• Activity
  • Votes
  • Comments
  • New
  • All activity
  • Showing only topics with the tag "recommendation". Back to normal view
    1. The Banshees of Inisherin

      I saw The Banshees of Inisherin in theaters yesterday and greatly enjoyed myself. I recommend it highly! Starring Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson (among others), the film takes place in a...

      I saw The Banshees of Inisherin in theaters yesterday and greatly enjoyed myself. I recommend it highly! Starring Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson (among others), the film takes place in a remote, pastoral part of Ireland with the Irish Civil War as a backdrop. But it's really about the people living on this island; their relationships, their lifestyle, and their internal conflicts. It's character-driven, personal, intimate, funny, surreal, shocking, troubling, and thought-provoking. The dialogue is fantastic and the narrative dramatic. You could do a lot of interesting thematic analysis about the plot and setting, but I don't want to spoil anything.

      If you're the kind of person who likes movie trailers, you can watch the official one on YouTube. However, I think contemporary trailers take away from the natural revelations of a story. It's more interesting to go into this one more or less blind.

      5 votes
    2. Movie recommendation: Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes

      Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes Runtime: 70 minutes. Budget: $27,000 USD. Tomatometer: 98% - 8.3 / 10 IMDB Rating: 7.3 / 10 - 2k ratings Language: Japanese with English subtitles Streaming: Vudu...

      Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes

      Runtime: 70 minutes.

      Budget: $27,000 USD.

      Tomatometer: 98% - 8.3 / 10

      IMDB Rating: 7.3 / 10 - 2k ratings

      Language: Japanese with English subtitles

      Streaming: Vudu (Free with Adds) & Amazon (free with Prime)

      This is an engaging & novel sci fi, filmed in one location, a Japanese cafe, using what appears to be a single shot for all 70 minutes.

      It has comedy, romance, violence, action, and an utterly novel sci fi concept. All in 70 minutes.

      14 votes
    3. Everything Everywhere All at Once

      It has been two days since I have seen this movie and yet I still have not come to the point where I can talk about it in a way that makes any sense. The only way I have been able to describe the...

      It has been two days since I have seen this movie and yet I still have not come to the point where I can talk about it in a way that makes any sense.

      The only way I have been able to describe the movie so far is that it’s a roughly two hour long action comedy drama. The name really fits because it is about everything. Success, failure, choice, the nature of meaning, what we owe to each other, why we are here, who we are, and what makes life worth living. It’s also a generational drama, a wuxia film, and a shameless knockoff of ratatouille.

      It’s also a movie that I am afraid of spoiling the plot for you in spite of the fact that I am fairly sure that the film is unique enough that you couldn’t possibly “get it” no matter how much I talk about it.

      It’s also the first movie in such a long time where the ideas didn’t fly over peoples heads and so much of the audience was stuck after the credits just trying to recover from the experience while wiping the tears from their eyes.

      This film is so far out in front of all other choices that I think it’s pretty safe to say it’s going to be my pick for best film of this decade. And you should try to watch it in theaters while you can.

      25 votes
    4. I just want to take a minute to talk about Jojo Rabbit

      Warning: this post may contain spoilers

      Two nights ago I decided on a whim to watch Jojo Rabbit on Disney+, since I love Taiki Waititi, and I remember hearing good things about it when it was first released a few years ago. But, weirdly, I didn't actually know much about it other than him having directed it.

      So imagine my shock, horror, and surprise when I finally started watching it and learned it was a comedy-drama about a Hitler youth!!! I thought it was just about boy scouts or something, similar to Moonrise Kingdom. And I was even more surprised when I almost immediately got over my shock and started enjoying it despite how dark and touchy the subject matter was. It had just the right amount of irreverence for the subject to get me past my initial hesitance, and had enough deeply human, incredibly touching, and painfully poignant moments to get me completely engrossed in it. And by the end I was crying like a baby when he noticed the shoes, and again in the final scenes. (keeping it vague in case others haven't seen it yet)

      Several days later and I'm still thinking about it. That's how deeply it affected me. So, needless to say, I highly highly highly recommend watching it, if you haven't seen it yet... especially in light of recent events in Russia and Ukraine, which a lot of the things shown in the movie sadly remind me of.

      Has anyone else here seen it? If so, what did you think about it?

      p.s. Taika Waititi as Hitler was insanely, darkly hilarious, and the final scene with him was incredibly satisfying. "Fuck off, Hitler!"

      15 votes
    5. You should see Belle

      It's fairly rare to get the opportunity to get to watch a Japanese animated movie in theaters in the US, and earlier today I watched Belle in IMAX. It's honestly really hard to talk about the film...

      It's fairly rare to get the opportunity to get to watch a Japanese animated movie in theaters in the US, and earlier today I watched Belle in IMAX.

      It's honestly really hard to talk about the film in it's entirety. It's a really deeply layered film, and even with how extensive the previews for this film have been they don't really do a very good job of describing what the film is about. Even after saying that I don't really want to explain it because I think that it's best to just jump in and enjoy it - and frankly I'm not sure I could explain it very well without spoiling it. That being said, because it's so layered and there's so much content it talks about it can be hard to grasp the deeper meanings. I saw this movie with my husband and I can tell you that he definitely didn't get it. After reading a handful of reviews it looks like a number of critics didn't get it either. The good news is that you don't have to be a film major to enjoy it; it's still going to be plenty enjoyable even if you miss those meanings. It helps that the production on this film is utterly fantastic, and the sound design and music are particularly fantastic.

      From an academic perspective this film literally pulls off every trick in the animation and filmmaking books. It uses traditional style 2D animation, it's got 3D animation, some scenes use a mixture of the two. It has computer-generated tweening at times, and in other times the 2D drawings are morphed to animate them and create the illusion of life. The director Mamoru Hosoda has a pretty long track record at this point and this film has aspects that show off his signature aesthetics and unique techniques that he has developed over the years. And he does so to a great effect; I found myself being strongly emotionally affected by several of it's scenes. Of those highly affecting scenes, not all of them evoked tears; there were also plenty of times where I found myself almost laughing because the scenes were full of positivity.

      While it's tempting to consider this a retelling of Beauty and Beast from the previews, the film is so much more than that. Even the most basic understanding you could take from this film would not support that position. In fact the "beast" of this story is not even a romantic interest.

      The thing that endears me personally to this movie so much is that there are two dramatic scenes that are handled so realistically and naturally it felt like I was reliving portions of my own life. There is a scene early on where the main character tries to sing quietly to herself when she's all by her lonesome but is so overcome with emotions that she not only can't hold a single note, the act makes her throw up. And in the last act there is a scene where a boy is suffering from emotional abuse from his father and is completely unable to trust people who are trying to help him. He's been too hurt by people who promised to help but eventually left him in the same situation, allowing more abuse to happen.

      There are many reasons that I would recommend watching this movie, but I wanted to recommend this movie to this community in particular because I think that some of the messages this movie was made to tell will resonate with the people here. The film is a struggle to answer the question "why should we help other people?" The film also has a lot to say about how we treat each other over the internet, as you may have already surmised.

      10 votes
    6. Val (2021)

      I watched Val tonight. Its mostly old footage that Val filmed himself. He was quick to have a video camera and seemed to carry it with him everywhere. If you're unaware, Val Kilmer lost his voice...

      I watched Val tonight. Its mostly old footage that Val filmed himself. He was quick to have a video camera and seemed to carry it with him everywhere.

      If you're unaware, Val Kilmer lost his voice during his treatment for throat cancer. He can still speak, but with difficulty.

      Anyway, even if you're a mild fan of Kilmer's work, this is worth a watch. I much prefer this format for documentaries to the talking heads we get with other documentaries like Velvet Underground (2021)

      Val is from Amazon Studios and A24.

      6 votes
    7. The Lighthouse (2019) was made by nerds, and it's awesome

      Arriving to the party only fashionably late, I just found out that 2019's The Lighthouse existed & I watched it with friends last night. I loved it so much. It's just so good. It's an art film...

      Arriving to the party only fashionably late, I just found out that 2019's The Lighthouse existed & I watched it with friends last night.

      I loved it so much. It's just so good. It's an art film made by nerds, and I think it might be for nerds as well. Robert Pattinson, and Willem Dafoe, absolutely killed it in their roles. Really intense stuff. I believed I was watching two men go insane—just losing every last marble in their heads. The cinematography was top notch, and the confined aspect ratio really worked towards a feeling of claustrophobia without being distracting. I didn't notice the sound design in the moment, which probably means it was excellent. Or at least, not distracting. I'll need to give it another watch. The whole movie was... a lot. And I know there's a ton I didn't catch the first time around. So much symbolism, callbacks to folklore, classical mythology, and art. Detail in every frame. Comedy made both hilarious and uncomfortable by its context. I'm gonna go ahead and call it genius, and art that deserves to be called art.

      It just felt so much that it was a work of passion, from those who all cared deeply about the craft of art, fiction, theater, and film, and so they poured all their effort into everything as respect towards the craft.

      Spoilers:

      There's so much I haven't decided about the film yet. Top of my list though, were Thomas & Thomas the same man? Often throughout the beginning of the film I was under the distinct impression that two men were physically present. But later, it felt that maybe Old Thomas was a hallucination. Perhaps Young Thomas' subconscious. That whole bit with Young Thomas ranting about how much he hates how Old Thomas smelled gave me a real self-hatred kind of vibe. And it would explain how Old Thomas would speak to Young Thomas, how he always knew what Young was doing, and that the gaslighting by Old Thomas could have been that little voice in the back of your mind when coping with trauma, or a difficult situation. Although, Old Thomas could have just been a crazy old man that never allowed Young Thomas to feel alone. That one scene was obviously a reference to Sascha Schneider's Hypnosis, and I got the sense that Old Thomas was meant to be understood as the lighthouse itself. I haven't decided what I think the filmmakers was going for there yet, but it was clearly something. For now I think that both Old & Young Thomas physically existed, but as Young Thomas loses his mind, he's projecting his subconscious onto Old Thomas. Both the men are very unreliable narrators, and that's not at all helped by their insanity or by drinking turpentine & kerosene.

      How much of the folklore was real? Are the seagulls actually the souls of dead sailors? Does killing one actually bring bad luck? The storm that stranded our two Thomas's didn't happen until after it was killed. Causality, or coincidence? That one seagull had only one eye, just as the (hallucinated? real?) head in the lobster trap had only one eye. Was that the head of a previous wickie, that Old Thomas was using as lobster bait? Fucked up, and too close to cannibalism for comfort. Or was Young Thomas hallucinating that head out of his guilt and belief that one-eyed seagull might have been a past sailor? The final frames are Young Thomas getting his insides eaten by gulls. Big Prometheus thing going on, but is Young Thomas being punished by those souls, or are they just seagulls being opportunistic?
      Was that mermaid real? Was it a madman's vision of a manatee? I have it in my brain that sailors did fuck manatees, but that might not be true. Was the mermaid Old Thomas? Young Thomas was struggling with repressed sexuality that whole movie. Him snapping, then breaking Old Thomas to be a dog was super kinky shit. Ton of sexual imagery in that whole sequence. Rapey too, not consensual at all. They had some intimate moments while drunk before this. Convenient sexual outlet relationships are a thing that happens. That could work with that smell rant, coming from guilt and shame Young Thomas is feeling for projecting sexual thoughts onto an old, filthy sailor. If Old Thomas was the mermaid, then that's Young Thomas choosing to see the world different as it is as a coping mechanism. There was for sure a focus on phallic imagery, homoeroticism, and masculinity. But I'd say it was less of a closeted, self-hating gay thing, and more of a sexual frustration & guilt from it, kind of thing.

      What the fuck was going on with the light? Old Thomas claimed it as his, not to share with anyone else. He had been insane from the beginning. Having that odd, possessive relationship with the light. Staring right into it and masturbating. Jesus. Does he cope with how shitty being a wickie is, by claiming it as a constant in his life and taking ownership of it? Young Thomas wants to see it because it's not his, he hasn't been allowed to see it. Prometheus stealing fire from the Gods. Was that light more than just an old mans coping mechanism, and more than just something a young man isn't allowed to have? That imagery with Hypnosis, and Old Thomas representing the lighthouse.. alright the light is hypnotic, and Old Thomas is willingly staring right into it on purpose cuz being a wickie blows, and he just wants to feel numb?

      How long were they stranded? The dialogue lampshades that they have no idea, but Old Thomas was gaslighting along the way. Paraphrasing, 'I've been telling you to ration for weeks now' while he had only just discoverd their food had spoiled. Or, is that the filmmakers playing with the loss of a sense of time passing, madness, and unreliable narrators? They've got mad from isolation, tedium, alcoholism, and drinking fucking kerosene. 99% of this movie you can't trust that anything is true. The opening scene, and the ending scene are the only I noticed where the camera isn't showing us one of the Thomas's perspectives. I can't trust either Thomas, but I'll trust a camera not from their PoV. Which, makes that closing scene right confusion. Immediately prior, we have Young Thomas falling down the lighthouse. Next we see him stark naked, outside, being eaten alive by birds. If he did fall, how did he get outside? All his bones ought to be busted. What happened to his clothes? A friend suggested that Young Thomas was a shipwrecked sailor, and hallucinated the whole movie. But this movie felt far too smart to pull an "it was all a dream". Maybe it was just an imagery thing, showing the fate of Prometheus. I don't know, man.

      This movie was so fucking good. I'm gonna watch it again. I'm gonna go hunt down interviews, and see what analysis has already been done on it. There's so much I haven't even touched on.

      It makes me want to read about lighthouse keepers. How many of them went nuts? Makes me wonder how much of sea-folklore was the product of men just losing it; I always just assumed they were mostly just sailors fucking with people. The film had the Thomas's only scheduled to be there a month, but Young was going crazy before that time was up. The job surely must have sucked. But now I want to know, and two days ago I didn't give half a shit. Great stuff. I've got some Navy buddies, and I hear being on a ship blows. And that's with more people, and more structure. I've lived in a deployed, non-oceanic environment, and you certainly lose a bit of your mind. Though, it's always come back for me. To think of two men, who hate each-other, being stranded in such a bullshit environment for possibly months while getting blasted on actual poison, well I don't blame either of them for losing their whole humanity.

      Five stars.


      Side note: I didn't super-want to make this its own post. But I want to talk about it, and we haven't done a recurring "what have you watched" thread in a while. So here's my initial thoughts.

      Post comments so I can talk about this with y'all >:0

      16 votes
    8. I want to talk about Bill and Ted Face the Music

      I watched it tonight and it is so much better than it has any right to be. I think they really captured what made the originals good: the humor between Bill and Ted, the way that they genuinely...

      I watched it tonight and it is so much better than it has any right to be. I think they really captured what made the originals good: the humor between Bill and Ted, the way that they genuinely care about each other and the other people they pick up along the way, and the bit of over-the-top-ness in what they play and how they play that appealed to me as a 16-year-old metalhead when I first watched them.

      Spoiler
      The scene where Hendrix impresses Mozart enough to come outside and see what he's playing/how he knows the song was the essence of the entire series in a single scene in my opinion. Mozart comes out and doesn't say "who the hell are these people?" (at least I don't think so, I don't understand enough German to really say), he is just in awe and is happy to share that moment and that music with Hendrix. The way people come together to do things just warms my heart in a way that's really needed this year.
      28 votes
    9. If you don't find IMDB reviews useful you may like Cherry Picks instead

      Here's the IMDB page for The Souvenir (distributed by A24). https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6920356/ IMDB users give the score as 6.6, and the user reviews are stuffed full of people who hate it. The...

      Here's the IMDB page for The Souvenir (distributed by A24). https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6920356/

      IMDB users give the score as 6.6, and the user reviews are stuffed full of people who hate it. The critic reviews are almost entirely positive though.

      Here's the Cherry Picks page for The Souvenir. https://www.thecherrypicks.com/films/souvenir

      They use reviews from "female-identifying and non-binary film critics", and as a result the film gets good reviews.

      I find the reviews surfaced by Cherry Picks to be more thoughtful, more considered, and more useful to me than those surfaced by IMDB or MetaCritic (even though they all pull critic reviews from many of the same sources).

      I've found some great films via Cherry Picks.

      15 votes
    10. Apollo 11 is phenomenal, and gave me an existential crisis

      Apollo 11 is a limited IMAX only engagement, at least for now, and I don't know how long it'll be in theaters. But while it is, I implore everyone to go see it.This movie left me speechless, and...

      Apollo 11 is a limited IMAX only engagement, at least for now, and I don't know how long it'll be in theaters. But while it is, I implore everyone to go see it.This movie left me speechless, and not just in the sense of the footage being so incredible as to leave me without words, though that's certainly a factor. It's restored footage and audio of the Apollo 11 mission, for anyone that doesn't know, and it covers the launch, moon landing, and re-entry.

      It's so easy for historical events to be looked back on and be seen as just that: events. Like a natural disaster or the existence of a waterfall or a canyon, so many battles, inventions, and human triumphs are stripped of humanity, remembered only as things that happened, not things people did. Apollo 11 has staggering to witness footage, yes, but it weaves that footage together with the human moments wonderfully. The scenes of the launch countdown or the lander making its descent are intercut and splitscreened with the footage of the NASA control centers, with names of all the teams, as audio of their conversations with the astronauts and recaps of what has happened and is going to play over the incredibly restored launch footage. Cuts to the crowd overlooking the Apollo 11 launch are also common in the beginning.

      This is not an educational video, one to be seen for great understanding of the finer details of the mission. Apollo 11 instead acts as history in motion, with a perspective to the individuals and the event simultaneously. It's about the people that accomplished the amazing things you see. A display of the triumph of human spirit over the perceived rules of the world and the desire for understanding out world and breaking the limits that we thought were imposed on us. And yet, we as the viewers have a perspective that the people who actually accomplished the great things we see never did. The splitscreening helps to assign human beings to the awe inspiring footage in front of the viewer, yes, but at the same time it offers 2 entirely separated perspectives framed as one, one that the human beings being assigned to the footage never truly experienced in the moment. We have an intimate view of the control center with a simultaneous omnipotent-esque view of the mission in all of its glory. The viewer as the omnipotent being is true of most films to some degree, but the way in which the movie frames its central event, small and big at the same time, really highlights an omnipresent view that even those who lived through the launch never experienced in real time. It's a film of contrast between the individuals and the accomplishment of the collective, but in its control center voiceovers and constant splitscreens, it's really a movie that bridges the two contrasts.

      Basically, I loved it in ways that, despite my extensive best efforts, I find difficult to describe. This line sounds corny, I know, but you owe it to yourself to see it on the biggest screen that you can, and I implore everyone to try to make time for it and find a true IMAX showing, if possible. The visuals alone may not have been the biggest thing that awed me, but they were certainly a huge part of it. And for anyone that's also seen it, what'd you think? I'd love to see other perspectives on this doc.

      11 votes
    11. The Lobster (2014) - An absurdist, dystopian love story

      I watched this conversation between Colin Farrell and Hugh Grant today, and learned of Farrell’s film The Lobster, which features him and Rachel Weisz. I really enjoyed it, it is an absurdist,...

      I watched this conversation between Colin Farrell and Hugh Grant today, and learned of Farrell’s film The Lobster, which features him and Rachel Weisz. I really enjoyed it, it is an absurdist, distopian, and surreal love story which tickled all of my favorite sensibilities. I highly recommend it.

      Has anyone else seen this? Did you enjoy it? Do you have any other modern films to recommend along the same lines?

      IMDB

      Edit: it’s also a comedy, at least for two of us.

      11 votes
    12. Sunshine - 2007 - Sci-fi thriller

      Today NASA launched the Parker Solar Probe which will dive closer to the sun than any other man made object in history. In celebration of this event I watched Sunshine, a really well cast sci fi...

      Today NASA launched the Parker Solar Probe which will dive closer to the sun than any other man made object in history.

      In celebration of this event I watched Sunshine, a really well cast sci fi thriller. It was pretty darn good. I would highly recommend a watch if you are into this sort of thing, I had entirely missed it somehow. Casting is great, visuals are great, story is good, pacing is excellent. Don't be put off by the age of the movie, I don't think vfx would be any better today.

      50 years into the future, the Sun begins to die, and Earth is dying as a result. A team of astronauts is sent to revive the Sun - but the mission fails. Seven years later, a new team is sent to finish the mission as mankind's last hope.

      It may not be on US Netflix but it is on Amazon.

      Trailer

      15 votes
    13. I saw Sorry to Bother You this week and I thought it was amazing, what did you think?

      I loved how surreal this movie was. It reminded me a lot of some of my favorite movies like Brazil, with these characters that live in an absurd world getting caught up in something crazy. I liked...

      I loved how surreal this movie was. It reminded me a lot of some of my favorite movies like Brazil, with these characters that live in an absurd world getting caught up in something crazy.

      I liked all the repeated gags related to the earrings and the photo.

      The themes on anti-capitalism, issues of fame, selling out, were all captured really well.

      And the sound track was awesome.

      What did you all think?

      5 votes
    14. Six quality films from the directors of this year's Cannes Film Festival

      Quick intro: My personal problem with Reddit's movie sub is with its narrow perspective on films. I know it might sound elitist, but I just found most of the discussions to be circlejerks or full...

      Quick intro: My personal problem with Reddit's movie sub is with its narrow perspective on films. I know it might sound elitist, but I just found most of the discussions to be circlejerks or full of references/memes done to death. The anti-theater Netflix-can-do-no-wrong attitude is confusing at best (considering the overwhelming love for Nolan/PTA/Taratino who are championing the analog film experience). /r/truefilm is full of insightful writing but it's not exactly a welcoming place for newbie cinephiles who got into films via MCU, Star Wars, or other blockbuster franchises. Don't get me wrong, I visit both subs everyday, but I kind of wish there's a balance: A place where you can have both casual discussions about high-brow cinema AND in-depth essays about comedy with dick jokes.

      Hence why I am writing this while ~movies is still fresh (hopefully I am adding something of value and not come off too rambly). Now of course I could just start a post asking for foreign film recommendations, but I just don't find those post to go anywhere, they usually just end up with people listing out films without any thought or explanation. Cinema is about your personal experience in relations to what you see on screen, and I think we are doing ourselves a disservice if we watch something and just shrug it off as "it's great you should watch it" or "it sucks". So putting money where my mouth is, here are some recommendations for non-english films. Sorry for the long set-up, but I hope this encourages a dialogue, even if you disagree with the above or my recommendations.

      ANYWAY. I settled on 6 because I didn't want it to a Top-5 list and 4 seems too short. 6 just feels right. Cannes just ended and I feel like it's a good time to start talking about the directors of this year's festival as their newest films will be available in the near future. So in no particular order, here are six quality films from the directors of this year's Cannes:

      1. "Mountains May Depart" (2015) - Jia Zhangke
        An ambitious piece of work that spans 25 years with an intro that goes for about an hour before the title card. Even if you don't like the film, the confidence of Jia Zhangke is in full display here.
      2. "Secret Sunshine" (2007) - Lee Chang-dong
        If Lars Von Trier films aren't realistic enough for you, here's a good one to kickstart your misery. After I finished watching it for the first time, I had to go for a walk and ended up wandering the city for 3 hours. It affected me in such a meaningful way. Surprising funny, if you can see the irony in it.
      3. "Ida" (2013) - Pawel Pawlikowski
        The cinematography! The framing in this movie is incredible, as if Ida is having a silent ever-going conversation with God. Not to mention the beautiful black and white!
      4. "A Separation" (2011) - Asghar Farhadi
        It was my first Farhadi film, and I quickly went on a hunt for all other Farhadi films right after. The writing grips you and really puts you in the place of all the characters. I could recommendation any other of his films, but to me, A Separation is perfect writing and a must-watch for any screenwriters.
      5. "Nobody Knows" (2004) - Hirokazu Kore-eda
        Heartbreaking. You know how the characters will end up (spoiler: not a good place) but you can't look away. I'm glad Kore-eda won Palme d'Or. Can't wait for his new one!
      6. "Vivre sa vie" (1962) - Jean-Luc Godard
        The only film pre-2000 on my list, but it's a film that feels quite modern. I've always felt that "Vivre sa vie" should be everyone's first Godard film instead of, say, "Breathless". It's the most coherent and it's a easy watch. It's a good starter movie before you take a deep dive into Godard's filmography (his work ranges from groundbreaking to borderline unwatchable IMO).

      Agree? Disagree? Sorry if I sound too much like Cinefix, haha. What do you think? Which other Cannes directors should I check out?
      7 votes