cardigan's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's a video game that you really want to exist? in ~games

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    I'd like to see a statistically complex RPG or MMORPG that doesn't depend on killing, beating up, or maiming living beings for one's progression. As important to the genre as it is, that fact has...

    I'd like to see a statistically complex RPG or MMORPG that doesn't depend on killing, beating up, or maiming living beings for one's progression.

    As important to the genre as it is, that fact has never sat right with me, even in games where the enemies are purely spiritual or demonic. All I mean by "statistically complex" is more or less a normal RPG, where the values of multiple stats are important. However, in my perfect game, these would be multiple stats unrelated to combat.

    As far as I know, this has never been done, and it may go against the grain of what an RPG is supposed to be. It's possible to do a pacifist playthrough in games like Undertale, but if anything this is just an evasion of the combat system. It's also harder to be a pacifist than it is not to be one. What I'm interested in is a game where pacifism is the default, and where it is in fact more difficult for the player should they choose to kill something.

    I don't know of anything that comes close to this, but we might have missed a chance with it in FFXIV 1.0. Before the game was scrapped, it seemed as though the devs were hinting at plans to allow players to progress through the narrative as a crafting class: a situation where you'd, say, make Titan some bread rather than beat the stuffing out of him. That never materialized in 2.0 and beyond.

    11 votes
  2. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (September 2022) in ~talk

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    After a month where it was almost nonexistent, my body dysmorphia came back last night in what I can only describe as an "attack." A persistent, sustained obsession with how ugly and inhuman I...

    After a month where it was almost nonexistent, my body dysmorphia came back last night in what I can only describe as an "attack." A persistent, sustained obsession with how ugly and inhuman I appear to myself to be kept me awake through the night. It was torture. Seemingly triggered by nothing, spinning around and around, making up for lost time. The only thought that wasn't about my body that was able to break through to me was an unrelated snippet of a Mountain Goats song, and how JD delivers it here: "..made too much of it, but I drank it all." I clung to it like a raft. I don't know why.

    This feeling will never go away so long as I'm in this body. I thought I had reconciled myself to that. I guess I was wrong. Today, I'm so tired I seem drunk and dissociative. All the same thoughts, now stagnant instead of swirling.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on What have you been watching / reading this week? (Anime/Manga) in ~anime

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    Now that I've finally gotten a physical copy, I've been reading the first and so far only printed volume of the web manga 光が死んだ夏 (The Summer Hikaru Died). I don't know much about manga and even...

    Now that I've finally gotten a physical copy, I've been reading the first and so far only printed volume of the web manga 光が死んだ夏 (The Summer Hikaru Died). I don't know much about manga and even less about BL, but I really like what I've read of this one. I'm not reading it in English, so I'll try to get the terms across to the best of my ability. All of what I write below happens in the first two chapters and is summarized on the back flap of the book, so I wouldn't consider it a spoiler.

    The setup goes something like this: Yoshiki and Hikaru have been friends since childhood. They've both spent their whole lives in a backwater town in the Kansai region. Yoshiki has feelings for Hikaru that he's never expressed, which become all the more intense once Hikaru goes missing in the mountains for a week and a half. When Hikaru does miraculously return, Yoshiki's keen enough to notice that what came back from the mountains isn't Hikaru. He doesn't speak with quite the same intonation and though he has all of Hikaru's memories, something's just off about him. Yoshiki calls this new Hikaru "the Something" (ナニカ) and starts making an interesting distinction between Hikaru his friend (written 光) and Hikaru the Something (written ヒカル). He confronts him about this and gets the "other" Hikaru to admit that he's actually a monster who's inhabiting Hikaru's body, one the locals call the Mind Stealer (脳裏抜け). Even though he claims that Hikaru was already dead when he took over his body, the Something still threatens to kill Yoshiki if he reveals the secret. Turns out the Something desperately longs to be human. Yoshiki finds that he's still in love with Hikaru the Something; what's worse, the Something intimates that the real Hikaru was in love with him. That's where things pick up.

    What first drew me in was seeing the cover of the first volume. The art really succeeds at depicting Hikaru in such a way that's just a little bit creepy without going over the top. Lest my convoluted explanation throw someone off, I want to emphasize that the overall feel of the series is a sort of vulnerable and unsettling yearning, nailing both the BL and horror aspects. I'm not at all surprised that it's started winning awards. The second volume doesn't come out until October, so I'm trying to pace myself -- but I'm loving it.

    My language chops aren't great, but there's one thing I should mention in case anyone's going to try and read it in Japanese: get ready for extensive Kansai-ben. Though I can plod along through most things, I'm unused to works where every character is from Kansai, so there have been two or three places where I just had to move on because I couldn't parse what someone was saying. Unfortunately, it's usually Hikaru.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on What's an underrated, cancelled, or largely forgotten show that you really love? in ~tv

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    Sometimes I feel like one of the only (or only remaining) fans of the 1999-2002 series Roswell, not to be confused with the reimagined version Roswell, New Mexico, which will air its last episode...
    • Exemplary

    Sometimes I feel like one of the only (or only remaining) fans of the 1999-2002 series Roswell, not to be confused with the reimagined version Roswell, New Mexico, which will air its last episode next week. I feel lucky to have had Roswell play such a role in my life. It was there for me through difficult times.

    Part of the appeal must be a "time and a place" sort of thing, but it's also a "person" sort of thing. Only a particular sort of person will respond positively to a show so overflowingly sentimental that it has a theme song by Dido. Only a particular sort of person could get invested in a show that hinges so much on a single and unshakable romantic pairing. Even through its ineffective "monster of the week" season, Max and Liz were what kept its viewers anchored. Roswell's fans needed to know they came out okay, which explains much of the write-in campaign that "saved" the show for another, concluding season after it was canceled. Think Dawson's Creek amped up to eleven, throw in a few glowing crystals and alien hieroglyphics, and you're almost there. Its showrunner Jason Katims went onto head Friday Night Lights, so you're also close if you swap the footballs out with UFOs and add a steadicam.

    I don't know who the "particular sort of person" that responds to Roswell is, or what they're like, because I hardly know what I myself am like. But I can take a guess: it's the sort of person who grew up feeling like they had a secret that they couldn't share with anyone. Roswell, New Mexico has a number of good qualities, but there is one place where the original Roswell will always win: it is imperative that a show like this be set in a high school. Why? Because of the setup: that there are some people who may look just like everyone else, but who are in fact aliens; that these people must hide in plain sight so as not to be misunderstood; that these people are, for reasons that they can't understand, pursued by people who want to kill them. Any small town queer high schooler can relate to this, as can plenty of other people. The premise is like a gift from heaven for vulnerable adolescents, because it is almost uniquely suited to speak to adolescent vulnerability.

    The signs of the show's impact on my life are all around, now that I look at them. Our apartment wifi network has long been a Roswell reference. We have two small, almost unnoticeable props that were used in the show in our living room. I've written my share of fanfiction and played a small role in the creation of an authoritative fan cut of the series, since the DVD release swapped out all the sentimental pop songs with public domain beats.

    These things are all superficial. What matters is that Roswell spoke to me and encouraged me on a deep level. Perhaps it's not very good "objectively," as though that meant something. It doesn't matter. It was there for me when I needed it. It even helps me in the present, imprinted on my memory, and providing the same reassurance that it's okay to feel the way I do even though the fear and shame has perpetuated into my late twenties. I'm grateful to it for that. And, though I've never been one for getting starstruck, you can better believe that I'd lose my mind and turn into an absolute, crying wreck if I ran into one of the cast. Because with them, I felt things. They were my friends when I was too weird and alone to have friends.

    Besides, it's just like Max says: "what's so great about normal?"

    6 votes
  5. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

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    I've been watching Hannibal about ten years after the fact. It's hard to imagine it aired on NBC. Given how violent it is, it's not the sort of thing I'd usually be interested in, but I find the...

    I've been watching Hannibal about ten years after the fact. It's hard to imagine it aired on NBC. Given how violent it is, it's not the sort of thing I'd usually be interested in, but I find the imagery and especially the dialogue absolutely mesmerizing. Every few episodes has a line that ends up having a strange and self-consciously obscure poetic beauty to it that I just adore.

    Since they can really occur at any time, the context isn't too important. One that I wrote down and which comes to mind is the lead character Will Graham saying: "It feels as if I'm talking to his shadow suspended on dust." Another: "I stared at [him] and the space opposite me assumed the shape of a man filled with dark and swarming flies." It's worth noting that, on a visual level, neither of these things happened. The character isn't recounting anything. Hannibal's imagery shows a lot of "out there" stuff, but from what I remember we never saw that particular character as a mass of flies. So when Will suddenly rattles one off like that in the same sedate way he says everything, it's spellbinding for me.

    All the performances are great, but Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal) and Hugh Dancy (Will) are on another level. It always seems to me like they're exploring unknown territory in terms of television acting, as their characters have an intimacy with each other that's hard to describe. It's at times erotic, but to say that's all that it is would be an injustice to their performances. It's better described as a level of closeness between two people that just doesn't normally happen. When paired with all the intrigue and murder investigations, it's something totally arresting to watch play out.

    Some spoiling notes on where I'm at (end of season 2):

    I'm two episodes away from the second season finale. I'm not completely sure, but it seems that Will is still trying to entrap Hannibal, as in the last episode that I watched, he had that strange exchange with the Verger heir and it was revealed Freddie was still alive.

    I'm actually surprised by how much I wanted Will to be a friend to Hannibal: for their "courtship" and crime spree to continue. An episode we recently watched ended with a shot of their two faces superimposed upon each other, and I was so stunned by that image and the intimacy of what proceeded it that it got me shouting an "oh my god!" at the screen while watching it with my brother, which almost never happens.

    That being said, I'm totally over "flash forward" setups. It was disappointing when the season began with one, with Jack visiting Hannibal and getting stabbed. I've been glad to see that they only had the one flash forward scene that I can remember, and aside from that trope the writing has been engaging and unpredictable.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

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    I'm playing The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky SC (英雄伝説 空の軌跡 SC) for the PSP (on a Raspberry Pi 4). If you're unfamiliar, Trails is a phenomenally ambitious JRPG series that takes a "human...

    I'm playing The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky SC (英雄伝説 空の軌跡 SC) for the PSP (on a Raspberry Pi 4).

    If you're unfamiliar, Trails is a phenomenally ambitious JRPG series that takes a "human comedy" approach to things by putting a lot of effort into worldbuilding. Almost every one of the many NPCs in the game gets a dialogue or location change after a plot event, meaning that the only thing more ambitious than writing the Trails script in the first place is undertaking a translation* of it. Every sub-series within the Trails series takes place in a different country or continent of the same fictional world, with characters from previous arcs making appearances in the later games. At least, that's how it's been described to me, as SC ("Second Chapter") is only the second game in the series overall. After the eleventh game total came out in Japan last year, the series producer Kondo Toshinoro quipped that the series was "about half over." Considering how huge and complex it is already, that's sort of awe-inducing, so it's no surprise to me that Kondo frequently mentions in interviews that Trails is his "life's work." Video game or not, corporation or not, that's something I respect.

    FC was a charming and unhurried game with great characterization and a stellar payoff. SC begins minutes after FC ended, so things feels pretty continuous. Apparently Falcom did originally intend it to be one game rather than two, but they were forced to split it up after a certain point. That's understandable, since my playthrough of FC ended at around 101:00 hours logged. SC is supposedly around 50% longer. In any case, I'm glad I took a break of almost a year between them.

    I've managed to stay totally unspoiled on the plot points and am trying not to have too many expectations, but so far I'm a little concerned about how Second Chapter seems to be veering into stereotypical "shadowy organization seeks world domination" tropes. Still, it's so charming that I wouldn't mind all that much if things end up going in that direction.

    As I'm playing in Japanese and don't have perfect proficiency, I look up the (usually military) terms I don't recognize by searching the game script on the Trails in the Database fansite. That, too, is an incredible effort and has been a great help to me. I can't think of a fansite that's easier or more enjoyable to use. I'd be gutted if it were ever shut down.


    *: I should note that this article begins with some talk about a member of the localization staff's suicidal ideation and depression, which is alone a good picture of what translating it must have been like.

    7 votes
  7. Where's all the Creative Commons-licensed fiction?

    Given the popularity of using Creative Commons licenses for photos and sound samples, I'm surprised that I can't find a large collection of CC-licensed fiction anywhere. I feel that I must be...

    Given the popularity of using Creative Commons licenses for photos and sound samples, I'm surprised that I can't find a large collection of CC-licensed fiction anywhere. I feel that I must be missing something, because if the Wikipedia category is to be believed, there's far fewer books out there than I expected, and all of those listed are under schemes like CC-BY-NC-ND. I realize that any book listed on that page has to meet Wikipedia's notability guidelines, but there are so few "notable" ones collected there that it makes me think that there are very few of them in general.

    Is there some obvious place authors publish these that I don't know about? I looked around the Internet Archive, but I haven't turned up very much. Most of what I do turn up there are old works that have entered the public domain, and that's not what I mean.

    I ask because I'm finishing my first novel. My plan has always been to pay an editor out of pocket to go through it, and then just put it out there online, gratis and under CC0. I expected to find some obvious place to do that and a more or less established community of people who already do that. Yet in all of my searching I haven't been able to find a site like that or even one other CC0 novel. That's why I feel like I must be missing something. Otherwise, it's just such a bleak picture.

    Apologies for my ignorance or if this is a bad place to post.

    8 votes
  8. Comment on Little Moz onstage with Morrissey (San Luis Obispo, 05/12/22) in ~music

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    This warmed my heart to see, and I relate to the experience. I know what that feels like. I hope it will always be a happy memory for him.

    This warmed my heart to see, and I relate to the experience. I know what that feels like. I hope it will always be a happy memory for him.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on Does anyone here have daydreams so intense that they can't think about anything else? in ~talk

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    I have done this for as long as I can remember, and am like you in that I do it in part to escape my body, and that I want to live as the person I imagine. It isn't always the same person, but I...

    I have done this for as long as I can remember, and am like you in that I do it in part to escape my body, and that I want to live as the person I imagine. It isn't always the same person, but I never imagine being myself, either. When things get worse for me, I go deeper into my daydreams. Often, I want it to happen, and encourage it, so that I can get out of whatever situation I'm in.

    It's difficult to explain what it's like to people who don't picture things that vividly. I don't seriously see or hear anything; it's more that I have the awareness or memory that I've just seen or heard something, in the same way that I "remember" seeing a door close seconds after it happened. This is how it can become dangerous, as once it's in that state, everything just blends together -- the things that really happened, and the things that didn't.

    Although it's been going on for years, I've only recently started writing fiction to try and channel it. That helps and hurts: helping by giving it some outlet, and hurting in the sense that as it gets more elaborate, it's more tempting for me to dissociate from life.

    5 votes
  10. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

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    I am playing Mother (Earthbound Beginnings) for the Famicom. I've never played any of the games in the series, despite being a fan of JRPGs. I've just arrived in the second main town,...

    I am playing Mother (Earthbound Beginnings) for the Famicom. I've never played any of the games in the series, despite being a fan of JRPGs.

    I've just arrived in the second main town, Thanksgiving, and Lloid has just joined the party. Right now, I'm walking around and looking for Duncan's factory, so that Lloid can shoot off his bottle rocket.

    I'm not using a guide and have an imperfect understanding of Japanese, so there have been a few places where I've gotten stuck. An embarrassing example of this was that I didn't think to keep talking to the Forgotten Man, and turned around and walked all the way back up through the underground stream, only to run out of places to go and try again hours of playtime later. On the other hand, I've been good about knowing when to use telepathy, which my friend tells me is where some people get stuck.

    Truthfully, I was never all that interested in the series before I heard a friend talking passionately about it. I assumed it was just a quirky little send-up of 1980s America. What sold me on it was when my friend mentioned that the title wasn't arbitrary, and that at least Mother 1 was about "a mother's love." Hearing that touched me, so I decided to play it.

    Minor spoilers, and thoughts about what that might mean:

    I'm getting the feeling that there's a deep current of emotion running below the game's surface. The first intimation I had of this was the melody's poignancy: even when getting the first note from the baby doll. There was something about that tune that made me want to cry, and I felt the same way about the flawed or incomplete motherhood being hinted at. There is something inherently sad about a broken music box inside of a broken doll. This feeling has persisted through the other notes, some of which are collected in other "motherly" situations, like Song Princess Laura's singing the melody out in joy when you return her chick to her.

    But the main place this has come through for me, and the single most touching moment of my playthrough so far, is something one of Queen Mary's clown(?) attendants says to you. It goes something like this: "Everyone in Magicant knows that you don't belong here, but we don't care, because we consider you to be our friend. Just remember that you can always come back here, because everyone here loves you."

    I've been a misfit my whole life, so that touched me more than I can really say.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on What changes are you looking to make in 2022? in ~talk

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    I need to find a way to get over an intense but peculiar kind of social anxiety that I have, one which I can't really seem to find any help with or resources about. But despite having more or less...

    I need to find a way to get over an intense but peculiar kind of social anxiety that I have, one which I can't really seem to find any help with or resources about. But despite having more or less the same level of social anxiety as other "anxious" people, I am extremely and unpredictably afraid of certain kinds of communication: typically things like text messages, letters, forum comments, and emails.

    I can't recall ever having an experience bad enough with one of those to make me this afraid of them. It doesn't matter how close I am to the person, as I've neglected opening things I've received from my best friend in the world for over a year before and on more than one occasion, just because I've been afraid of what it might say. I would get panic attacks every time I thought about it. This extends to every other part of my life: things as simple as bills; texts from people I'm trying to plan something with; answers to yes or no questions; whatever. Sometimes they're fine, and sometimes they throw me into an acute state of panic. I hate it, and often do wish I could be invisible and inaudible so that I wouldn't have to deal with it. Then, I get depressed because I feel invisible, and everything starts over again.

    So, that's what I hope to change.

    8 votes
  12. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

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    I'm playing Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne on the Switch. The mood that this game evokes is completely captivating, and I can't say that I've ever played one with the same approach. Even among...

    I'm playing Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne on the Switch.

    The mood that this game evokes is completely captivating, and I can't say that I've ever played one with the same approach. Even among other "post-apocalyptic" works, there certainly aren't many that begin with the annihilation of all life on the planet, or perhaps not so much life. Fifteen to thirty minutes into your playthrough, the human race has been extinguished save for the five people who coincidentally happened to be in the same building. As everyone else is quick to tell you, the main character is no longer human, having been changed into a demon by a living, maggot-like jewel placed into his mouth in a chilling scene. I'm not sure whether everyone else is truly dead or if they've just been radically transformed; the game calls them 思念体, "thought bodies," which make me think of some kind of residual image.

    I've started and stopped other SMT games, and while all seem to deal with the aftermath of some apocalyptic event, one which brings demons into the real world, they haven't had the same melancholy or lonely mood that Nocturne does. Maybe it's something in the character design. Of the five humans left alive, all of them have eyes that seem empty and distant, and I imagine this "empty" feeling is what leads some people to find it boring. Outside of cutscenes that seem few and far between, those characters don't appear, leaving the protagonist running around a bunch of derelict warehouses and train stations by himself and a party of demons that aren't given much characterization. That only helps to make it seem even sadder and emptier.

    Yet things get poignant when the protagonist's old friends do appear. The game turns on how the current world is only the "conception" of another, and how each character wants to recreate the world in their image. From what I understand, each is given at least one "speech" scene to state their case before the player decides between them.

    Spoilers for what characters believe what

    Of these, I've only seen Chiaki's scene, in which she makes the case that the old world had "too many" things in it: "too many people, too many buildings" that contributed nothing to its value. Her goal is to pursue the world of "confusion" or chaos, and create one of competition, where only the strong will survive. Being somewhat familiar with SMT, I figured there would be "law," "chaos," and "neutral" routes, but I was surprised to see Chiaki as the representative of the chaotic route. She's given a line that reads something like "After the world ended, I stopped grieving; instead, I began thinking of what made the world what it was." I know that voice acting wasn't in the original PS2 release, but the actress really brings out the resignation involved in making a statement like that. The art design does, too, as the speech is given against a white background, with Chiaki standing in a classroom made up of the silhouettes of students rather than real people.

    I'm about to enter the Ikebukuro Tunnel, so have heard some of Hikawa's reasoning for wanting to create the world of "stillness." And while he hasn't gone into depth, I'm surprised by Isamu's abrupt change of character and decision to "find the truth for himself," which I imagine will lead to the neutral ending.

    As a side note: My Japanese isn't good enough for me to understand the choices of ヨスガ (縁?), ムスビ (結び?), and 静寂 for the ending names. Before playing, 静寂 is the only word I'd ever come across before, and apart from 静寂, I don't immediately see the connection between those words and the character philosophies relating to them, but I'm also being extremely careful not to spoil myself.

    The game allows you to switch difficulties, but I'm playing on hard mode, just to stay with it longer and help re-enforce its bleak tone. I definitely plan on playing long enough to see all of the endings for myself.

    From a technical perspective, the Switch port isn't very good. Certain demons and locations will cause the framerate to stutter every time they appear on screen, and in at least one instance I can remember a cutscene slowing things down to a crawl. None of this is hindering my enjoyment of it, though.

    6 votes
  13. Comment on What useless information do you have memorized? in ~talk

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    Dic, duc, fac, and fer are the four main (or only?) irregular second-person singular imperatives in Latin.

    Dic, duc, fac, and fer are the four main (or only?) irregular second-person singular imperatives in Latin.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Learning math / mathematical reasoning as an adult in ~science

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    It's comforting to hear so many people saying that they struggle with arithmetic but excel in calculus and algebra. I also never stopped to consider that the bottom-up approach might be...

    It's comforting to hear so many people saying that they struggle with arithmetic but excel in calculus and algebra. I also never stopped to consider that the bottom-up approach might be detrimental to an adult learner, but what you've written makes a lot of sense. Thanks very much.

    5 votes
  15. Comment on Learning math / mathematical reasoning as an adult in ~science

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    Thanks for taking the time to respond. I never stopped to consider that arithmetic and higher math require two different skill sets, so it's encouraging to see it echoed so strongly in the...

    Thanks for taking the time to respond. I never stopped to consider that arithmetic and higher math require two different skill sets, so it's encouraging to see it echoed so strongly in the comments here.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on What are your favorite bits of more juvenile humor? in ~talk

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    I'm a sucker for pretty much all of Will Ferrell's Saturday Night Live sketches, particularly Dr. Beaman, the Welshly Arms hotel, the old prospector, and his Harry Caray impersonation. None of his...

    I'm a sucker for pretty much all of Will Ferrell's Saturday Night Live sketches, particularly Dr. Beaman, the Welshly Arms hotel, the old prospector, and his Harry Caray impersonation. None of his movies really did anything for me, but his skits are classic.

    3 votes
  17. Learning math / mathematical reasoning as an adult

    For a very, very long time, I've had a strange but persistent envy of people who have good "logical" thinking skills or who can do math well. I wish that I was the type of person who could play...

    For a very, very long time, I've had a strange but persistent envy of people who have good "logical" thinking skills or who can do math well. I wish that I was the type of person who could play chess to even a passable degree, as I'm convinced a toddler could beat me. But most of all, I wish I could learn something like calculus, which has held a strange allure for me even as a young kid. But I was failing math as early as the fifth grade, and do not remember even an iota of information about geometry or trigonometry. Ultimately, I dropped out of school altogether.

    A year or so ago I started in the "pre-K" mathematics category of Khan Academy, because I had such a low opinion of my own abilities. Sure enough, I breezed by it, but even found some parts of the second or third grade curriculum difficult. It's like I was born completely without numerical ability, but I don't want to go so far as to say I have something like dyscalculia, as I at least read analog clocks and musical notation on a daily basis, and have no problem discerning if a number is bigger or smaller than another. I'm also decidedly not aphantastic; quite the opposite. Something I do have is an extreme distrust or even hatred of my own critical thinking abilities. If I mess up simple arithmetic, I'll beat myself up mentally for being "stupid," or an "idiot," and so on for way too long. It's a habit I learned early. Complicating matters is that I'm in my mid-twenties, so my neuroplasticity is probably not great. In fact, one of my deepest fears is that it's too late for me to learn any new subject to a competent degree.

    This might be a ridiculous thing to say, but I'm hoping someone can reassure me that it's possible to learn math as an adult, even for a "hopeless" case like me. If you've been in a similar situation and have found particular resources helpful, I'd really like to see them. Khan Academy wasn't really my thing, but if it's more or less the best option for someone like me, I'll try it again.

    22 votes
  18. Comment on "What has been happening across the arts is not a recession. It is not even a depression. It is a catastrophe." in ~arts

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    I make a living as an artist. Growing up where I did, my getting an artistic "education" would have been absolutely unthinkable without peer-to-peer networks. I lived miles away from any sort of...

    I make a living as an artist. Growing up where I did, my getting an artistic "education" would have been absolutely unthinkable without peer-to-peer networks. I lived miles away from any sort of library system, let alone one that stocked the things I needed to see. No one in my family attended college, and I dropped out of high school. Without the Internet, I have no clue what type of person I would have become. Sharing those files made and saved my life.

    Anyone who writes the phrase "the scandal of free content" in earnest, as this author does, is guilty of the most reprehensible classism and should be ashamed of themselves.

    18 votes
  19. Comment on Spirited Away meets Heidegger: We killed the gods with technology in ~humanities

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    An English translation of the Der Spiegel interview -- which Heidegger only permitted to be published after his death -- is available here. It's the source of his remarks on the reappearance of...

    An English translation of the Der Spiegel interview -- which Heidegger only permitted to be published after his death -- is available here. It's the source of his remarks on the reappearance of "the god[s]."