22 votes

The new Windows Terminal

26 comments

  1. Apos Link
    https://github.com/microsoft/Terminal This summer, you will be able to get it from the Windows Store or GitHub (If you have Developer Mode enabled to sideload apps.). You can also build it...

    https://github.com/microsoft/Terminal

    This summer, you will be able to get it from the Windows Store or GitHub (If you have Developer Mode enabled to sideload apps.). You can also build it yourself right now if you feel like it.

    It's nice to see a promo video like that for a terminal application.

    More info: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/commandline/introducing-windows-terminal/

    One of the dev answered a bunch of questions in a reddit thread: https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/blewqm/microsoft_unveils_windows_terminal_a_new_command/emo5uz2/

    13 votes
  2. [9]
    cfabbro (edited ) Link
    Okay, that is honestly pretty sexy, especially the tabbed shells. /noise Incidentally I have been using WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) for about a year now, and have really come to appreciate...

    Okay, that is honestly pretty sexy, especially the tabbed shells. /noise

    Incidentally I have been using WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) for about a year now, and have really come to appreciate it. I still can't quite bring myself to migrate away from Windows, but it's been really nice to be able to dip my toes in the Linux world directly through Windows without having to muck about with dual-booting or using VMs. At some point I will likely take the plunge to Linux full-time, but for now this feels like the best of both worlds and it's clearly only going to get better based on the recent announcements regarding Windows Terminal and WSL 2.0.

    p.s. Kudos to MS for doing this, especially since it's a bit counterproductive for them as it may lead to more people getting comfortable with Linux and eventually migrating away from Windows entirely as well.

    7 votes
    1. [8]
      gpl Link Parent
      I'm curious what the main hold-up is re: making the switch to Linux. I'm assuming you've considered dual booting and decided against it? I ask because I was in a similar situation a few years ago...

      I'm curious what the main hold-up is re: making the switch to Linux. I'm assuming you've considered dual booting and decided against it? I ask because I was in a similar situation a few years ago and I have to say I have not regretted it at all. If I was still very into gaming I could see having more reservations than I do, but my laptop isn't even that great for that application anyway.

      1 vote
      1. [4]
        hamstergeddon Link Parent
        Not who you replied to, but here are the two big reasons for me to stay on Windows: We use Office 365 at work and having native software rather than depending on the browser for that stuff is a...

        Not who you replied to, but here are the two big reasons for me to stay on Windows:

        1. We use Office 365 at work and having native software rather than depending on the browser for that stuff is a great convenience. We also use Teams for chat and meetings and while there are a few 3rd party Linux solutions, none of them beat the native experience. For example, screensharing outright doesn't work on Linux and notifications are non-existent. Also accessing Exchange stuff via Thunderbird or other email software on Linux is a pain in the ass. Outlook in the browser is surprisingly great, but still I'd prefer native.
        2. I'm on a work-provided laptop and while we're free to put whatever we want on it, my laptop only has a single HDMI output, so I'm stuck with a single monitor (plus the laptop's, but it's so small and awkward to use). On Windows I can plug in a $35 USB->VGA adapter and it just works. On Linux that cheap adapter doesn't work and while the go-to solution is DisplayLink, that's a colossal mixed bag. The devices are expensive, they made my laptop really unstable, and there's no guarantee it'll work until you try it out. I believe this is largely because of the dual GPU setup of most modern laptops (which is its own nightmare on linux, let me tell you!)

        I love Linux. I've used Ubuntu and Manjaro long-term on that laptop and I really enjoyed the freedom, but it came at the expense of too many conveniences. Windows 10 (once properly configured and liberal use of PiHole is applied) isn't that bad, plus anything I absolutely need linux for can be accomplished with a VM or WSL.

        6 votes
        1. [2]
          sxo Link Parent
          Optimus laptop? Had to do some of kernel parameter trickery even to get Manjaro/Ubuntu to boot, thankfully more recent kernels fixed the problem. No more choosing whether I wanted to use hotkeys...

          Optimus laptop? Had to do some of kernel parameter trickery even to get Manjaro/Ubuntu to boot, thankfully more recent kernels fixed the problem. No more choosing whether I wanted to use hotkeys or elantech touchpad :) acpi_osi=! acpi_osi='Windows 2012' acpi_backlight=vendor fuck that..

          Also fuck Nvidia with their EGLStream or whateverthefuck was problem with Wayland support.

          Now I got a desktop with RX580 with no problems thanks to amdgpu drivers for gaming, and a T460 for laptop I'm using right and I'm so much happier. Now when they get Steam Link working with Linux I'll be able to game even on this laptop!

          5 votes
          1. hamstergeddon Link Parent
            YEP! I could boot into the installer for Ubuntu and Manjaro fine, run it fine, but when it tried to boot into the OS it would completely freeze. By the end of it, the solution wasn't that...

            YEP! I could boot into the installer for Ubuntu and Manjaro fine, run it fine, but when it tried to boot into the OS it would completely freeze. By the end of it, the solution wasn't that complicated, but finding it was a nightmare. I didn't know it was called "Optimus", so googling and trying out a dozen different incorrect solutions devoured an entire evening.

            I'd kill to be on a desktop where this crap isn't a problem. I've been using Linux (mostly Ubuntu) for 10-15 years now and it wasn't until this laptop that I ever had a problem getting it installed and running on a device.

            3 votes
        2. gpl Link Parent
          Both of those are absolutely valid, I still have a windows install on my laptop exactly for when I need to log on to use Office. I was mainly asking because I know that I personally was much more...

          Both of those are absolutely valid, I still have a windows install on my laptop exactly for when I need to log on to use Office. I was mainly asking because I know that I personally was much more apprehensive than I needed to be about switching, and there's not as much on Windows that I absolutely need as I initially thought.

          2 votes
      2. cfabbro (edited ) Link Parent
        It's mostly just little things that keep me from migrating to Linux yet, like not quite being comfortable with the environment and some software I rely on not really being available on it....

        It's mostly just little things that keep me from migrating to Linux yet, like not quite being comfortable with the environment and some software I rely on not really being available on it. Primarily, as @hamstergeddon touched on, Office 365 + OneDrive, which I use and that still require hacky BS to get working on Linux. But I also have a rather over-the-top computer setup (there is also a 5th 37" TV/monitor on the wall to my left as well), that is a PITA to get working properly on Linux as well. The only distros where it worked out of the gate without a bunch of tinkering was Ubuntu and Manjaro, but even they have some niggling issues with it as well, so it's not perfect.

        p.s. I did dual-boot to Manjaro KDE+i3 for a while, but I eventually got rid of that and stuck with WSL instead, since it guarantees Office365+Onedrive and my monitor setup work perfectly, amongst other things, but still allows me to play around with Linux relatively painlessly too. Best of both worlds... although some Linux stuff is still a bit wonky in WSL. I am hoping some of that gets ironed out in WSL 2.0 though.

        3 votes
      3. sxo Link Parent
        Also with Proton & DXVK translation layer non-native games are working better every day! Not to mention the native clients even for (insert Jim Sterling AAA groan) games are becoming more common....

        Also with Proton & DXVK translation layer non-native games are working better every day! Not to mention the native clients even for (insert Jim Sterling AAA groan) games are becoming more common. With indie games it seems like it's almost a given nowadays.

        2 votes
      4. Elronnd Link Parent
        Not the GP, but the linux driver for my wifi card crashes (actually, it makes the scheduler crash, somehow).

        Not the GP, but the linux driver for my wifi card crashes (actually, it makes the scheduler crash, somehow).

        1 vote
  3. [3]
    Silbern Link
    Maybe it's just me, but did anyone else think that it looks oddly skeuomorphic / glossy? Particularly on the tabs. May just be the video, but that looks like something I could have seen gone in...

    Maybe it's just me, but did anyone else think that it looks oddly skeuomorphic / glossy? Particularly on the tabs. May just be the video, but that looks like something I could have seen gone in Aero 10 years ago. I'd be thrilled to see Microsoft move back towards that kind of style, I've gotten so sick of flat design over the last couple years.

    6 votes
    1. [2]
      emdash (edited ) Link Parent
      Honestly, Microsoft is its own worst enemy when it comes to "flat design". Those start menu tiles & modern control panel interface are honestly awful—with their jagged edges & abstract controls....

      Honestly, Microsoft is its own worst enemy when it comes to "flat design". Those start menu tiles & modern control panel interface are honestly awful—with their jagged edges & abstract controls. It feels deflated & empty of personality.

      The tile concept worked really great when it was Windows Mobile on a glossy, vibrant smartphone screen, but it's just miserable on anything larger than a tablet. What's worse is that it's only a shim over about half a dozen other UI designs that continue to reside in the Windows codebase. I would be very happy to see them all replaced with something more humane & bubbly. It doesn't have to be Vista-levels of gloss & transparency, but right now it's depressing & a bore to use.

      7 votes
      1. hamstergeddon Link Parent
        Everything feels so inefficiently sized and spaced, too. For example, I'm on a 1920x1200 monitor and I have to scroll vertically when using the Display Manager. That's ridiculous. The old UI had...

        Everything feels so inefficiently sized and spaced, too. For example, I'm on a 1920x1200 monitor and I have to scroll vertically when using the Display Manager. That's ridiculous. The old UI had the settings tabbed so it was all self-contained in a sanely sized window. They could've easily implemented a tabbed system here as well, even while keeping the display settings tucked inside the overall Settings app.

        7 votes
  4. [6]
    gpl Link
    I am liking Microsoft more and more these days. Makes me somewhat glad I kept the Windows partition on my laptop. Also, imagine telling someone even five years ago that this would be a big...

    I am liking Microsoft more and more these days. Makes me somewhat glad I kept the Windows partition on my laptop. Also, imagine telling someone even five years ago that this would be a big Microsoft announcement in the near future. And imagine telling someone 15 years ago about this hip and sleek commercial for a Linux system. I'll have to boot up my windows and check it out (a little pointless coming from Arch, but still cool!).

    1 vote
    1. [5]
      sxo Link Parent
      I still feel like it's the same old scam, we're at Embrace phase now. What we're those two other ones again... e: Or maybe Extend. Now let's see if the hammer drops.

      I still feel like it's the same old scam, we're at Embrace phase now. What we're those two other ones again...

      e: Or maybe Extend. Now let's see if the hammer drops.

      3 votes
      1. [4]
        papasquat Link Parent
        I've heard this said a lot. If that's the case, we've been at the embrace phase for five years now, which would be the longest it's ever lasted in MS history. The fact that the person responsible...

        I've heard this said a lot. If that's the case, we've been at the embrace phase for five years now, which would be the longest it's ever lasted in MS history. The fact that the person responsible for that strategy is gone, and the fact that MS has actual, real competition in OSX, which is getting more and more walled off and closed as windows goes the opposite direction kind of leads me to believe that this really isn't what's happening here.

        More likely, MS knows that if it doesn't open up and work with developers, they'll cease to be relevant when traditional computers stop being purchased by normal consumers.

        1 vote
        1. [3]
          sxo Link Parent
          Really? Wasn't Windows 10 with their MS store/UWP and DX11 exclusivity shit just a giant leap towards the walled garden approach?

          which is getting more and more walled off and closed as windows goes the opposite direction kind of leads me to believe that this really isn't what's happening here.

          Really? Wasn't Windows 10 with their MS store/UWP and DX11 exclusivity shit just a giant leap towards the walled garden approach?

          1 vote
          1. moocow1452 Link Parent
            Windows Store started in Windows 8, and they seem to be mostly keeping the lights on for apps, focusing on movies, TV and games, games that have been also showing up on Steam, Mac OS and Switch....

            Windows Store started in Windows 8, and they seem to be mostly keeping the lights on for apps, focusing on movies, TV and games, games that have been also showing up on Steam, Mac OS and Switch. As far as DX11, that seems to be more a thing to get people off Windows 7, since they are supporting Vulkan APIs and are really pushing people off of Windows 7.

            2 votes
          2. babypuncher Link Parent
            I don't think it is realistic to expect them to backport new APIs to older versions. No OS vendor does that. The MS store isn't any more closed off or walled-garden-y than Android. There's nothing...

            I don't think it is realistic to expect them to backport new APIs to older versions. No OS vendor does that.

            The MS store isn't any more closed off or walled-garden-y than Android. There's nothing stopping you from sideloading UWP apps or using good old fashioned Win32 apps. If MS really does kill Win32 support, then there will literally be no reason for anyone to use Windows anymore.

            2 votes
  5. [7]
    weystrom Link
    Cool stuff. Can you completely disable telemetry and cortana on Windows these days, or is it still an issue?

    Cool stuff. Can you completely disable telemetry and cortana on Windows these days, or is it still an issue?

    1 vote
    1. Apos Link Parent
      I turned it off, but it was rather complicated. I'd consider it still an issue. Also an update can turn it back on at any time (I don't think that has happened to me yet.).

      I turned it off, but it was rather complicated. I'd consider it still an issue. Also an update can turn it back on at any time (I don't think that has happened to me yet.).

      4 votes
    2. [4]
      sxo Link Parent
      You can but they sure haven't made it easy. Not sure if they still try to re-enable them after every update.

      You can but they sure haven't made it easy. Not sure if they still try to re-enable them after every update.

      2 votes
      1. [3]
        hamstergeddon Link Parent
        There's always O&O ShutUp10 to handle it all from one place. Just be sure to run it periodically to make sure updates didn't re-enable stuff. I couple that with PiHole to minimize Window 10's...

        There's always O&O ShutUp10 to handle it all from one place. Just be sure to run it periodically to make sure updates didn't re-enable stuff. I couple that with PiHole to minimize Window 10's nonsense.

        1 vote
        1. sxo Link Parent
          Thanks, I'll try to remember this the next time I fail to convince someone to switch to Linux :)

          Thanks, I'll try to remember this the next time I fail to convince someone to switch to Linux :)

          2 votes
        2. Eabryt Link Parent
          Man, I really need to set up PiHole now that I've got a house. I have so many old Raspberry Pi's just sitting around.

          Man, I really need to set up PiHole now that I've got a house. I have so many old Raspberry Pi's just sitting around.

          2 votes
    3. teaearlgraycold Link Parent
      Only by default on Windows 10 LTSB. I run it without any issue.

      Only by default on Windows 10 LTSB. I run it without any issue.