21 votes

Understanding the AeroPress (Episode #1)

18 comments

  1. [4]
    bilbodwyer
    Link
    I quite enjoy James Hoffman's YouTube channel, his softly-spoken delivery delivery feels very cosy and almost intimate. It's very satisfying. Also satisfying is the deep knowledge of coffee and...

    I quite enjoy James Hoffman's YouTube channel, his softly-spoken delivery delivery feels very cosy and almost intimate. It's very satisfying.
    Also satisfying is the deep knowledge of coffee and brewing that the man has, and this is the first part in a series about the AeroPress, my preferred method of making coffee at the moment. Part 2 is also up now, though I've yet to watch.

    9 votes
    1. mat
      Link Parent
      I hate coffee but I love (and regularly watch) Weird Coffee Guy's channel in part because he is very relaxing but also because he's a passionate and knowledgable person talking about the thing...

      I hate coffee but I love (and regularly watch) Weird Coffee Guy's channel in part because he is very relaxing but also because he's a passionate and knowledgable person talking about the thing he's passionate and knowledgeable about and that never gets old. It's the same reason I'm currently watching a channel about plastering.

      1 vote
    2. [2]
      bhrgunatha
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I absolutely love my Aeropress and the associated ritual. So cheap for such a versatile maker of really good coffee that gives you control of most of the important variables. I think there's even...

      I absolutely love my Aeropress and the associated ritual.

      So cheap for such a versatile maker of really good coffee that gives you control of most of the important variables. I think there's even an accessory to generate extra pressure.*

      For some reason I thought he disliked the Aeropress and was always joking about upcoming reviews.

      Inverted method forever!

      Edit: The comments on that first video are so good. My favourite:

      This feels a bit like waiting for Joe Cornish to finally complete his doodle story on the Adam Buxton Christmas podcast!

      * - Found it! It's the Fellow Prismo. Despite the marketing I wouldn;t call it espresso.

      1 vote
      1. ChuckS
        Link Parent
        You gotta watch part two! Use LESS pressure!

        I think there's even an accessory to generate extra pressure.

        You gotta watch part two! Use LESS pressure!

        3 votes
  2. MonkeyPants
    Link
    That was unexpectedly interesting. Thank you.

    That was unexpectedly interesting. Thank you.

    2 votes
  3. tomf
    Link
    Hoffmann's second video was great, but I still prefer the inverted method. For me, I do 16g salt-grain-like grind w/ 256g water at ~95C / 203F, four minutes, ss mesh filter. I do Alan's 'gently...

    Hoffmann's second video was great, but I still prefer the inverted method. For me, I do 16g salt-grain-like grind w/ 256g water at ~95C / 203F, four minutes, ss mesh filter. I do Alan's 'gently lean on it' press technique, which is roughly 6lbs of pressure.

    Inverted, 256g of water puts it at the absolute top of the press. For the flip, I put a heated mug on top and flip it all in one go -- and I've never had a spill.

    I love the Aeropress. Its my go-to. Hoffmann's no-press french press method is also really nice for a full bodied cup.

    2 votes
  4. [12]
    streblo
    Link
    I used to love my Aeropress. Then I bought an espresso machine and haven't looked back.

    I used to love my Aeropress. Then I bought an espresso machine and haven't looked back.

    1 vote
    1. [7]
      j3n
      Link Parent
      Likewise. I think I own (or at least have owned at some point) just about every coffee brewing apparatus known to man. If I want espresso, there's no substitute for a decent espresso maker. If I...

      Likewise. I think I own (or at least have owned at some point) just about every coffee brewing apparatus known to man. If I want espresso, there's no substitute for a decent espresso maker. If I want brewed coffee, french press is the undisputed king in my book. For me, there is no in between. Products like aeropress and Moka pots fill a niche that I don't ever find myself craving.

      3 votes
      1. [5]
        bilbodwyer
        Link Parent
        I struggle to get excellent coffee out of my French press. It's often overextracted and the end of the cup is sludgy and gross. Not to say that I've not had good French press coffees, but perhaps...

        If I want brewed coffee, french press is the undisputed king in my book.

        I struggle to get excellent coffee out of my French press. It's often overextracted and the end of the cup is sludgy and gross. Not to say that I've not had good French press coffees, but perhaps my apparatus or method leave a bit to be desired. What's your recipe?

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          cfabbro
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          Weird, I have never had a sludgy end of cup using my French Press. Could your grind be a bit too fine (or have too much fine grit in it)? If so, that would likely explain why you're getting that,...

          Weird, I have never had a sludgy end of cup using my French Press. Could your grind be a bit too fine (or have too much fine grit in it)? If so, that would likely explain why you're getting that, and also the over-extraction too, since you should ideally only use courser, fresh grinds in a French Press.

          The amount of time you let it steep is also a big factor in the extraction too. I enjoy a decently strong cup of coffee, so typically let it steep for about 3-4 minutes before I finally plunge. Longer if I feel like an even stronger cup that day.

          Speaking of which, your plunging technique might also be the culprit as well, since by pushing too hard/fast/unevenly it can cause sediment in the bottom of the press to get stirred up and find its way past the filter. Slow, steady, even pressure is the key to a good plunge.

          Same goes with pouring. Pour too fast and you will likely stir up a bunch of the sediment. And I also usually sacrifice a bit of the coffee too, leaving a few cm left in the bottom of the press in order to avoid any sediment making its way into my cup.

          4 votes
          1. [2]
            bilbodwyer
            Link Parent
            I have my grinder locked on quite a course setting, so I'm hoping it's not the grind (took me ages to find the sweet spot for the grind to bring out the flavour profile of my beans). I think I'm...

            I have my grinder locked on quite a course setting, so I'm hoping it's not the grind (took me ages to find the sweet spot for the grind to bring out the flavour profile of my beans). I think I'm definitely overdoing it with the brew time, so I'll experiment with reducing the steep before the plunge. I've experimented with not plunging at all, and instead just use the plunger as a filter: that sometimes reduces my sludgy outcome.
            Now that I think on it, perhaps there's something to do with my water that isn't helping... I shall try filtered water when I can!

            2 votes
            1. cfabbro
              Link Parent
              I think I was editing my comment when you replied (bad habit of mine, sorry). I also added a section on plunging and pouring technique too, which may help you out as well. :)

              I think I was editing my comment when you replied (bad habit of mine, sorry). I also added a section on plunging and pouring technique too, which may help you out as well. :)

        2. MonkeyPants
          Link Parent
          I've noticed it's the last half cup that has the sludge: Course Grind. Add an half a cup of boiling water beyond what you need. Stir vigorously. Steep for 1-2 minutes. Press slowly. Let it sit for...

          I've noticed it's the last half cup that has the sludge:

          Course Grind.

          Add an half a cup of boiling water beyond what you need.

          Stir vigorously.

          Steep for 1-2 minutes.

          Press slowly.

          Let it sit for half a minute while you fill your cup with milk or whatever.

          Pour, leaving the half a cup of sacrificial coffee with the sludge in the french press.

          2 votes
      2. Thra11
        Link Parent
        I used an aeropress for a while, but using the inverted method and a metal filter. It made a perfectly good cup of coffee, but it wasn't doing anything a french press doesn't do, except leaking a...

        I used an aeropress for a while, but using the inverted method and a metal filter. It made a perfectly good cup of coffee, but it wasn't doing anything a french press doesn't do, except leaking a bit at the edges. Despite always cleaning it immediately after use, the rubber on the plunger started to perish too. I switched to a french press and have been happy with that.

        The only bit I miss is the ability to cleanly eject the puck of used grounds into the compost.

        2 votes
    2. Wulfsta
      Link Parent
      I can’t justify getting into espresso - the shop down the street from me makes better espresso than I can reasonably replicate at home without an extreme amount of work. I have to be content that...

      I can’t justify getting into espresso - the shop down the street from me makes better espresso than I can reasonably replicate at home without an extreme amount of work. I have to be content that I can make a better Chemex.

      3 votes
    3. [2]
      grahamiam
      Link Parent
      For me, Aeropress was a good bit more work for only a slightly better cup than a Moka pot. But 95% of the coffee I drink now is coldbrew so it's a mostly moot point.

      For me, Aeropress was a good bit more work for only a slightly better cup than a Moka pot. But 95% of the coffee I drink now is coldbrew so it's a mostly moot point.

      3 votes
      1. wervenyt
        Link Parent
        As a huge fan of both aeropress and moka pots, they're about as close as two coffee brew methods can be.

        As a huge fan of both aeropress and moka pots, they're about as close as two coffee brew methods can be.

        1 vote
    4. wervenyt
      Link Parent
      The aeropress is much more of an easy pourover than an espresso-lite, no matter what the inventor claims.

      The aeropress is much more of an easy pourover than an espresso-lite, no matter what the inventor claims.

      1 vote