feigneddork's recent activity

  1. Comment on Lemmy, an open-source federated Reddit alternative, gets funding for development in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    I feel the opposite - I find Lemmy's design to be pretty great and intuitive to follow (especially coming from reddit) and the themes are pretty decent (I'm absolutely loving the i386 theme)....

    I feel the opposite - I find Lemmy's design to be pretty great and intuitive to follow (especially coming from reddit) and the themes are pretty decent (I'm absolutely loving the i386 theme). Tildes doesn't really have anything quite that dorky.

    I will say there are two things I have issues with Lemmy personally after using it for a day or two:

    • It's pretty slow. It takes a few seconds to just load content, which is honestly driving me mad. Tildes never had this problem as far as I could tell.
    • It has downvotes. After using Tildes and the lack of downvotes, I honestly cannot imagine any other way to have discussions online. The downvote is just unnecessary noise and drama in the disguise of "content filtering".

    I'm actually liking both. Tildes for the general social stuff, Lemmy for the more nerdy techie stuff.

    6 votes
  2. Comment on Google blew a ten-year lead in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    It definitely made me think really carefully about if I could trust any of Google’s services, even if I paid for them. Say what you want about Microsoft and Apple, but they’ve been in the software...

    It definitely made me think really carefully about if I could trust any of Google’s services, even if I paid for them.

    Say what you want about Microsoft and Apple, but they’ve been in the software game for a long time, and - unless the product is an absolute flop - are used to supporting software for a considerable amount of time.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on Google blew a ten-year lead in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    Honestly I was in the same boat as you until I bought a cheap second hand iPhone and just stuck to it. After a while my issues with the iPhone gradually faded and I stopped caring about Android....

    Honestly I was in the same boat as you until I bought a cheap second hand iPhone and just stuck to it.

    After a while my issues with the iPhone gradually faded and I stopped caring about Android. No quite 100% there on Apple fanboy Ian, but in a way I respect iOS (secure os with data consent at pretty much every step of the way) and macOS (as someone who loved Linux but finds a lot of the time I’m fighting silly things about the os) the macOS is a godsend in terms of just getting on with things.

    But of course everyone has their own take on iOS/macOS and that’s valid too.

    9 votes
  4. Comment on Google blew a ten-year lead in ~tech

    feigneddork
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    This is actually pretty spot on to why I’ve moved over from Google. Also applies a bit with Microsoft Windows (although I find Office 365 too much of a bargain to drop, especially when you...

    This is actually pretty spot on to why I’ve moved over from Google. Also applies a bit with Microsoft Windows (although I find Office 365 too much of a bargain to drop, especially when you consider they include OneDrive for the price that’s less than Dropbox).

    I used to be a Google/Android die hard enthusiast. I looked at Apple as this company that was slow, lacked real innovation, and stupidly expensive. It was such a laughing stock from an Android fan’s perspective. Why would I ever move to iOS? Did you see how much Android progressed with Ice Cream Sandwich? These Nexus devices are incredible.

    Not to mention that Google we’re just brimming with crazy, unique software that was unlike anything in terms of how niche yet useful it was. Google Reader. Gmail. The whole calendar/drive/office suite. It was mind boggling I’d get this so easily and for free? Are you kidding? Oh what’s that? Google knows everything about what I do? Who cares? this stuff is almost like gold in terms of value in my life!

    And then something happened. I have no idea internally, but it started with the end of Google Reader/the birth of Google Plus. Ever since that point, Google as a software company was never the same. Gone were these little cool bits of software that under any company would never exist because they have no use. Gone was the Nexus product line. Gone was the crazy innovations under Android.

    Suddenly Google’s software became just like every other big corporation - low risk, low effort. I’ve moaned in the past about Google’s product killing spree, and to me it is a real panic, especially given their track record. But mainly I miss the craziness of Google’s products - even iGoogle, something I would never use myself, but it showed Google had a sense of personality, like a group of people has this cool idea and then just built it themselves to fit their needs.

    I’ve pretty much moved to the Apple ecosystem recently - MacBook Pro, iPad, iPhone, AirPods. In happy with what I get from Apple, but in all honesty I do miss the old Google.

    21 votes
  5. Comment on Increasing personal security online and Yubikey in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    Hmm, I checked and it turns out that I did set it up, but for some reason it doesn't work in my current browser, which is Firefox. It's incredibly puzzling.

    Hmm, I checked and it turns out that I did set it up, but for some reason it doesn't work in my current browser, which is Firefox.

    It's incredibly puzzling.

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Increasing personal security online and Yubikey in ~tech

    feigneddork
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    So I have two Yubikeys - one is Yubikey 4, and the other is Yubikey 4C. Personally I see little downsides outside of the usual "I'm downstairs trying to access GitHub/GitLab and then the website...

    So I have two Yubikeys - one is Yubikey 4, and the other is Yubikey 4C.

    Personally I see little downsides outside of the usual "I'm downstairs trying to access GitHub/GitLab and then the website asks me for my Yubikey, so I rush upstairs to get it, come downstairs, and enter it and go ahead". There's even the little issue of some websites/browsers timeout so you have to do all of this again.

    That's pretty minor compared to the Yubikey security. It's dead simple to set up and use - when a website asks for two factor auth, you plug in the Yubikey and then hit the button. Then going forward you will need to plug in the Yubikey and press the button and you're good to go.

    Services that I use that require my Yubikey:

    • Google (sometimes I use their services although I'm trying to strip back my usage and succeeding)
    • Github
    • Gitlab
    • AWS
    • Fastmail
    • Facebook
    • Lastpass
    • Bitwarden

    Services I wished used Yubikey:

    • Microsoft (they apparently have support for security keys, but my browser doesn't support it? It's Firefox, I've managed to sign in with my Yubikey with the above devices)
    • Twitter
    • Apple (they have their own proprietary 2FA mechanism)
    • Amazon (yup, AWS supports Yubikey, but not Amazon)
    • Paypal
    • eBay
    • Steam
    • Epic Games store
    • Rockstar Games Launcher
    • Origin
    • Basically any store/service that potentially involves me spending £££, has my credit card details, or has items worth £££

    So far it's mainly used to stop people accessing code/services/infrastructure potentially worth ££££ to customers. I wish it was used all over because of the convenience (signing up and using).

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2020 Livestream & Discussion (starts 10AM June 22 PT / 5PM June 23 UTC) in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    That is at the very least great to see that level of diversity at the very least.

    That is at the very least great to see that level of diversity at the very least.

  8. Comment on Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2020 Livestream & Discussion (starts 10AM June 22 PT / 5PM June 23 UTC) in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    From what I've seen, the jailbreak community has fixed these issues years ago too. If I had to guess, Apple had bigger fish to fry? Either way, I'm happy that it's there now. And from what I can...

    From what I've seen, the jailbreak community has fixed these issues years ago too. If I had to guess, Apple had bigger fish to fry?

    Either way, I'm happy that it's there now. And from what I can tell, it will show up across iPhone and iPad. Maybe the new macOS too, especially given their new UI framework seems to be made to integrate iOS components into macOS.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2020 Livestream & Discussion (starts 10AM June 22 PT / 5PM June 23 UTC) in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    Some people have pointed out that the WWDC had only one black person presenting. I missed out on a good chunk of it and had to catch up via blogs, but that is immensely disappointing. I've always...

    Some people have pointed out that the WWDC had only one black person presenting. I missed out on a good chunk of it and had to catch up via blogs, but that is immensely disappointing.

    I've always known that Apple has had a diversity problem in terms of WWDC, but if it is true then Apple really need to really step up.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2020 Livestream & Discussion (starts 10AM June 22 PT / 5PM June 23 UTC) in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link
    Normally I'm pretty skeptical of Apple's announcements and WWDC events because it always felt like a bunch of hype for nothing. Coming from years of Windows/Android usage, Apple's announcements...

    Normally I'm pretty skeptical of Apple's announcements and WWDC events because it always felt like a bunch of hype for nothing. Coming from years of Windows/Android usage, Apple's announcements don't really wow me as much.

    However, I wish I actually tuned in from the start for this one. There were just a ton of features that they've got planned which I'm super excited to get:

    iOS

    • Calls no longer taking up full screen
    • Able to change default browser and mail
    • Better privacy features such as indication when camera/microphone is being used.
    • Being able to give approx location data.
    • Being upfront about data collection practices - it is self reported, so it is something that can be abused. However with Apple's scrunity during app review process (a process I've been through mutliple times), I'm confident that in time they will build practices to assess and enforce accurate details.
    • iPadOS allows turning handwriting into text
    • App Clips - no need to download a full app to gain access to special benefits of the app.

    Android users will roll their eyes at some of these changes, but as someone who has been using iOS for quite some time, the OS is actually really great except for some of these minor niggles. It's wasn't enough to make me want to move back to Android. Now these features will be in iOS, I don't think I'll seriously miss Android.

    macOS

    • macOS turns 11!
    • New UI which looks like it supports touch interfaces - a sign of the future, perhaps?
    • Updated Safari I use Firefox, but if Safari steps up its game (especially with extensions), I'm more than happy to switch over.
    • Updated Messages. I thought Messages was getting stale, but they went ahead and basically ported the iOS version over. Nice!
    • Better notifications. I would prefer if I could just turn off the pane and get notifications that come and go. One day...

    Hardware

    • Airpods will seamlessly switch across devices. I have a pair of Airpods Pro and I was instantly disappointed it couldn't do this from the get go. I feel a bit more better about this integration. However, I wish the noise cancelling was better.
    • Airpods Pro getting spacial audio. Wasn't expecting that. I love the idea of this!

    And the big one, which deserves it's own heading tbh

    Transition to custom Apple Ax silicon

    • Faster speeds and better battery life??? AAAAAAAAAAAA GIMME GIMME GIMME
    • Support for existing iOS apps out of the box.
    • Native support for Virtualisation - better support for Linux apps!?!?! AAAAAAAAAAAA

    I honestly love this update. I don't think I've ever been so excited for the technical future as I am now. I'm under no illusion that it will be gradual, but finally some honest-to-god innovation, and by a company with a track record of doing this very well. Who knows, my next desktop PC might be an Mac with an Apple chip inside!

    12 votes
  11. Comment on Cyberpunk 2077 release date delayed to November 19, 2020 (from Sept. 17) in ~games

    feigneddork
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    I'm not surprised, seeing as how last time developers were saying they were cutting it pretty close. It sucks to hear because I'm pretty sure these guys have been crunching hard to get this game...

    I'm not surprised, seeing as how last time developers were saying they were cutting it pretty close.

    It sucks to hear because I'm pretty sure these guys have been crunching hard to get this game ready when it clearly wasn't.

    I just wish the two people in this letter would keep their mouths shut and work on it at a decent, suitable (read: non crunch) pace until the game is actually nearly ready, and then make announcements etc.

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Apple doubles down on its right to profit from other businesses in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    The problem is that we are talking about phones and the competition. Sadly it is down to Apple's iOS and Google's Android. If this was the PC platform, it would be a different conversation*. I had...

    The problem is that we are talking about phones and the competition. Sadly it is down to Apple's iOS and Google's Android. If this was the PC platform, it would be a different conversation*.

    I had a look at Librem 5. As someone with a decent salary, if the product is ethical and compatible with my lifestyle, then I'm more than happy to invest in a phone (I'd say if it was genuinely ethical I'd be willing to spend up to £800-£1000 depending on features). Looking at Librem 5 (and assume it's actually selling and hardware is fine), it is a phone that is a Linux phone, so I'm already missing out on a killer app like WhatsApp.

    You can explain to me that WhatsApp is owned by Facebook and it is a terrible app. I know this. I'm convinced myself. The hardest part is convincing others. Believe me - I've moved to iPhone and it's hilarious that I struggle to convince family members to send me messages through iMessage considering I'm one of the last people to own an iPhone (my brother is truly the last), and I wanted that so I can carry on with work on my Mac, but reply when I'm free.

    And that's just WhatsApp. What about social media messaging apps? What about maps applications (I need to use my phone to take me places when driving). What about 2FA apps? There is a whole ecosystem that will need to be filled in with this new ecosystem under Librem 5.

    Apple and Google know it's near impossible for a new contender to come in and steal it's thunder. Microsoft tried and failed. These days they are doing much better in terms of business decisions, and even now that they are getting back to making rational business decisions, they won't make their own mobile OS - their upcoming phones (Surface Duo and Surface Note) are running Android.

    Let that sink in - a multi-billion dollar company who will happily challenge Google on their search engine (Google has 92.1% market share) and browser market (Chrome has 69.8% market share), and Apple/Google on their tablet OS share (Apple: 19.3%, Google: 57.8%), will not challenge the mobile market.

    So going back to iPhone vs Android, I agree with your points, but I eventually weighed it up and I felt like Google actively and willingly did more harm to users than Apple - including being anticompetitive with their search practices, with AMP, with ads, and is spent the most on lobbying (which isn't necessarily bad in itself, but I'm pretty sure Google are spending the most to keep a hold on its power). On top of Google's shenanigans, when you pick an Android phone and if you care about ethics, you have to think carefully about the manufacturer as well. Half of the time it doesn't even matter since it's usually made in a place where the people are poor and are forced to manufacture these devices under excruciating circumstances.

    That's not to say what Apple are doing isn't terrible. I've watched Louis Rossman's videos and I'm aware at how unbelievably anti-competitive Apple can be. I'm aware of the slowdown of iPhones (which I'll stick my neck out and say that the idea wasn't bad, it was the fact that true to Apple, they never gave the customer the option to choose between slow device and a weaker battery). And I'm utterly appalled by the treatment of Uyghur Muslims in China and the weak response by Apple. But as of now, I'd rather have an iPhone and get away with the many continuous horrible practices of Google. I know that in the future, that will very likely change as nothing remains the same.


    *With one exception - I am a Mac, Windows, and (barely) Linux user. I have the Mac despite the fact I loathe Apple's designs, their anti-consumer policies, and their expensive hardware for comparatively little value. I have it because I develop iOS apps for very real customers - with one of my clients, 75% of their customers are iPhone users. I can't just ignore that market, I have to cater to it. And because I have to cater to it, I have to own a Mac because Apple makes it impossible to do iOS development outside of Mac.

    Before that I was using an Ubuntu Mate Linux machine at work and I was incredibly happy with it as it cost me little hassle for lots of freedom in development (something both Mac and Windows are comparatively weak at).

    Even if I stop using an iPhone, how do I stop 75% of my client's customers using iPhone and use a better alternative?

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Apple doubles down on its right to profit from other businesses in ~tech

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    Personally, I made the move to an iPhone this year from Android because: Google's obsession to violating your privacy at every corner. It was actually giving me a headache at thinking of the many...

    Personally, I made the move to an iPhone this year from Android because:

    • Google's obsession to violating your privacy at every corner. It was actually giving me a headache at thinking of the many ways to try and successfully de-Google my phone without going so far as to flash ROMs and all that business.
    • Google are plain terrible at supporting products if "tHe DaTa" doesn't allow it, no matter how good the idea is.
    • There was a point in Android's lifecycle where there was such massive innovation that I found it bewildering why anyone would go with iPhones. Now they've slowed down, and the features that they add aren't all that enticing.
    • I had the OnePlus 7T Pro from the OnePlus 3T. I went from £450 to £750 and I really did not feel like the phone justified the increased cost. With 5G on the way, the price is only going to get worse.
    • Cheap phones that are decently spec'd under Android are usually by companies with the absolute worst privacy policies I've ever seen. Compare that to iPhone where it nags me constantly to review when it thinks there is any data that is potentially valuable to me that might be sent off. I can even read the raw JSON analytics data my iPhone generates.

    As of now, I think the iPhone is fine, but you raise good points. Ultimately it sort of boils down to there being no ethical consumption under capitalism and all that.

    9 votes
  14. Comment on Time to upgrade your monitor - Optimizing a display setup for programming in ~comp

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    I'm trying to get scaling like it is under Windows, where my 4K monitor is at 150% and the 2k monitor is at 100%. Ubuntu does technically allow incremental scaling, but it comes with asterisks...

    I'm trying to get scaling like it is under Windows, where my 4K monitor is at 150% and the 2k monitor is at 100%.

    Ubuntu does technically allow incremental scaling, but it comes with asterisks including worse performance and increased power usage.

    I've tried scaling like on Windows, but then everything becomes incredibly jittery. I scale at 100% and I feel like I need binoculars when I'm 30cm away from my monitor. 200% and it feels like a massive waste of space.

    And if I change the scaling options too much, Ubuntu Linux black screens and I have to reboot the entire machine.

    If I was dealing with one monitor, I think I wouldn't have nearly as much hassle. But two different monitors at two different resolutions? That really throws Ubuntu in a loop.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Time to upgrade your monitor - Optimizing a display setup for programming in ~comp

    feigneddork
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    He has a lot of opinions on monitors, fonts, scaling and whatnot. I don't agree with a lot of it on a personal level, but I'm glad he's getting some mileage out of his setup. I have 2 27" monitors...

    He has a lot of opinions on monitors, fonts, scaling and whatnot. I don't agree with a lot of it on a personal level, but I'm glad he's getting some mileage out of his setup.

    I have 2 27" monitors - one is a BenQ EL2870U 4k monitor, and the other is a Dell U2715H 2k monitor.

    I bought the 4k monitor because I wanted to see what the fidelity was like at such a high resolution. With zero scaling, things are a bit hard to read (I'm short sighted), but under Windows, I cranked up scaling to 150% and it works really well.

    I've also connected the Dell Monitor, which is alongside it with 100% scaling and honestly that is perfect to me.

    In hindsight, I wish I got the two Dell Monitors instead of the 4k one. The BenQ monitor has a few flickering issues and once you get over the initial excitement of having a 4k monitor, it doesn't really offer that much over the 2k apart from pretty pixels.

    That, and trying to get scaling working under Ubuntu 20.04 has been an absolute nightmare. So much so that I've pretty much abandoned that distro and gone back to Windows (it isn't just scaling, mind. It's lots of little tiny things that I don't have the time nor the energy to faff around with).

    3 votes
  16. Comment on How the Nintendo Switch prevents downgrades by irreparably blowing its own fuses in ~comp

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    I think it was a lot of things, from (I'm guessing) the escalating costs of developing a game for that platform Mobile gaming sort of exploding around that time A lack of strong marketing from...

    I think it was a lot of things, from

    • (I'm guessing) the escalating costs of developing a game for that platform
    • Mobile gaming sort of exploding around that time
    • A lack of strong marketing from Sony. I saw PSP ads everywhere. I saw PS Vita advertised alongside PS4 eventually, but never really it's own thing in terms of TV/billboard marketing.
    • Not the biggest factor, but it did play a part - proprietary, expensive memory sticks. When I heard how much my brother paid for like a 16GB stick (as of now it's £60 in the UK) I couldn't justify buying a system with those sorts of hidden costs.

    It's a shame, because I think they could've learned some lessons from Nintendo - Nintendo always sells decent, relaible but cheap/old tech with a high markup price. As a result, they make bank from every single console and every single game.

    I don't think the PS Vita needed to go that far, but they could cutdown on the excess things like a touchscreen back (even the touchscreen front if I'm being honest) and a simpler SD card system would've done wonders for the system.

    4 votes
  17. Comment on How the Nintendo Switch prevents downgrades by irreparably blowing its own fuses in ~comp

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    I don't thin the PSP failed. While it didn't sell as well as the Nintendo DS, 84 mill units sold isn't anything to sniff at. The PS Vita, however. Yeah, that definitely smells like a failure,...

    I don't thin the PSP failed. While it didn't sell as well as the Nintendo DS, 84 mill units sold isn't anything to sniff at.

    The PS Vita, however. Yeah, that definitely smells like a failure, estimates say it sold 16 mill units (Sony won't give figures which is very telling).

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Basecamp’s founders are trying to start an email rebellion with hey.com in ~tech

    feigneddork
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    I had a look yesterday and it's OK but here are the issues I have with HEY: $99/year is crazy money just for Email alone. I have Fastmail which costs me $52/year (I bought for 3 years) and that...

    I had a look yesterday and it's OK but here are the issues I have with HEY:

    • $99/year is crazy money just for Email alone. I have Fastmail which costs me $52/year (I bought for 3 years) and that has email, calendar, contacts, todo, storage etc. I don't even use the storage, but it's there and ready for me to use. If you need email, I'm pretty sure you can find cheaper, nonfree alternatives.
    • Not being able to set up your own domain and be stuck with hey's domain is essentially them forcing their users to market their email application. They go on about how they don't use signatures, but when your email address is *@hey.com, there isn't need for a signature to advertise.
    • They claim email as of now is all hacky and obsolete etc. Here's the thing - it just works and it has worked for decades. Anyone gets an email, they get an inbox, they get emails coming into it. People who want more sophistication can use filters to move their emails to other folders in the workflow. That isn't a hack, that's by design - simple for those who want simplicity, complexity who wants complexity. If anything, this software feels like the biggest hack applied on top of emails, and at it's core, it's just filters and a glorified UI.
    • The features that they advertise that is such a game changer is utterly overkill for someone who like me doesn't share their email around, doesn't use email to communicate that often (especially in a world of IM & social media), saves attachments to cloud storage so I can access it across all systems, Notifications can easily be sorted by again applying filters on emails so they are read in the inbox, but I get so little as I don't really hand it out that often.
    • The biggest privacy feature that could convince someone like me over to a new app is an equivalent to Apple's Sign in email relay feature, Mozilla's Firefox Private Relay service, or Idbloc.co's private relay service (I currently use Idbloc.co's service). Disappointingly, it's nowhere to be found in HEY.
    • As other people have said, it's entirely proprietary software. It doesn't look like I can integrate it into any of my mailing systems. The software has to be incredibly groundbreaking to be worth switching to essentially another ecosystem. I don't believe HEY is there.

    I've been following DHH on Twitter so I've heard all about his crusade for privacy for a number of months (even years now) so naturally HEY really tries to hammer the point. They even include a "Blocking email spies" feature which

    1. I've done some work with email marketing and email services, and it's often used to see if the email that you are sending is even opened, and hence you can think of actually sending emails that are useful to your customers instead of pointlessly spamming them. I don't really see them as nefarious as this page claims.
    2. HEY has a tracking pixel on their pages. They do make it clear on their privacy policy page that they do collect this info for analytical purposes and if I'm being truly honest I wouldn't have cared at all about this existing, but it does seem a bit hypocritical given how they make an effort to nuke it from emails but they keep it on their website.

    But if it was just about the pixel thing, I doubt I would care - I found that comical in an ironic way. The bullet points combined together really do good job of not selling HEY to me at all. But then again, I'm pretty sure I'm not their customer and this may be for a certain group of people. And if it works for them, more power to them.

    14 votes
  19. Comment on PlayStation 5 - Reveal event in ~games

    feigneddork
    Link Parent
    That's fair enough. After trying GTA V once and spending about half an hour min to join a game I'm forever scarred for life from R*'s open world multiplayer games. I know RDR2 is different, but I...

    That's fair enough. After trying GTA V once and spending about half an hour min to join a game I'm forever scarred for life from R*'s open world multiplayer games.

    I know RDR2 is different, but I just do not feel inspired at all to put myself through that.

  20. Comment on PlayStation 5 - Reveal event in ~games

    feigneddork
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    It was a good event, but I couldn't help but laugh at the GTA V reveal and all the comments on social media based off it. I get that GTA V is the money spinner for R*, and I fully expect them to...

    It was a good event, but I couldn't help but laugh at the GTA V reveal and all the comments on social media based off it.

    I get that GTA V is the money spinner for R*, and I fully expect them to port it onto PS5, but did people really need an announcement for it? Because all it makes me think is "what about Red Dead Redemption 2?" I know RDR2 hasn't been as successful for R* as GTA V (and it shows through announcements like these and the fact that the PC port has been pretty terrible).

    Oh well, at least it was funny.

    2 votes