16 votes

Let's Share Recipes!

With Pepperplate.com moving their service to an overpriced subscription (queue the exodus), I've been moving some key recipes over to Paprika¹, I figured it'd be a good time to ask for some decent recipes.

Tuck your recipe and method in a <details> with a good <summary> so the thread is easy to browse.

I'll get us started!

Coconut-Braised Chicken with Chorizo and Potatoes This comes from [Food and Wine Magazine](https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/coconut-braised-chicken-chorizo-and-potatoes)

INGREDIENTS

Chicken

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 6 whole chicken legs (2 pounds)
  • Kosher salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 pound fresh Mexican chorizo
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 dried chile de árbol, broken in half
  • 3 cups unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 pound baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for serving
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Gremolata

  • 1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro, plus sprigs
  • 7 coffee beans, finely crushed (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lime zest

METHOD

Make the chicken

  • Preheat the oven to 425°. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat the oil. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Working in 2 batches, brown the chicken over moderate heat, turning occasionally, about 8 minutes per batch. Transfer the chicken to a large plate. Add the chorizo and onion to the casserole and cook, stirring to break up the meat, until the onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ginger, garlic and chile and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, potatoes and chicken to the casserole and bring to a simmer. Cover and braise in the oven for about 1 hour, until the chicken is cooked through. Stir in the lime juice and butter and season with salt.

Make the Gremolata

  • In a small bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix well. Make sure the cilantro and lime zest is fairly dry, but not dehydrated.

Plating

  • Spoon the braised chicken and potatoes into shallow bowls. Garnish with the gremolata 
and cilantro sprigs and serve with lime wedges.
Gordon Ramsay's Stupid Simple Broccoli Soup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large or two medium broccoli clusters (as fresh as possible)
  • Salt (3 tsp.)
  • Ground Black Pepper (4-5 turns on the grind wheel)
  • Water
  • Olive Oil
  • Goat Cheese (2 slices per bowl, preferably 'ashed')
  • Walnuts (about 5 per bowl)

METHOD

Cutting the Cheese

  • You will want to slice your goat cheese at this point
  • Dip the knife into the boiling hot water before each slice for even smooth cuts. Cut two slices of goat cheese per bowl being served. I like them about 5mm or so thick.
  • After cutting, use the hot smooth side of your knife to smooth one side of the cheese slices for appearance.

The Soup

  • Your broccoli is finished cooking when you can pierce it with little or no effort. Remove the stock pan from the stove burner.

DO NOT POUR THE WATER OUT!

  • Use a slotted spoon to add broccoli to a blender but be careful because it's boiling hot!
  • Pour enough of the water left over from cooking the broccoli to fill the blender half way.
  • Add a pinch (or more) of salt.
  • Use several pulses on your blender to break the broccoli up and then puree for several seconds.

Plating

  • Add five walnuts to the bottom of a shallow bowl and then place pieces of goat cheese on top of them.
  • Pour soup into shallow bowl around the cheese, not on it. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and serve at once!
Miso-Squash Soup with Sesame-Ginger Apples This is from [SeriousEats](https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/10/miso-squash-soup-recipe.html) and is another super simple soup that is always a hit.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 quarts plus 2 cups water, divided, plus more as needed
  • 1/2 ounce kombu (approximately a 4- by 6-inch piece; see note)
  • 1/2 ounce grated bonito flakes (about 3 cups; see note)
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 leek, white and light green parts only, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 2 medium carrots, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 (1 1/2-inch) knobs ginger, 1 knob peeled and thinly sliced, 1 knob peeled and finely grated, divided
  • 1 (2-pound) squash, such as kuri, kabocha, or butternut, peeled, seeded, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons white or red miso paste
  • 1 tablespoon fresh juice from 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • Pinch sugar, if needed
  • 1 large crisp apple, such as Fuji, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 1 large or 2 medium scallions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced on the bias
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • Shichimi togarashi, optional

METHOD

  • Combine 1 1/2 quarts water, kombu, and bonito flakes in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a bare simmer and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool for 5 minutes, then strain through a fine-mesh strainer. Discard solids and set dashi aside.
  • In a large Dutch oven or soup pot, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add leek, carrot, garlic, and sliced ginger. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are glistening and just starting to turn tender, about 4 minutes.
  • Add squash and pour just enough dashi on top to cover vegetables. Bring to a simmer and cook until vegetables are fully tender, about 30 minutes. Using a standing blender or immersion blender, and working in batches if necessary, blend soup until very smooth. Blend in miso and lemon juice.
  • Return soup to pot and thin with enough water to reach a pourable, silky-smooth consistency. Season with salt, add sugar to taste, and keep warm.
  • Meanwhile, fill a medium bowl with 2 cups water and 1 teaspoon kosher salt. Add diced apple and let soak for 10 minutes. Drain apple well, then return to bowl. Toss with grated ginger, scallions, toasted sesame seeds, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and remaining 1 teaspoon vegetable oil. Season with salt, if needed.
  • To serve, ladle hot soup into bowls and top with the apple-scallion salad. Garnish with shichimi togarashi, if desired.

¹Paprika is an overpriced recipe organizer -- paprikaapp.com -- it's okay, but also kind of lame.

19 comments

  1. [4]
    cfabbro
    (edited )
    Link
    Sort of off-topic, but if you're looking for a pepperplate/paprika alternative (and happen to use iOS), my family and I have been using Mealboard for a few years now and it's fantastic. It's a one...

    Sort of off-topic, but if you're looking for a pepperplate/paprika alternative (and happen to use iOS), my family and I have been using Mealboard for a few years now and it's fantastic. It's a one time ~$4 purchase, has family sharing support for up to 6 additional users, no subscription fee or in-app purchases, and is similarly fully featured. It has a calendar based meal planner, automatic shopping list creator which you can then send to others via email or SMS, a categorized pantry stock tracker, a categorized recipe list manager with a really solid web recipe import function that barely ever requires any manual editing of the imported data, and also has automatic sync between devices. I highly recommend it.

    5 votes
    1. tomf
      Link Parent
      Well, that looks and sounds perfect! Thanks!

      Well, that looks and sounds perfect! Thanks!

      3 votes
    2. [2]
      kemosabe
      Link Parent
      Since we're going off-topic, would it be ok for me to push my own recipe website here? It's more focused on recipe sharing and recipe scaling than personal use, and the recipe editor takes getting...

      Since we're going off-topic, would it be ok for me to push my own recipe website here? It's more focused on recipe sharing and recipe scaling than personal use, and the recipe editor takes getting used to but it's mine so I love it. :) I always love to hear feedback. www.convergencemenu.com.

      3 votes
      1. tomf
        Link Parent
        Can you post one or two of your favorite recipes as a base level comment? Your site looks sweet.

        Can you post one or two of your favorite recipes as a base level comment? Your site looks sweet.

        2 votes
  2. [2]
    acdw
    Link
    Here's a recipe for Vegan Bolognese. I've made it many times and it's always gone over well! Ingredients 2 T olive oil 1 onion, chopped 1 carrot, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 T ea. basil,...

    Here's a recipe for Vegan Bolognese. I've made it many times and it's always gone over well!

    Ingredients


    2 T olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    1 carrot, chopped
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 T ea. basil, oregano, thyme
    1 bay leaf
    1 t red pepper flakes
    1 c textured vegetable protein
    2 T soy sauce or liquid aminos
    1 c vegetable broth
    6-oz can tomato paste
    28-oz can crushed tomatoes


    Method

    Saute onions and carrots in oil on medium heat in a large pot for
    5 minutes, or until they begin to soften. Season with salt, pepper, and
    Italian herbs; mix well and add oil if the pan is dry. Add garlic and
    stir until fragrant. If cooking pasta, start the water now.

    Add the TVP dry and stir to coat. Quickly add the soy sauce and
    vegetable broth to rehydrate it. Stir to coat the TVP well, scraping the
    side of the pan. Simmer for 2 minutes.

    Add tomato paste, mix, and cook for a minute or two. Add crushed
    tomatoes
    and stir to distribute.

    Simmer the sauce until it's done or until the pasta's done.

    3 votes
    1. milkbones_4_bigelow
      Link Parent
      Sounds delicious, will look forward to trying this out next weekend :)

      Sounds delicious, will look forward to trying this out next weekend :)

      2 votes
  3. pvik
    (edited )
    Link
    This is going to be a little off topic. I seldom follow recipes and this may be because of how I learned to cook. From my mother. She never has set amount of ingredients but adds ingredients and...

    This is going to be a little off topic.

    I seldom follow recipes and this may be because of how I learned to cook. From my mother. She never has set amount of ingredients but adds ingredients and tastes and adjusts, recently I noticed I do this a lot too.

    This method works really well for making Asian dishes (like Chinese, Indian, Thai, Korean, etc) too. I have a framework on how to make a dish a specific way, like Indian curry, Korean bul-kogi, etc.

    So instead of a set recipe, here is a framework I use for making Indian styled curry. Welcome to my very disorganized method of cooking :)

    To marinate the chicken mix the following powders together first:
    salt, turmeric powder, coriander powder , cumin powder, chili powder. Minced garlic and ginger (or ginger/garlic paste or even powder)
    Use Indian chili powder [1] if available, if not ground paprika or cayenne works well too.

    If you want your end dish to be more dry ; mix the above powder with lime juice well and mix in with chicken.
    If not, you can add some plain yogurt to the powder and mix it into a paste and then mix in chicken with it.

    Tips:

    • I generally prefer bone-in chicken thighs for Indian curry, but any chicken cut should work.
    • I also prefer to marinate the chicken for at least an hour, preferable overnight in the fridge.
      I generally buy meat once a month and prep meal sized portions, into zip-lock back along with different spices for different dishes and freeze them. So I can easily thaw a bag of marinated meat for dinner!

    For most Indian dishes, You start with heating up some vegetable oil, once the oil is hot.
    Add the following:

    • Red pepper flakes
    • A little fresh ground pepper
    • green Thai chilies (or even Serrano or jalapeno) (if available)
    • fresh minced garlic
    • fresh minced ginger
    • cloves (optional)
    • cinnamon stick (optional)
    • ground nutmeg (optional)

    Tips:

    • mix and match the above list to change the base flavor profile, experimenting with it.
    • If not using chicken, and making a vegetable based curry, you could also add curry leaves, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, and experiment!

    Once you have added the above spice blend to the hot oil and the minced garlic is starting to golden brown, add in diced onions.
    Saute the onions till they become translucent. Once translucent add in powdered spices, the base spices you used to marinate the chicken: turmeric, chili, coriander, cumin and salt.

    Continue sauteing and mix in the spices till the onions are cooked.

    If you want your end curry to be more liquid-y, add in chopped tomatoes and cook them well, if you want it to be more dry, skip the tomatoes.

    Then add in the marinated chicken and mix in well. Now add in some chicken stock (or water if you don't have any stock) with some tomato paste (if available) and mix in well and turn the heat up and mix well and cook closed till the chicken is cooked.

    Once chicken is cooked, cook on medium heat till the curry is reduced the the consistency you like.

    Finish off with some fresh cilantro and/or mint leaves :)

    Tip:

    • You can replace the above recipe with a vegetable mix like green-beans, cauliflower, carrots, etc too.
    • The curry would go well with some white rice (long grained, ponni, jasmine, etc, avoid short grained rice for Indian curries)
    • making unleavened bread with wheat or all-purpose flour is fairly easy as well, which goes very well with Indian curries, or just buy pita bread or corn tortilla from you local grocery store
    • if you have a Indian/Asian store near where you live, you should be able to get the base Indian spice mix (turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder and chili powder) for fairly cheap and should last you a while.
    3 votes
  4. [10]
    kemosabe
    Link
    Okay my turn (thanks to @tomf for the prompting). Chocolate and Blueberry Muffins This is my go-to recipe for food-sharing events. Reliable and delicious. Dry ingredients: 2 cups flour 4 tsp...

    Okay my turn (thanks to @tomf for the prompting).

    Chocolate and Blueberry Muffins This is my go-to recipe for food-sharing events. Reliable and delicious.

    Dry ingredients:

    • 2 cups flour
    • 4 tsp baking powder
    • 0.5 cups sugar

    Wet ingredients:

    • An egg
    • 1 tsp vanilla essence/1 packet of vanilla sugar
    • A cup of milk
    • 100g (3.5oz) melted butter

    The stars of the show:

    • A cup of frozen blueberries
    • A cup of chopped-up pieces of cooking chocolate

    Instructions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (~390°F).
    2. Melt butter on the stove (low heat).
    3. Sift dry ingredients into a large bowl.
    4. Add wet ingredients and mix well.
    5. Add chocolate and frozen blueberries, and stir until evenly mixed.
    6. Scoop the purple goop mix into muffin forms (I recommend the silicone ones).
    7. Place in center of oven and bake for 25 mins, give or take.

    Recipe link: https://www.convergencemenu.com/recipe.xhtml?author=marco&recipe=Chocolate+and+Blueberry+Muffins

    Pavlova The Kiwi classic: light, fluffy, sweet and delicious. The only downside is you have to do something creative with the remaining egg yolks.

    Ingredients:

    • 6 egg whites
    • 2 cups castor sugar
    • 2 tsp vanilla essence or vanilla sugar
    • 1 Tbsp cornflour
    • 1 Tbsp vinegar

    Topping:

    • 200 ml (0.7 cups) cream
    • 2 pieces of kiwifruit
    • A banana
    • Blueberries? Strawberries? It all works.

    Instructions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 110ºC (~230°F).
    2. Separate the eggs. Beat for about 30 secs until it's a 'glossy froth'.
    3. Beat on high speed, and add the sugar gradually. It will become a thick paste after a while.
    4. Sift in the vanilla, cornflour and vinegar. Beat.
    5. Put baking paper down on the tray. Scoop the Pav mix into a big heap in the middle of the baking paper.
    6. Put it in the centre of the oven for about two hours.
    7. After two hours turn the oven off but don't open that door. It needs to cool slowly. Leave the Pav in there until it's cool.

    To serve, lather it with whipped cream and cover it with kiwifruit slices. Job well done.
    Recipe link: https://www.convergencemenu.com/recipe.xhtml?author=marco&recipe=Pavlova

    Self-promotional link to my other favourite recipes (erhem, on my website): https://www.convergencemenu.com/recipebook.xhtml?recipebook=Marco's+Recipes

    2 votes
    1. [9]
      tomf
      Link Parent
      holy smokes! it's been YEARS since I've had pavlova! Thanks for this!

      holy smokes! it's been YEARS since I've had pavlova! Thanks for this!

      2 votes
      1. [8]
        cfabbro
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        I also noticed the Gnocchi recipe on @kemosabe's site... which similarly reminded me how long it's been since I made+ate some for myself. And damn... now I'm suddenly craving it! :P Gnocchi in...

        I also noticed the Gnocchi recipe on @kemosabe's site... which similarly reminded me how long it's been since I made+ate some for myself. And damn... now I'm suddenly craving it! :P

        Gnocchi in Alfredo sauce with black pepper, or coated in some proper pine-nut pesto = Yum.

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          tomf
          Link Parent
          We’re definitely on the same page there. For ages I was making all of my own pasta. I should get back into it. Gnocchi will be a delicious start. By the way, that app rules. I’ve been adding...

          We’re definitely on the same page there. For ages I was making all of my own pasta. I should get back into it. Gnocchi will be a delicious start.

          By the way, that app rules. I’ve been adding recipes through the site. It’s not the prettiest thing, but it definitely does its job.

          1 vote
          1. [2]
            cfabbro
            Link Parent
            I don't generally make my own pasta or noodles, since it's often a PITA and the store bought "fresh" or dehydrated stuff is usually "good enough" and priced right, but gnocchi is just so damn easy...

            I don't generally make my own pasta or noodles, since it's often a PITA and the store bought "fresh" or dehydrated stuff is usually "good enough" and priced right, but gnocchi is just so damn easy it's the exception.

            And glad to hear the app is working out for you! LOL, yeah, it's definitely not the prettiest (it was way worse when I first started using it ;), but with so much information to manage and display, making that all look pretty is kinda hard, so it's forgivable. It's utilitarian looking but works well though, and that's all that really matters to me in the end.

            1 vote
            1. tomf
              Link Parent
              I think my favorite part about making pasta is the hour or two I spend doing it, then the eight minutes it takes for everybody to eat it... and when I say, 'I made this fresh!' and they respond...

              I think my favorite part about making pasta is the hour or two I spend doing it, then the eight minutes it takes for everybody to eat it... and when I say, 'I made this fresh!' and they respond with, 'it tastes like it came from a box!' --- wait.. yeah. This is why I stopped making pasta. :)

              And really, the fresh pasta I make (generally speaking) will only be at best 25% better than the box.

              1 vote
        2. [4]
          kemosabe
          Link Parent
          Nice! I usually do a gorgonzola sauce for gnocchi. I think it's basically gorgonzola, cream and black pepper but can consult the book if you want it.

          Nice! I usually do a gorgonzola sauce for gnocchi. I think it's basically gorgonzola, cream and black pepper but can consult the book if you want it.

          1 vote
          1. [3]
            cfabbro
            Link Parent
            Sure, if you wouldn't mind I would love to see your sauce recipe. I have had Gorgonzola sauce on pasta before at restaurants, but never actually made it myself and honestly have no idea what's in...

            Sure, if you wouldn't mind I would love to see your sauce recipe. I have had Gorgonzola sauce on pasta before at restaurants, but never actually made it myself and honestly have no idea what's in it either (other than the cheese). :P

            1. [2]
              kemosabe
              Link Parent
              Hm, I dug through my cookbook but didn't find it. I guess I just google it when I want. This recipe is pretty close, though being practical/lazy I simplify it somewhat. Ingredients: butter (any...

              Hm, I dug through my cookbook but didn't find it. I guess I just google it when I want. This recipe is pretty close, though being practical/lazy I simplify it somewhat.

              Ingredients:

              • butter (any sort)
              • onions ('cos I have them)
              • whatever cream is available
              • any Gorgonzola

              Method:
              Fry the onions in butter, add lots of cream and melt Gorgonzola into it + seasoning. Voilla.

              1 vote
              1. cfabbro
                Link Parent
                Nice, that's a lot simpler than I expected. I thought for sure a roux or bechamel might be involved, but it's clearly just another lovely little cheese emulsion like Alfredo. Thanks, I will have...

                Nice, that's a lot simpler than I expected. I thought for sure a roux or bechamel might be involved, but it's clearly just another lovely little cheese emulsion like Alfredo. Thanks, I will have to give that a try next time I make some gnocchi... which will be soon, since I am still craving it pretty bad! :P

                1 vote
  5. SleepyGary
    Link
    I recently did Bon Appetit's Best Lasagna recipe and while it was a tonne of work, it was also amazing. Bolognese Ingredients 1 kg ground pork 0.5 kg group beef (I used venison) 30 ml Olive oil 5...

    I recently did Bon Appetit's Best Lasagna recipe and while it was a tonne of work, it was also amazing.

    Bolognese

    Ingredients

    • 1 kg ground pork
    • 0.5 kg group beef (I used venison)
    • 30 ml Olive oil
    • 5 slice of pancetta or bacon
    • 1 onion finely chopped
    • 1 celery stalk finely chopped
    • 1 large carrot finely chopped
    • 20 grams minced garlic
    • 30 ml tomato paste
    • 175 ml White wine
    • 590 ml of whole peeled tomatoes
    • 235 ml of broth
    • 235 ml of whole milk

    Instructions

    Meat balls

    • Preheat oven to 105°C.
    • Mix pork and beef with your hands in a large bowl;
      • Season generously with salt and pepper, then mix again.
      • Form into about 18-ish large meatballs.
    • Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high.
    • Brown & Crisp meatballs on each side.
      • Don't crowd the DO, do in batches.
    • Set aside as they are done.

    Sauce

    • Reduce heat on dutch oven to medium.
    • Add pancetta and cook, stirring often until lightly browned and beginning to crisp
    • Add onion, celery, carrot, and garlic
    • Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened.
    • Add tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly, until paste darkens.
    • Add wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until nearly completely evaporated.
    • Add tomatoes, crushing with your hands, and increase heat to medium-high.
    • Cook, stirring occasionally, reduce by ~1/2.
    • Add broth and milk and return meat to pot.
    • Bring to a simmer.
    • Cover pot, leaving lid slightly ajar, and transfer to oven.
    • Bake sauce
      • No need to stir, but check after 1–2 hours to ensure liquid is at a low simmer, adjusting oven temperature as needed
    • Cook until meatballs are falling-apart tender, ~3–4 hours.
    • Using a potato masher, break meatballs apart and incorporate into liquid
    • Season with salt and pepper.
    • Reduce over medium-low heat if needed to thicken.
      • Optionally I took a cup of the Ragu and blended it until completely smooth and added it back into the sauce, it makes it really creamy.

    This sauce be made ahead can be stored in the fridge for a few days or in the freezer for up to 3 months. It's seriously amazing on for any pasta dish that calls for bolognese.


    Béchamel

    This is where the recipe kind of deviates from most lasagnas you'd normally make, instead of ricotta we're using a Béchamel sauce.

    Ingredients

    • 100 grams unsalted butter
    • 65 grams of flour
    • 1.4 litres milk
    • 115 grams grated parmesan cheese
    • Pinch of cayenne
    • Pinch of nutmeg

    Instructions

    • Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.
    • Whisk in flour and cook, whisking occasionally, until flour begins to smell a bit nutty.
    • Quickly whisk in milk
    • Increase heat to medium-high.
    • Bring to a simmer and cook, whisking occasionally, until béchamel thickens.
    • Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, whisking occasionally, until smooth.
    • Remove from heat
    • Whisk in Parmesan, cayenne, and nutmeg
    • Season with salt and pepper.
    • Transfer to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap.

    Use within one hour or chill overnight (then re-heat to loosen)


    Lasagna

    Assembly

    • Preheat oven to 175°C
    • If using dried noodles pre-cook by boiling to very al dente
    • Ragu -> Noodle -> Béchamel
    • Repeat as many times as necessary to fill your cooking dish.
    • (BA's recipe ends it there but I topped with fresh mozza to get some string cheesiness.)
    • Cover with lightly oiled foil
    • Bake for 1 hour
    • Uncover and bake until top is browned and edges are crispy
    • Remove and rest for at 10 minutes

    You can also freeze and store the unbaked lasagna for a month, I did this, also skipping boiling the noodles, and it work out great great by portioning them in 3-4 serving sized dishes. Let thaw overnight and bake as per instructions above.

    2 votes