RoyalHenOil's recent activity

  1. Comment on YouTube seems to once again be rolling out its widely hated new web redesign in ~tech

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    Everything you are describing here was created primarily by Millennials for Millennials. Generation Z were all just little kids when Apple's App Store was launched, and Millennials always were and...

    Everything you are describing here was created primarily by Millennials for Millennials. Generation Z were all just little kids when Apple's App Store was launched, and Millennials always were and still continue to be YouTube's biggest audience. I don't have any recent demographic data for Wikipedia, but in 2011, the average reader was 36 years old and I would be very surprised if it has skewed dramatically younger since then.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Generic preventitive healthcare advice wanted in ~health

    RoyalHenOil
    Link
    You might see if they will let you have a good look at your heart and arteries. My mom had a CT scan done after someone ran a ran light and seriously injured her. They found substantial build-up...

    You might see if they will let you have a good look at your heart and arteries.

    My mom had a CT scan done after someone ran a ran light and seriously injured her. They found substantial build-up in her arteries that had been going on for years, despite the fact that she is a vegan and a very clean eater. They were lucky to catch it before she developed any heart problems.

    There is a genetic component to cholesterol issues, and it can start very young. People usually only get checked when they start having symptoms, by which point the heart is already taking damage.

    In other words, being injured in a wreck may have saved my mom's life.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on Mini split confusion (efficiency and sizing) in ~life.home_improvement

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    I think if you build that, you will be in very good shape! Those filters are much better at collecting fine dust than the filters that split systems usually come with (which are more like a very...

    I think if you build that, you will be in very good shape! Those filters are much better at collecting fine dust than the filters that split systems usually come with (which are more like a very fine bug mesh).

    1 vote
  4. Comment on A journey into the shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma controversy in ~health

    RoyalHenOil
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I think this is likely quite OK. I suspect that switching frequently between different daycare centers (or nannies, etc.) could potentially be a problem, but seeing the same people day after day...

    I think this is likely quite OK. I suspect that switching frequently between different daycare centers (or nannies, etc.) could potentially be a problem, but seeing the same people day after day probably registers as having a large extended family rather than as being separated from family. Adopted children usually do very well in their new homes, so I don't think children are identifying who is and is not a blood relative; they just need the opportunity to form long-term, stable attachments to adults and not have those attachments stretched or severed too much or too often.

    Foster care is particularly tough on kids because it is often very unstable. When I was in foster care (for just five months, due to a false/mistaken accusation that took a while to sort of out due to an overloaded family court system), I was moved between three different foster families during that time and never had the opportunity to form an attachment to anyone. Instead of feeling like I had a new family, it just felt like I had no family. I did still have visitations with my parents, but they were infrequent (like once every two weeks) and very short (like 30 minutes), which is so far from sufficient that it's laughable (very, very dark laughter). I am still dealing with the trauma from that period of my life, and I expect I will for the rest of my life.

    Before foster care, I attended daycare and I was OK with that. I have absolutely no lasting negative feelings about daycare and regard it as one of my happy childhood memories.

    After foster care, I went into my grandparents' custody for a time, and then I moved back in with both my parents. These transitions were not the least bit traumatizing to me because they were between people I felt mutual love and attachment with, and I still saw both groups of people frequently even when I wasn't living with them. I probably could have done this exact transition every six months for the entirety of my childhood and been OK.

    For this reason, I also do not fret too much about children of divorced parents. I know that divorce can be very hard on children in it's own way, but it is not a family separation the way that foster care is. The key, I think, is that the child can continue to maintain connections to loving adults; a change in scenery is nothing compared to that.

    7 votes
  5. Comment on Mini split confusion (efficiency and sizing) in ~life.home_improvement

    RoyalHenOil
    (edited )
    Link
    I live in Australia, and split systems are the norm here. I would recommend looking around at Australian sites when you do your research. Whirlpool is a really helpful forum for discussions like...

    I live in Australia, and split systems are the norm here. I would recommend looking around at Australian sites when you do your research. Whirlpool is a really helpful forum for discussions like this. Just be aware that Australia is a large continent, and some regions here are quite unlike Texas (e.g., Queensland is tropical rainforest, so they have different considerations than, say, South Australia); when climate is relevant, people will mention the region that they are in, but they will not necessarily mention their particular climate challenges (they assume that the readers are already familiar with the different climates around the country).

    My personal experience is that the split systems used around here (southern Victoria, which is a Mediterranean-type climate with hot summers and mild winters — about equivalent to USDA zone 9-10) are more effective at cooling than at heating because cool air sinks down to human level. I also have not known them to fail during hot weather. However, they can struggle to keep up with the heat if they are not powerful enough. I live in a poorly insulated attic above a workshop (which was originally designed to be a wood drying room, not a place for people to live), which is far from ideal for heating and cooling. When we are predicting a very hot day here, we keep the curtains closed all day and we set the A/C to start running at full blast starting early in the morning before it's really needed (we just put on coats), and that keeps it manageable when afternoon hits.

    The only time that strategy really failed for us was one hot day last summer when we had a power outage in the early afternoon that lasted until the evening. Our indoor temperature reached 91°F (33°C) — which was certainly much cooler than it was outside, but still super unpleasant. In a more insulated space or less attic-positioned, the power outage wouldn't have been such a disaster.

    So the other thing I would urge some caution about: does your workshop generate a lot of dust? If so, it will be extra important to stay on top of cleaning the filters. Even so, some especially fine particulate matter will end up inside the split system, which can cause some issues. We (being above a woodworking workshop) had this issue develop over the course of 3-4 years and had to get the unit completely cleaned out, which was not cheap or easy. It didn't cause any lasting damage, but it caused the unit to work less effectively for two reasons: the fan blew at a drastically reduced capacity, and the thermostat was taking incorrect readings and shutting itself off too quickly (which particularly affected the unit's heating ability). It also caused a minor indoor water leak.

    6 votes
  6. Comment on A journey into the shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma controversy in ~health

    RoyalHenOil
    Link
    This is horrible! People drastically underestimate how damaging it is for children to be separated from their families, particularly babies under the age of 2–3. It can cause lifelong trauma...

    This is horrible!

    People drastically underestimate how damaging it is for children to be separated from their families, particularly babies under the age of 2–3. It can cause lifelong trauma symptoms even in children who have no memory of the separation and even when the separation was brief. Taking young children from their families should only ever be done in cases where it will save the child from an even worse fate — but if many cases of shaken baby syndrome are actually misdiagnosed, that means a lot of children have been traumatized completely unnecessarily and will have worse outcomes for the rest of their lives.

    13 votes
  7. Comment on What video games have had you taking real-life notes? in ~games

    RoyalHenOil
    (edited )
    Link
    In addition to some of the games already mentioned, I took a lot of notes for Roadwarden. This is not strictly necessary to play the game, but it helped me organize my thoughts about all the...

    In addition to some of the games already mentioned, I took a lot of notes for Roadwarden. This is not strictly necessary to play the game, but it helped me organize my thoughts about all the different characters and communities so I could prioritize how to help them (or hurt them in some cases).

    Taking notes really helped me feel more immersed in the world as well, seeing how all the characters' stories are deeply interwoven. I really loved this game and I'm eager to replay it and make some different decisions (I space out my replays so that they feel more fresh) because when my partner played it, he learned different information than I did, suggesting that the story is even deeper than I realized.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Welcome to the millennial midlife crisis in ~life

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    I immigrated to rural Australia a decade ago to live with my partner. His family were traditionally poor farmers, and it's a lot like that here. They got a gas stove (upgraded from a cast iron...

    I immigrated to rural Australia a decade ago to live with my partner. His family were traditionally poor farmers, and it's a lot like that here. They got a gas stove (upgraded from a cast iron wood stove) in the 1980s, and my partner's mother was the first person in her family who could drive a car when she got her driver's license around 1960.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Box office: ‘Furiosa’ just barely beats ‘The Garfield Movie’ in disastrous Memorial Day weekend — the worst in decades in ~movies

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    For me, it's not even that my home theater experience has gotten better; it's that the movie theater experience has gotten so bad that I find it actively unpleasant. I used to love going to the...

    For me, it's not even that my home theater experience has gotten better; it's that the movie theater experience has gotten so bad that I find it actively unpleasant. I used to love going to the theater many years ago, but the last several times I went, the movies were played way too loud and the sound mixing was muddy.

    My set up at home is not impressive (I pretty much just watch movies on my computer or tablet), but being able to adjust the volume and reduce the bass if necessary means I can actually immerse myself in the movie.

    9 votes
  10. Comment on 3D printing - A beginner's observations and some practical applications in ~creative

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    Oh, I'm not familiar with that kind of thimble. I should try it. Mine is designed to be used like a tailor's thimble, but the side that I push with is flattened and has a rim around it (inspired...

    Oh, I'm not familiar with that kind of thimble. I should try it.

    Mine is designed to be used like a tailor's thimble, but the side that I push with is flattened and has a rim around it (inspired by the tip of a raised-edge quilter's thimble). It's shaped to my thumb to ensure that the flat side is always oriented correctly behind the needle eye.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on 3D printing - A beginner's observations and some practical applications in ~creative

    RoyalHenOil
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It's nothing exciting. You can buy them (they look like this), but being able to print your own means you can make them more specialized for specific sewing projects — for example, for assorted...

    It's nothing exciting. You can buy them (they look like this), but being able to print your own means you can make them more specialized for specific sewing projects — for example, for assorted concave or convex curves.

  12. Comment on Google just updated its algorithm. The Internet will never be the same. in ~tech

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    I prefer it for the great majority of my searches. When I first started using it, I felt like it was basically on par with Google, but now it really feels like a big backward step when I open a...

    I prefer it for the great majority of my searches. When I first started using it, I felt like it was basically on par with Google, but now it really feels like a big backward step when I open a new browser and accidentally do a Google search when I thought I was doing a Kagi search. I'm not sure if Google has gotten worse, if Kagi has gotten better, or if it's just various customizations I've made to my Kagi search results over time — it's quite possibly all three — but I don't think I could go back now.

    Mind you, I am not a subscription kind of person. I don't do Netflix, Spotify, etc., etc., because I am basically allergic to the financial complexity that comes with them; I have to really get a lot of value from a product to be willing to subscribe, and I'm not willing to subscribe to more than about 3-4 services at a given time (I will cancel one to start a new one, even if they are totally different classes of product, just to keep my total subscription number as small as reasonably possible). But Kagi's service is worth it to me and I feel good about supporting them.

    That being said, there are a couple of cases where I will use both Kagi and Google in conjunction:

    • When searching for the cheapest place to buy a specific product, or when searching for a broader selection of products to choose from, I find that Kagi and Google give me very different results, so it's worthwhile to have a look at both sets of results. Usually Kagi will find me more obscure shops, which usually have better deals and a more unusual selection (for example, Kagi recently saved me about $80 on a $175 tool by finding an up-and-coming tool shop that's trying to break into the market with some incredible deals), but not always.
    • When searching for images, Google usually gives me better results. At this stage, Kagi disobeys quotations marks when I do an image search, so I get more junk results mixed in, and it also returns fewer images. However, it often gives me different results from Google, so I still check both. I hope/expect that Kagi's image search will be improved in the future, but I think regular search is their priority right now (which is fair; I do regular searches way more than I do image searches).

    I still use Google only for video searches or map searches.

    16 votes
  13. Comment on 3D printing - A beginner's observations and some practical applications in ~creative

    RoyalHenOil
    Link
    We have a 3D printer, which we received as a gift, and we have used it a lot more than we expected to. We overwhelmingly use it to make repairs or improvements around the house. I'm mostly the one...

    We have a 3D printer, which we received as a gift, and we have used it a lot more than we expected to. We overwhelmingly use it to make repairs or improvements around the house.

    I'm mostly the one who uses it because I am more interested/experienced in 3D modeling.

    Here are some examples of things we made with it:

    • A replacement seal for the shower door. (It is a non-standard design, so we couldn't just buy a new one.)
    • An adjustable brace to fix a broken monitor stand.
    • A specialized waterproof case around an outdoor ethernet coupling.
    • A specialized waterproof case around the outdoor DC connection the powers the solenoid valve to my irrigation system. (I have plans to update this design for operating multiple solenoid valves; the plastic case will effectively be the hub.)
    • A replacement part for a broken needle felting tool. (I have plans to design new needle felting tools altogether because all of the ones I have — and I have quite a few of different makes and designs — have various flaws or drawbacks that would be very easy to fix.)
    • A thimble specially fitted to my thumb and specially shaped for the way I prefer use thimbles (to forcibly push needles through dense layers of cloth).
    • A template for custom ladder hooks for securely attaching our ladder to the our ceiling beams (we made the actual hooks out of wood because that's stronger, but 3D printing allowed us to test and perfect the design much more easily and cheaply).
    • A soap press for combining small pieces of soap into a bigger Frankenstein bar of soap.
    • A funnel that attaches two shampoo bottles mouth-to-mouth (so that the last bit of shampoo/conditioner in the old bottle can be added to the new bottle).
    • Tools for making seedling pots out of newspaper.
    • Assorted gears designed to be driven with our hand drill (useful for converting hand-cranked tools, such as yarn winders, into something much quicker).
    • A guide for directing fabric through a sewing machine (embedded with a magnet so it attaches to the needle plate).
    • And many more. These are the ones I immediately called to mind.

    We do download some files for what we need, but the great majority of our projects call for 3D modelling because what we are making is extremely specialized. My 3D modelling experience is with vertex modelling (think Blender or Maya), not CAD, but I use the free version of Fusion 360 for most 3D printing tasks because it is so simple and quick for the kinds of things we print. Fortunately it's a lot easier than vertex modelling!

    I only know two other people who have 3D printers. One of them uses it for his various Arduino project, and the other uses it to make assorted tools and things for her silversmithing and gem setting business. She also does lost PLA casting (which is like lost wax casting) using designs she models in Blender.

    7 votes
  14. Comment on ‘Deny, denounce, delay’: the battle over the risk of ultra-processed foods in ~food

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    When you refine whole grain flour, you get both white flour and bran. They are both equally processed because they are created simultaneously through the same process. White flour is less healthy...

    When you refine whole grain flour, you get both white flour and bran. They are both equally processed because they are created simultaneously through the same process. White flour is less healthy than whole grain flour, but bran is more healthy than whole grain flour.

    It's the nutritional value of the ingredients that we should focus on, not the degree of processing. Processing is a red herring; yes, it can be used to make extra unhealthy ingredients, but it can equally be used to make extra healthy ingredients.

    It's not difficult to assess how healthy or unhealthy a given food product is, so why don't we just do that instead of focusing on hard-to-define proxy that does not even correlate that well?

    13 votes
  15. Comment on Rubbing your eyes is way more harmful than you think in ~health

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    I got so fed up with eyelashes and eyebrow hairs getting into my eyes that I adopted this habit, which I highly recommend: Every day, gentle tug all along your eyelashes and eyebrows to pull out...

    I got so fed up with eyelashes and eyebrow hairs getting into my eyes that I adopted this habit, which I highly recommend:

    Every day, gentle tug all along your eyelashes and eyebrows to pull out any loose hairs. I usually get a few loose hairs per day, so getting rid of them manually can dramatically reduce the risk of one of them randomly falling into your eyes.

    4 votes
  16. Comment on Congo names third American in a foiled coup plot as mourners gather in Utah to remember plot leader in ~news

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    The US-centric nature of this article is painting a misleading picture. This was a Congolese political party attempting to seize power during a political crisis. Its leader, Chritian Malanga, was...

    The US-centric nature of this article is painting a misleading picture.

    This was a Congolese political party attempting to seize power during a political crisis. Its leader, Chritian Malanga, was a Congolese man who lived in the US for a portion of his life as a political refugee, and his son, Marcel Malanga, was born in the US during that time (making him a US citizen).

    I don't know about the third American mentioned in the article, but there were also British and Canadian citizens involved. The political party operated primarily outside of Congo due to political persecution, and so it is not surprising that some of its members had dual citizenship in the countries where they resided as refugees or as children of refugees.

    41 votes
  17. Comment on The most mispronounced brand from every country in ~humanities.languages

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    In many cases, companies will designate different pronunciations in different countries. For example, when I moved from the US to Australia, I was startled by the pronunciation of "Nissan" here....

    Now with brands we have an interesting case because you could say that the company may dictate how its name is pronounced.

    In many cases, companies will designate different pronunciations in different countries.

    For example, when I moved from the US to Australia, I was startled by the pronunciation of "Nissan" here. Americans say something like "NEE-SAHN" (or "NEE- SARN" for any non-rhotic speakers reading this), while Australians say something like "NIS-in". But this is actually the way that the company itself pronounces its own name in each country: official Nissan TV commercials all say "NEE-SAHN" in the US and "NIS-in" in Australia.

    Both of these pronunciations differ from the Japanese pronunciation, but it seems pretty unfair to call them mispronunciations when Nissan itself promotes these pronunciations.

    14 votes
  18. Comment on The most mispronounced brand from every country in ~humanities.languages

    RoyalHenOil
    Link Parent
    B and V are also pronounced pretty differently between German English. BMW is pronounced something like "bay em vay". However, I think it's incorrect to expect an acronym to be pronounced the...

    B and V are also pronounced pretty differently between German English. BMW is pronounced something like "bay em vay".

    However, I think it's incorrect to expect an acronym to be pronounced the exact same way across all languages. Unless the acronym is actually pronounced as a word (like "laser", which is an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation"), it's just a string of letters, and I think those letters should be pronounced consistently with the language being spoken.

    9 votes
  19. Comment on What kinds of part time jobs did you do when you first entered the job market? in ~life

    RoyalHenOil
    (edited )
    Link
    In high school, I had a part-time job working at a professional photo lab (most doing wedding photography) where I scanned film and did some basic touching up. I also did other occasional or...

    In high school, I had a part-time job working at a professional photo lab (most doing wedding photography) where I scanned film and did some basic touching up. I also did other occasional or seasonal jobs: babysitting, odd yard work jobs for neighbors, filling syringes with flu serum, and working at the polls during elections.

    As a university student, I had a part-time job working at a research museum. They were in the process of moving their extensive ichthyology collection into a larger warehouse (a former mall, actually), and I was brought on to help inventory the collection and check for specimens that needed maintenance.

    Later, I got a part-time job working in a lab of one of my professors, where I was tasked with separating roots from soil samples, dehydrating them, and weighing them. I also did some field work for the lab, which mostly consisted of setting up experimental sites (basically mapping out several small plots in the forest, weeding, cutting and splitting wood, and digging trenches).

    When I immigrated overseas, my visa limited me to seasonal work, so I got a job doing physical labor on a farm: planting, weeding, pruning, harvesting, greenhouse repair, etc. (When I got my full visa, they promoted me into a proper research job in the R&D department and I stayed for eight years.)

    Right before I immigrated, I had a part-time job offer that I really badly want to do, but the timing just didn't work out (I got the offer about a month before I moved): I participated in a zombie walk, and there were some people there there scouting for talent for one of those real-life zombie shooter games. They really wanted to hire me, but I already had my plane ticket and my visa. I would have delayed my immigration plans for six months for that job if I could have; I can't think of any job that would be as fun, except maybe being a white water rafting guide.

    4 votes
  20. Comment on Microsoft confirms Windows 11 Recall AI hardware requirements in ~tech

    RoyalHenOil
    Link
    "Recall" is an unfortunate name, particularly for something like an AI product, which people are already pretty nervous about. It brings to mind product recalls due to faulty or dangerous design.

    "Recall" is an unfortunate name, particularly for something like an AI product, which people are already pretty nervous about. It brings to mind product recalls due to faulty or dangerous design.

    12 votes