• Most votes
  • Most comments
  • Newest
  • Activity
  • Showing only topics with the tag "privacy". Back to normal view
    1. Please, if you haven’t already, see Part I and Part II. Besides using anti-virus software, I wondered if there were other ways in which I could reduce the amount of threats to my online privacy...

      Please, if you haven’t already, see Part I and Part II.

      Besides using anti-virus software, I wondered if there were other ways in which I could reduce the amount of threats to my online privacy and security. One method that I came across was to block adware and malware before it had the chance to reach my browser and computer.

      For the technically inclined person there is Pi-Hole which is a network-wide adware/malware blocker. The name comes from the use of a Raspberry Pi to act as a black hole for adware/malware. Currently, supported operating systems include Raspbian, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and CentOS.

      A much easier method, which essentially does the same thing, is to modify your computer’s hosts file. For a safe and easy way to do this, I recommend that you use free GUI software to implement this. Windows users can download Hosts File Editor+ and Mac users can download Gas Mask.

      Next, you will want a DNS blacklist that comes from trusted sources. The ones that I recommend are from Steven Black here: https://github.com/StevenBlack/hosts

      Scroll down the page a little until you come to a table of all the different combinations of blacklists.

      From there you would choose which list to use, as your new hosts file depending on your personal preferences by clicking on the corresponding Non Github mirror.

      Using your hosts file editing software, you would then create a new hosts file by copying and pasting your preferred list. You may want to check for an updated list every once in a while. Most of these lists have their associated creation dates near the top for convenience.

      24 votes
    2. You may have missed part I which is, specifically, meant for those living in the United States. Most of us are aware of targeted advertisements in which companies (Facebook, Google, Amazon, and...

      You may have missed part I which is, specifically, meant for those living in the United States.

      Most of us are aware of targeted advertisements in which companies (Facebook, Google, Amazon, and countless others) use web cookies and other tracking mechanisms to collect information from your computer, network, and browsing activities in order to display relevant ads to you. In fact, there are hundreds of companies collecting, selling, and reselling your data. This data is stored in, potentially, thousands of databases throughout the world. Most of these companies are acting in ‘good faith’ and may not be involved in any illegal activities. Even so, there are many people who think this is creepy or borders on the edge of unethical practice. Read more.

      What happens when these databases are breached by hackers and end up on the dark web?

      Imagine that information in the hands of a boss who wants to lower your wages, a political opponent, a business competitor, a disgruntled neighbor, or a criminal.

      There are a growing number of people who are abandoning sites such as Facebook and Google because they are deeply concerned about their privacy. Journalist Kashmir Hill wrote an entertaining multi-part series, Goodbye Big Five, in which she chronicled her efforts to discontinue using Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Apple.

      16 votes
    3. After reading about and implementing simple privacy/security measures I thought it would be a good idea to share some of these things with others. Please, keep in mind that this is only meant as...

      After reading about and implementing simple privacy/security measures I thought it would be a good idea to share some of these things with others. Please, keep in mind that this is only meant as an introduction to the subject. Almost everything that will be covered can be carried out with no monetary cost.

      Part I is meant to serve those who reside in the United States.

      To put things in perspective, a 2016 study reported “total losses across all incidents of identity theft totaled $17.5 billion”. Furthermore, “More than a third (36%) of victims who spent 6 months or more resolving financial and credit problems as a result of the identity theft experienced severe emotional distress”.

      1. Place a freeze on your credit reports. Read more
      1. Stop unsolicited mail, phone calls, and email.
      2. Set up enhanced security features with my Social Security account.
      18 votes