived betrayal by the state in some ways, and how it would create the sort of fractured Japan that he explores in movies like The Sun's Burial or Cruel Story of Youth. I think there's a real overabundance of characters dropped right in the audience's lap that hindered the ability to fully follow the movie the whole time for me, but it's still a very interesting work.
    • The Christian Revolt (1962) - Set in the Edo period of Japan, this one feels more like a Japanese Bergman film with the exploration of crisis of faith. While other filmmakers would have underlying hope and inspiration even in a doomed to fail rebellion, Oshima underscores everything with tragedy. It's sort of got that same feeling of being a thematic prequel as The Catch, with a story about hopeless rebellion against institutions and also sort of a tearing down of the "noble samurai" icon and revealing some of the truth behind the myth.
      This one was hard to find, at least with English subtitles, I dunno if it's even possible to buy it legally in the US. As such I uploaded it to YouTube for anyone who's curious.

    couple other non-Oshima related movies:

    • Boy and the World (2013) - Terrific little animated film. There's no (intelligible) dialogue, and the use of music both in its story and the actual craft makes it so you don't miss it at all. Much more confrontational about the effects of industrialization and exploitation of workers than I was expecting, but it was definitely a pleasant surprise.
    • The Exterminating Angel (1962) - My first Luis Buñuel directed movie, and I thought it was great. It's about a group of bourgeoisie that become mysteriously trapped in a room by some invisible force without explanation, and I thought it was a great sort of send-up or social order and decorum being based around projections and appearances rather than any real sense of superiority.
    2 votes
  8. Comment on Heart of an assassin: How Daniel Craig changed James Bond forever in ~movies

    deknalis
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    It's less "changing" Bond and more just "actually going back to the basics of Fleming's vision" instead of making Bond look like someone to be looked up to and admired. Casino Royale is...

    It's less "changing" Bond and more just "actually going back to the basics of Fleming's vision" instead of making Bond look like someone to be looked up to and admired. Casino Royale is essentially a movie about how he's not the perfect apex of manhood but basically a blunt instrument and his misogyny and nihilism is not some failure of systems of espionage but the logical and intended result of it.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on The quarantine playlist - A list of film recommendations about social distancing in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Let me know if I'm the weirdo, but while social distancing I've been itching to watch cabin fever based isolation horror, pandemic movies, movies about loneliness, and so on. So I put together...

    Let me know if I'm the weirdo, but while social distancing I've been itching to watch cabin fever based isolation horror, pandemic movies, movies about loneliness, and so on. So I put together this list of 40 movies that I think fit the characteristics of either being about a disease, the effects of isolation on the mind or body, the fear of what lurks in our own homes, being trapped with only a few people in an enclosed space, emotional distance and loneliness, and other effects self-quarantining might bring to mind. I tried to put in some non-horror in there but it's still pretty horror heavy, given how the theme of the list lends itself to the genre. I also tried to avoid overloading the list completely with zombie movies.

    Let me know what you think, feel free to ask for the logic about a certain pick, and of course recommend your own!

    1 vote
  10. Comment on A (comically late) Black History Month Watchlist in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Thank you very much! As for The Color Purple, my most unpopular film school opinion coming up: I don't like Spielberg very much, I find a lot of his work to be mawkish and transparently...

    Thank you very much!
    As for The Color Purple, my most unpopular film school opinion coming up: I don't like Spielberg very much, I find a lot of his work to be mawkish and transparently manipulative. I think The Color Purple falls into that trap as well, though parts of it do work for me.

    3 votes
  11. A (comically late) Black History Month Watchlist

    Yeah, so I know there's about a week and a half left in Black History Month (which is in February here, for the non-US and I believe Canada folks who didn't know), and this rec list is therefore...

    Yeah, so I know there's about a week and a half left in Black History Month (which is in February here, for the non-US and I believe Canada folks who didn't know), and this rec list is therefore super late, but I've been watching some movies that were historically significant in terms of breaking racial barriers at mainstream award shows like the Oscars and in film production at large, were pioneers in getting films from African nations famous and acclaimed worldwide, or just generally covered racial issues of their times in significant or compelling ways, and thought I'd post the watchlist here in case anyone was interested. So I guess either binge all these in the coming week and a half, keep this as a guide for next year, watch any of the ones that interest you past February, or save it for October, which is when I understand Black History Month takes place in the UK.

    • Within Our Gates (1920) - The first movie by an African American director to have a still surviving print.
    • Eleven P.M. (1928) - A silent era film led by a mostly black cast and directed by enigmatic little known African American director Richard Maurice. An absolutely bizarre surrealist melodrama.
    • Cry, The Beloved Country (1951) - This film examining the effects of apartheid in South Africa actually filmed almost entirely in segregated South Africa, possibly making it the first major film to do so.
    • The Defiant Ones (1958) - Sidney Poitier was the first black man to be nominated for Best Actor at the Oscars for his role in this film. Details the story of two escaped convicts, a white man and a black man, becoming friends, with more nuance and layering than its premise and time period might suggest.
    • One Potato, Two Potato (1964) - One of the first, and possibly the first, films to deal with interracial marriage in a serious manner. Predates Guess Who's Coming to Dinner by 3 years.
    • Nothing But a Man (1964) - Realistic depiction of life in a racist society, consisting of a constant soul-crushing barrage of minor aggressions instead of huge explosions of hate. Selected for preservation in the Library of Congress and considered to be an important example of neorealism.
    • Black Girl (1966) - One of the first African films by an African filmmaker to receive international attention and acclaim. Shows the lasting damage and effects of colonialism both in the colonized country and the lives of those displaced as a result of it.
    • In the Heat of the Night (1967) - Tackled racial tensions in the South in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
    • Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) - One of the few films of the time depicting interracial marriage in a positive light and a serious way. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
    • Black Panthers (1968) - Documents a small but significant moment in the history of the fight against racism in the US, the Free Huey movement championed by the Black Panthers.
    • Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) - Considered an important film in the history of African American cinema, and credited as one of the pioneers of the blaxploitation genre.
    • She's Gotta Have It (1986) - The debut film of famed director Spike Lee, an ahead of its time depiction of polyamory and female independence, it showed Brooklyn's black community in a light that drew media attention and focus to its artists and musicians following its release.
    • Daughters of the Dust (1991) - The first by an African American woman to gain a general theatrical release (in 1991!). Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
    • Malcolm X (1992) - A biopic of civil rights leader Malcolm X, also directed by Spike Lee. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
    • Girlhood (2014) - The film discusses and challenges conceptions of race, gender and class; Sciamma's goal was to capture the stories of black teenagers, characters she claims are generally underdeveloped in French films.
    • Moonlight (2016) - Barry Jenkins' meditation on black sense of masculinity and the struggles of LGBT members in the contemporary American black community became the first film with an all-black cast to win Best Picture at the Oscars.
    • Get Out (2017) - With this film exploring the exploitative horror of the modern white liberal brand of racism, Jordan Peele became the first black writer to win the Best Original Screenplay category at the Oscars, as well as the first to earn a Best Director nomination and a Best Picture nomination for a debut film.
    • The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) - A film that explores the gentrification of San Francisco and the struggles in personal identity that arise from it.

    I'd love to hear any feedback on the list or if you're gonna watch anything from it, and suggestions for any movies to add to it, especially between the 20s and 50s and the 90s and 00s, since those are especially massive gaps in my knowledge.

    8 votes
  12. Comment on Spiderverse Twitter account teases *something* for April 8, 2022 in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Just a general villain I'd like to see is Spot. I think his visual style with the fast pace and comic book in motion stylization of Spider-Verse would be visually incredible. As for Spider-People,...

    Just a general villain I'd like to see is Spot. I think his visual style with the fast pace and comic book in motion stylization of Spider-Verse would be visually incredible.
    As for Spider-People, Supaidaman for sure, and have him bring his giant robot.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Who's making good films? in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Neon is an indie distributor that's popped up in the last few years that's doing really interesting stuff imo. Ingrid Goes West, Colossal, [I, Tonya], 3 Identical Strangers, Apollo 11 (best movie...

    Neon is an indie distributor that's popped up in the last few years that's doing really interesting stuff imo. Ingrid Goes West, Colossal, [I, Tonya], 3 Identical Strangers, Apollo 11 (best movie of the year as far as I'm concerned). Their latest film is the US distribution of Parasite, which is fantastic. They will also be handling Portrait of a Lady on Fire later this year, which I'm extremely excited about.
    Netflix has also had a good year, and is a super convenient place to go for smaller films. They released Dear Ex, Paddleton, Burial of Kojo, High Flying Bird, Tell Me Who I Am, Super Deluxe, And Breathe Normally, Dolemite is my Name, and still have The Irishman, I Lost My Body, and Marriage Story coming up.

    As for filmmakers, I think Taika Waititi and Rian Johnson are making really good non-blockbuster but really engaging and accessible movies (except for their respective blockbusters of course). I'm super fond of Boy by Waititi, I think it showcases his talent for tragic comedy really well, it's hilarious but there's a real air of sadness to the atmosphere in the whole thing. Also a big fan of Hunt for the Wilderpeople, which is much more comedic and great at it. As of Johnson, I like Brick and Brothers Bloom, which feel like really satisfying and interesting examinations of their respective genres.
    James Gray has really impressed me recently with The Immigrant, Lost City of Z, and Ad Astra. Terrence Malick has A Hidden Life coming out soon, he's lost me with some of his more recent structureless work but that looks intriguing. Robert Eggers and Ari Aster seem to be interesting things with horror, really enjoyed The Lighthouse this year, Midsommar less so but still found it enjoyable.
    Jia Zhangke is someone I try to recommend often because I'm a huge fan, but his glacial pace isn't for everyone. He had Ash is Purest White release this year, but that's sort of a self examination swansong of a film, so I'd start somewhere else. Personally a big fan of Platform and The World (2004).
    Noah Baumbach is making great stuff imo, he has the aforementioned Marriage Story coming on Netflix, and Meyerowitz Stories is also on there.

    4 votes
  14. Comment on ‘OK boomer’ marks the end of friendly generational relations in ~life

    deknalis
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    Anyone care to refresh my memory on what the "friendly generational relations" were? Was it the parade of articles of what industries millennials were killing because of laziness?

    Anyone care to refresh my memory on what the "friendly generational relations" were? Was it the parade of articles of what industries millennials were killing because of laziness?

    40 votes
  15. Comment on The Pixel 4’s 90Hz display only works at high brightness levels in ~tech

    deknalis
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    Google's own Pixel 3A has terrific battery life in my use. I can get 6-8 hours of screen on time per charge, get through 2-3 days if I'm not intensive. And it also has a headphone jack. The 3A...

    Google's own Pixel 3A has terrific battery life in my use. I can get 6-8 hours of screen on time per charge, get through 2-3 days if I'm not intensive. And it also has a headphone jack.
    The 3A seems to be the only Pixel worth buying at the moment.

  16. Comment on El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie - Discussion Thread in ~movies

    deknalis
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    Personally, I really liked it. I think the notching down of tension from the later seasons of Breaking Bad was a great choice, I was really afraid it would be a manhunt movie (which it partially...

    Personally, I really liked it. I think the notching down of tension from the later seasons of Breaking Bad was a great choice, I was really afraid it would be a manhunt movie (which it partially was in the loosest sense I suppose, there is a manhunt element present, but it's not the focus). Aaron Paul was terrific and just letting Jesse exist in a world without Walter White, just reflect on his past and try to move past his trauma was a good choice imo. Seeing Paul jump from beginner "Yeah bitch" Jesse, to beaten down prisoner Jesse, and finally to a Jesse taking command of his own life and doing whatever he can to get a fresh start was brilliant. There's a real catharsis to seeing a character so beaten down finally get a real conclusion, and to see him try his absolute best to avoid confrontation, to see him understand that the best thing to do is leave it all behind. And the scene between him and Walt, which I dreaded thinking it would be empty fan service, turned out to be a great moment. It showed Walt was in it for the recognition and power right from the start, but also there is still that legitimate relationship between the two of them, with Walt encouraging Jesse to independence and autonomy before he ends up taking control of Jesse's life, and Jesse caring about Walt's motives, unaware how selfish he was/would become. Beautifully tragic and a great bookend to both Walt and Jesse's characters.
    The big hindrance I think the movie has is the welder. I think it's clear that they wanted some direct confrontation of Jesse's captors, but Todd and Uncle Jack had already been killed and so they needed to invent someone. But even then, since it is more about Jesse moving on then Jesse getting revenge, I didn't find it to be a big issue.

    7 votes
  17. Comment on Joker - Discussion Thread (Spoilers) in ~movies

    deknalis
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    I think the core of it, the failing of a city for one guy creating that city's reckoning, is compelling (though only because Phoenix is good and it's a comic book city that can be over the top and...

    I think the core of it, the failing of a city for one guy creating that city's reckoning, is compelling (though only because Phoenix is good and it's a comic book city that can be over the top and a little silly, there's still some really clunky dialogue and on the nose scenes), but anytime it tried to be an Important Movie it seemed kinda bad.
    It seems to pretend it's made commentary on the treatment of the downtrodden and the mentally ill, but it furthers the vilification of mental illness by using generic vague "crazy person" traits, and mocking a dwarf character through its framing. I get that Joker and Gary were supposed to be kindred spirits because of their ostracization and mockery from society at large, but Gary's plight is framed comedically too much for that to work imo. Could just be Phillips being used to directing comedy and therefore not fully being able to stage those moments dramatically.
    The rest of its themes seemed vague and contradictory. "Eat the rich, look how billionaires disregard those under them, Wayne threw away his own child for appearances." "Oh Arthur's mom is just crazy actually, Wayne was right to distance himself." Violent revolution is framed as a negative, the aristocratic high society is framed as a negative, and the guy calling for people to be nice is a violent killer (though also not fully accountanble for his actions because of being cut off from medication, muddling it all further). Empty framing of all sides as bad, polsturing as if there's a statement being made but without saying anything. The only thematic through line that seems to persist unmuddled is the idea of life as cruel absurdity, and therefore embracing of said absurdity being the only way to affect change or make sense of life. But I had to sit through an hour and a half of the movie pretending it would say something more meaningful than that, and it just seems like an excuse for empty escapism. Almost like a bad punchline, which is fitting I suppose.

    6 votes
  18. Comment on Spider-Man will stay in the Marvel Cinematic Universe in ~movies

    deknalis
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    I wonder if creative gridlock from both parties was a major factor in this agreement. Far From Home makes Spider-Man such a huge part of the universe, and consequently ties so much of his story to...

    I wonder if creative gridlock from both parties was a major factor in this agreement. Far From Home makes Spider-Man such a huge part of the universe, and consequently ties so much of his story to the universe at large, that it seems impossible to cleanly separate everything out without at least one more shared movie.

    2 votes