precise's recent activity

  1. Do something

    TW: Violence and language. Just the other night I heard a native dude got capped, white nationalist on the other end, but nobody heard much after that. No news, no cops, no justice no peace, and...

    TW: Violence and language.

    Just the other night I heard a native dude got capped, white nationalist on the other end, but nobody heard much after that. No news, no cops, no justice no peace, and people wonder why we are calling to defund the police. Come to find out that dude had drugs, it was a meth deal gone bad.

    Ain't need to worry about it son, just ignore it and move on...

    Hold the fucking phone, why does it matter? You tellin’ me that dudes life ain't worth the crime blotter, an obit or some sort of after the fact reaction?

    But he had drugs man, shit happens...

    Man I hear this shit from privileged folk all the time but to hear it come from the streets... This dude didn’t matter because he had a problem, this human deduced to drugs and addiction, no longer my problem. I would say he’s just now a statistic but I’m not even sure if he’s that. This town is god damn silent on injustices and violent crime at that. 4 stabbings and 1 shooting, stuff that stokes fear, nobody goes near. Meanwhile all the townsfolk just cry about the homeless problem and drink their bougie beer.

    Dude you need to settle down you didn’t even know him…

    Motherfucker don’t tell me to settle down, don’t tell me it don’t matter because I didn’t even know him. How many white kids get shot in schools every day to get their obit, their memorial, their presidential postmortem? How about the victims in the towers? We went to fucking war over that shit, why did they matter? How can all lives matter when this dude over here lying on a slab can’t seem to become any sort of subject matter?

    Man that’s just how it is…

    No shut the fuck up, that’s not how it is. I refuse to accept an existence in this world where a life ain't worth the bullet that ended it. Don’t hide behind your cynicism and whataboutism because you just can’t be arsed to offer up any sort of emotional reactionism. That dude...

    Dude…

    No, you listen to me while I remind you what the hell humanity and empathy are. That dude had a family and friends, just like you, he had a life and a history and so much ahead of him too. He had ninety nine point nine percent the same genes as you yet you can’t seem to empathize that that could have been you.

    Dude then go fucking do something.

    5 votes
  2. Occupation

    Occupied by the primal cries of democracy and its dying eyes. Ain't no reason to keep pushing some days the infighting the outfighting the needless highlighting of differences in ourselves and...

    Occupied by the primal cries of democracy and its dying eyes.
    Ain't no reason to keep pushing some days the infighting the outfighting the needless highlighting of differences in ourselves and others, not some injustice just arbitrary maladjustment.
    These words ain't here to minimize or demoralize but to quantify and qualify the true enemy.
    We are cannibals, our self absorption and self adornment lead to self consumption and our mutually assured destruction.
    As we consume we forget we need to resume what we started, we assume that we’ve done enough and that the movement will carry on without us.
    It’s too late, in the death throws of Democracy we choose a different path, without occupation, preceded by preoccupation, we now find ourselves the subject of this new occupation.

    4 votes
  3. On apathy

    Hello again! There have been quite a few posts on Tildes as of late that have rubbed my opinionated brain the wrong way. The purpose here is to have a conversation about apathy in general, less...

    Hello again!

    There have been quite a few posts on Tildes as of late that have rubbed my opinionated brain the wrong way. The purpose here is to have a conversation about apathy in general, less focused on political or social issues and more on why we've seen an increase in apathy. This isn't a public shaming or an attack on anybody in particular. Apathy is at an all time high universally, and we've had several conversations here on Tildes where it has come into play in front of important issues.

    ...Everything's fucked. We are totally and utterly done for. 2020 is the worst year ever, I want a time machine. We are all going to die. Why does any of this even matter?...

    I think we've all seen some variant of that sentiment this year, especially on the internet. It has been rough: COVID-19, the rise of fascism, climate change and ongoing political and social strife around the world. It is quite the cluster! It has been almost impossible for most of us to not look away at some point or another: turn off the news, disconnect the internet, run off into the woods (that's me!), self-isolate (thanks 'rona!) This is all entirely understandable. It's perfectly acceptable to do this for mental health reasons.

    Let's be real though, 2020 has been rough, but let's get even more cynical, shall we? In the last two decades we've seen endless war and suffering in the middle east and elsewhere, we've noticed an ongoing rise in extremism all over the world, we saw the towers fall, we've witnessed school shooting after school shooting after school shooting after school shooting, we have (Yes, we. You may have voted for someone else, but we all have a hand in this democracy.) put a fascist in office (yeah, that was going on 4 years ago), we've seen so much horrible shit happen.

    2020 isn't the outlier, I'd posit it's a combination of being the culmination of decades of growing strife and the sudden realization that total societal collapse (in a way) and the dangers that much of the 3rd and developing worlds have been facing for centuries can happen right here, right now, in our comftorable first world nations.

    So looking at these factors, it is easy to see why apathy has grown, right? I mean, in the face of all of this adversity it'd be hard to not get discouraged. We see the powers at be spins their wheels and balk at solutions; train after train screaming down the tracks, the brake lever sitting right there, we scream and scream, "PULL THE FUCKING LEVER"... they don't. For whatever reason, be it money or self interest or whatever... they don't. So yeah, fuck this system! These people are supposed to do our bidding and they don't. These leaders can't even lead, so why the fuck do we even bother? How many times does this happen? How many people do we need to elect to fix our system? How many votes, protests, rallies, legislative sessions, meetings, politician offices, social media posts? How much effort have we put in, how much does it take? I'm so fucking tired. I give up. Why the fuck do we even bother?

    We've all been in this place, and I think some of us don't want to think about it. We don't want to question why we feel this way, why political and social systems are broken, FUBAR. I'd suggest that some people feel a related guilt, they know they could be doing more but... insert excuse here. I'd venture to guess some people just honestly don't care, true apathy. Fueled by a lack of empathy that in my opinion comes from the numbness associated with witnessing atrocity after tragedy after trauma via the internet. This doesn't account for all of the apathetic populations in the world, but I think topically it covers a good portion.

    So what do we do? I could rant all day about why we need to be on the streets. I could lecture about how a functioning society is a privilege and that it takes good willed effort to maintain. I could soapbox for the rest of my life about how a functioning democracy is not just a privilege but a requirement and that, it too, takes effort. That's not what I want to do though! Me or somebody else talking to people about apathy most often turns into talking at the apathetic masses. Talking at isn't a conversation and it almost never bears fruit.

    So Tildes, I defer to you. What do you think we need to do to reform our society and political system to a functioning point? How do we stoke people to make the effort? As it is currently, that won't happen in America it seems. So what's the solution? We know why there is apathy, how do we beat it?

    10 votes
  4. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    Do you mind expounding on your views a bit more? I've found quite the opposite, when protests are done right, when massive amounts of continuous pressure are exerted on the powers that be, they...

    Do you mind expounding on your views a bit more? I've found quite the opposite, when protests are done right, when massive amounts of continuous pressure are exerted on the powers that be, they are effective. I've seen substantial change enacted because of movements I've been a part of.

    The point of a protest is to make politicians listen, protests are so much more than just flooding the streets. Going to relevant political meetings, tracking down and forcing conversations with representatives, getting businesses and financial backers of said politicians on board, all of these actions are entirely effective. It's just people don't always see that, but without the mass crowds you can't spread awareness and get public support in the first place. Those two elements lead into the other actions. It's a process, not a all at once type situation.

    So the police beat some of us up? Sometimes, yes. I'd posit that with the current issue of racial equity at hand, that if you're scared of being beaten up you're the type of person who we need most with us on the streets.

    So that's my experience. So I guess my main question is, if the system is totally and utterly fucked up beyond repair, then what do we do? Are we just going to cry about it on the internet and then accost the people that are trying to fix it? Are there other actions that you feel are more effective?

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    While going out into large events like that is risky, studies have shown COVID-19 infection rates are markedly lower in outdoors settings vs. indoors. Also, in my view protesters should be wearing...

    While going out into large events like that is risky, studies have shown COVID-19 infection rates are markedly lower in outdoors settings vs. indoors. Also, in my view protesters should be wearing masks. In recent history I've explained to people they are harming our movement's reputation and others by not wearing masks. Our group also has medics and other leaders carrying around disposable masks for people without. So far, haven't had an issue :).

    Also, this pandemic ain't ending anytime soon. I know this is a silly thing to posit, but I feel the need to say it because it's a glaringly obvious problem... Since the pandemic ain't going away, are we just going to let fascism reign while we hide...?

    5 votes
  6. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    The protests to protect Net Neutrality maybe aren't the best example, but I figured they'd be tangentially pertinent. Between both of our experiences muddling our way through politics and the...

    The protests to protect Net Neutrality maybe aren't the best example, but I figured they'd be tangentially pertinent. Between both of our experiences muddling our way through politics and the internet, I figured it'd be a common experience :).

    But it sounds like the protest may have served another purpose, which was rallying the protesters with heroic, memorable deeds. Maybe that turns out to be important in the long run?

    That is the point of a protest, while our assemblage in DC was a protest, in hindsight you could classify it as more of a rally. I think most people (myself included) knew the FCC didn't give two shits about 200 people standing in the cold. That's why I bring up the banner held up from inside the building, that's a moral and rallying victory. To rally public support, to change the optics of the protests in the eye of the general public and to make the idea of Net Neutrality and our efforts to save it so much more real were the end goals. To a majority of people on the internet, there was no real life representation of this struggle. It was all hashtags, petitions, and other social media; to show the world that there are people who all strongly agree on this one thing and that we are showing up, that was the end goal and result. As I said, more of a rally in hindsight :). It's unfortunate how things ended up, but if nobody had shown up I'd posit we would be in a worse position to exercise and embrace our civic duties in the face of federal agencies.

    The reason petitions were so useful and impressive in history was because they were so damn difficult. With the advent of internet petitions, said ilk has been rendered insignificant. It's not uncommon for internet petitions to go viral and get thousands of signatures in a day or two. Legally recognized petitions, that have all signatures collected in person and are audited are still impressive, but those are less common now-a-days. Especially as the levels of apathy of the general populous increases. Why would we try an in person petition that takes dozens if not hundreds of volunteers and actual legal work when we can start this virtual petition. Honestly, most online petitions, even since their advent, have just been virtue signals for people who believe in something but can't be arsed to do anything else about it. That's my personal opinion though.

    This is why I argue that we need to attend in person protests. In person protests make the issue at hand real, it rallies public support, and it is much more in your face. You can scroll by a social media post for some online petition, but you can't exactly do the same when we crowd the streets. So maybe in person protests don't "work" right off the bat, but it's a hell of a lot harder for the people we are protesting against to just press the delete key and get rid of us.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    Regarding your mental health... I'm an activist and suffer from mental illness, and I have to take steps back. If I could, I'd be on the streets and in government buildings every day....

    Regarding your mental health... I'm an activist and suffer from mental illness, and I have to take steps back. If I could, I'd be on the streets and in government buildings every day. Realistically, even though I'm entirely free to do that right now, mentally I need to take breaks too. If you can't mentally or physically make it to a protest, that is nothing to feel guilty about. That you are taking the action where you can is awesome, and I hope you can keep it up!

    That said, if you ever feel up to going to a protest, most of them have some sort of social media presence (even if they are hard to find lol). When I first started out, I would find groups and their events and then go hang out nearby for a bit. Generally people watch and observe, not only to look for safety issues, but to also build up the confidence to get involved. It's gotten easier over the years, but I still recall those first rallies and protests and being anxious as hell, all the time.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I agree with much of what you've said here. A productive, effective protest is difficult to stage. You either need large contingents of sympathetic outsiders who you are targeting, or you need...

    I agree with much of what you've said here. A productive, effective protest is difficult to stage. You either need large contingents of sympathetic outsiders who you are targeting, or you need large numbers and consistency.

    It's unclear whether in-person protests are strictly necessary?

    They are!!!! How many Facebook pages, twitter hashtags, online petitions and other internet based protests have we seen, with millions of supporters? How many have worked? One you are probably familiar with is the FCC's call for comments on Net Neutrality! This is a forum literally built to help people protest without hitting the streets, that was thrown into the garbage despite thousands of comments, all under phony pretenses of fraud and hacking. If even the most official online protest through the federal government with a mass of responses was ignored, then what else do we have to do? Hit the streets!

    I stood in front of the FCC building in DC the day of the NN vote, it was so fucking cold, like -20F with windchill, right on the river. We screamed, we yelled, we were so loud that some supporters of NN actually held a banner up on a upper story window IN THE FCC BUILDING. I call that a win, even if we didn't win. We motivated people to take action and we made a point, we were heard. We exercised our first amendment rights, rights that the current administration would gladly take away from certain groups right now.

    So if we should protest is not so much about any particular cause at this point. At this point, in this administration taking us on the expressway to fascism, an administration of increased legal scrutiny of its enemies and boogeymen, an administration of lies, we must be in the streets. If we aren't in the streets, our rights our like muscles, we will eventually lose them.

    In some countries people bang pots and pans, in America we engage in civil disobedience, marches and rallies. We can do nothing less, as anything less is taking a step backward.

    6 votes
  9. Comment on Have you attended any protests lately? Why or why not? in ~talk

    precise
    Link
    I have been attending protests regularly. For a while I was working and my work schedule was generally 7-10 days on and 5-7 days off, so those 5-7 days off were full speed ahead with activist...

    I have been attending protests regularly. For a while I was working and my work schedule was generally 7-10 days on and 5-7 days off, so those 5-7 days off were full speed ahead with activist work. Now that I've (begrudgingly) left my job and I'm floating on savings, pretty much 80-90% of my free time has been working with local civil rights and racial equity groups.

    I don't want to go into detail about my location our who I am working with, but I will say this. I started attending protests regularly after George Floyd's murder, and I've been doing other activist work for various causes for over 8 years on and off. I've fallen into a leadership position with this racial equity group I'm working with and I'm super excited because this is something I feel a need to do, but also being able to bring about change directly rather than just responding to Facebook events is huge. We aren't BLM (hence the vague-ish terms), but we share a majority of the platform and policies. While there are issues we want to avoid with calling ourselves BLM, the big one is this isn't exactly Portland. I'd honestly be scared to have a BLM bumper sticker on my car around here. I guess in this part of the country, the only BLM that matters to a vocal portion of the locals is Bureau of Land Management, and they hate that BLM too.

    Our activities, especially the bigger ones do see bad actors and agitators. We've had to break up fights, ask people to leave and stop vandalism. One of our main tenants that we hold very close is non-violence. I personally believe violence is the voice of the voiceless, but the bottom line is we've got counter protesters and militias who post up with their guns outside of our events to "protect the community". If anybody they perceive to be with us starts something like that, it very easily could turn needlessly violent. We've been able to work with some of them in the past to resolve and deescalate conflicts, but all it takes is one. Next thing you know bullets are flying and the media is painting our entire group as "evil terrorist antifa", and in this town that can mean demonstration permits denied and further threats of violence. I think most members of our inner circle (myself included) have gotten at least one credible death threat that the police don't care about.

    But, as you've seen, the protests continue: people are getting picked up off the streets by non-identified DHS agents, local government has expressed disapproval but it's getting ignored, and fascism is essentially in full effect.

    This terrifies me! We are small enough that I don't think that will happen here, but it can't be happening anywhere. Once we take away the rights for a few... I just don't know what to do besides raise awareness. I think I'm going to run the idea by the group that another policy we call for is some way to get the state to keep the federal agencies out. It would be very easy to sell it as states' rights here, and if we preemptively set a standard in this state I think it could spread. None-the-less, I don't know who to be more scared of, the militias and lone wolves who culture in them, or the police...

    So why do I protest? Well it's about damn time we put the D back in Democracy. The number of conversations I've had (in the dozens) with people who come to our protests and events full of hate and ready to scream at us for being antifa and evil, where both parties have walked away satisfied is huge. I'd posit a majority of America is tired of this division, and even the most strident Trump supporters have left these conversations feeling like they now have a commonality with our group and BIPOC, almost in a common enemy:

    • Sometimes it's the struggles of BIPOC in a systemically racist society (because yes, there are BIPOC individuals who dislike our movement right off the bat).
    • Sometimes it is fascism, even Trump supporters don't like the way this nation is going and explaining things like the aforementioned federal agencies violated constitutional rights.
    • Sometimes it is police brutality, non-BIPOC individuals who feel wronged by the police identify with our group, I've spoken with former skinheads at our rallies who say that they fully support us on that tenant. It's not hard to help even white nationalists who identify with the problems of police brutality understand how BIPOC individuals could be more of a target for such acts.

    My favorite is the large portion of individuals who yell all lives matter at us. To start a conversation is as simple as saying, "Well if all lives matter, don't black lives matter?" It's a logical fallacy when you consider their intended or perceived intent and 99% of the time they want to explain themselves which is productive, even if we don't get a word in.

    So that's why I protest for this, to have conversations. In a community where a large contingent of peoples' instinctual reaction to us is hatred, when we can help teach them why we are here, that there is no need to (or place for) hate, that we come from a place of love, it helps build community so much. I have honestly seen people have weights lifted off of their shoulders, weights of fear and hatred, after they speak with us. We aren't here to destroy your community, we are your community and we are here for unity.

    7 votes
  10. Comment on Digital Lithium in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I guess that gets into the question of whether the internet is needed. In my approximation, it shouldn't be, but the content creators of the internet can't survive if that were the majority public...

    I guess that gets into the question of whether the internet is needed. In my approximation, it shouldn't be, but the content creators of the internet can't survive if that were the majority public opinion. I wish it weren't so, though.

  11. Comment on Digital Lithium in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I don't think we could ever revert back to the stone age. While society is fragile, if it were to "break" I think it would lead to a totalitarian, fascist state rather than a pre-industrial...

    I don't think we could ever revert back to the stone age. While society is fragile, if it were to "break" I think it would lead to a totalitarian, fascist state rather than a pre-industrial civilization. While mankind is truly basic, and at our nature we are truly self centered, I'd suggest there is a small contingent of mankind that prospers on empathy and our humanity, even despite society.

    1 vote
  12. Comment on Digital Lithium in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I am sad in both regards. This world has gotten me so cynical in more ways than one.

    I am sad not because the world is like this but because we could change all the rules whenever we want but we won't.

    I am sad in both regards. This world has gotten me so cynical in more ways than one.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Digital Lithium in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I guess your right, we didn't lose anything, I can't think of an example. That said though, we have so much to gain. I guess I'd pivot my position to one where I'd argue we need to drastically...

    I guess your right, we didn't lose anything, I can't think of an example. That said though, we have so much to gain. I guess I'd pivot my position to one where I'd argue we need to drastically improve in these areas as a society.

    I'd suggest the premise of my reaction to the linked article and observations I've personally made is still sound. There is a lack of empathy and humanity in my view, that we never had it is, while nihilistic, accurate. So how do we change society? This human experience is honestly not one I'm preferential to.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?) in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    Hey, anxiety can be such a job wrecker. I lost another job exclusively to anxiety! There wasn't any discrimination in that situation, but my employer let me work 70 hours a week as a customer...

    Hey, anxiety can be such a job wrecker. I lost another job exclusively to anxiety! There wasn't any discrimination in that situation, but my employer let me work 70 hours a week as a customer facing managed service onsite technician for a year. That's unfortunately bound to get to anyone and looking back I wish they had forced me to pump the brakes. None-the-less, that your manager felt that they had any right at all to come to you about that "complaint" is a huge red flag. "Weird" is subjective at best and there's no real way to address that without taking direct offense. It's incredibly infuriating that something that vague was presented to you in such a manner, doubly so if your struggles with mental health played into it before and after the fact. When you say that you stayed on for another 3 months, that resonated with me. My anxiety kept me from leaving the aforementioned job for several months before I finally had to quit on short notice. My therapist had been urging me to leave for a month before I finally left.

    Lastly, you are not stupid. If you struggle with mental illness, it is just that, an illness. Are people with cancer stupid because they simply have it, have to take time off of work for chemo or because they lose their hair and look "weird"? No. So why the fuck should we be stupid? We aren't. Mental illness can impair ones abilities to make decisions, especially when we don't have someone or a support system in our lives to help us step back, pump the brakes and make better choices.

    Give yourself more credit, you seem like you're getting down on yourself when you don't need to be. I do it to, we are better than we make ourselves out to be.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?) in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I'm super sorry to hear that. Props to you for being so open and assertive about what happened, let the world know! The more people hear these stories the more we can familiarize neurotypical...

    I'm super sorry to hear that. Props to you for being so open and assertive about what happened, let the world know! The more people hear these stories the more we can familiarize neurotypical people with the struggles of neuro-atypical folks. Have you considered going back? Not to that university necessarily but to school in general? Maybe find a school that you know will accommodate you right off the bat?

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?) in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    Yeah, that layoff sounds like a bunch of bullshit to me. That you got direct verbal abuse in response to your schedule change is even worse! I totally get comments like that sticking around with...

    Yeah, that layoff sounds like a bunch of bullshit to me. That you got direct verbal abuse in response to your schedule change is even worse! I totally get comments like that sticking around with you, in your head, they always rear those attached emotions when you need them the least. For me, the foremost comment in my mind for almost a decade was made to me in the 8th grade (I was 13 for anybody not used to the American education system). After being in a new school system for a year, I finally began to open up. I was on the precipice of what would turn out to be a lifelong struggle with mental illness at the time, I was just starting to get assistance, no diagnosis. I had a girl who I barely knew say, "I liked you better when you didn't talk". That one comment, from someone inconsequential, crushed me. So I totally understand, sticks and stones is a bunch of shit, sometimes words can hurt.

    As for the "How did you expect me to take it?" line, I think that's golden to be honest. I honestly wish that a manager in my situation had said something to that measure. It honestly might have pushed me to the point of burning that bridge in a fury of verbal hurling not seen since the 2016 US presidential debates. Honestly, that line was a trap in your case I think, I really do think it was a trap. As you said, there is absolutely no win for you in that situation and all you can do is just tuck your tail and leave. It's absolutely infuriating.

    I'm sorry that you had that experience and I hope you have found a better place since then.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?) in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    Hey, sorry for the late reply! Living in the woods tends to make internet access.. difficult lol. I think you have a good grasp on what's it like to be the person you are in the world, but I am...

    Hey, sorry for the late reply! Living in the woods tends to make internet access.. difficult lol. I think you have a good grasp on what's it like to be the person you are in the world, but I am sorry that it has made you become reclusive in what could otherwise be socially fruitful. I hope we someday see a world, or you someday find a place where you can feel comftorable to be who you are, in your own skin, out in the open.

    Speaking to your comment about normalizing neuro-atypical people, I think that's kind of a latent motivation for me as to why I am so open about my struggles. I have often attributed it to the idea that I've been talking about myself to professionals on a weekly basis most of my adult life, but I think it is more than that. I hope that my assertive attitude when speaking on mental illness and how people struggle, while it might make some people uncomfortable, is part of my contribution to normalizing what is already normal.

    2 votes
  18. Comment on Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?) in ~talk

    precise
    Link Parent
    I'm so sorry that happened to you, thank you for sharing your story. I totally agree that it seems the opposing parties in both of our cases seemed to have the same objective in mind. It's just...

    I'm so sorry that happened to you, thank you for sharing your story. I totally agree that it seems the opposing parties in both of our cases seemed to have the same objective in mind. It's just amazing how common this seems and I think it speaks volumes towards how much work we as a society have to do. That even as of when this article was published in 2011, religious practitioners were still utilizing exorcisms to "treat" what the scientific community clearly recognizes as a spectrum of mental illnesses is mind boggling to me.

    I'm glad I'm not alone in this, but I'm also happy that my sharing has encouraged others to speak to their related experiences. Discrimination hides in darkness.

    2 votes
  19. Digital Lithium

    I'd like to preface this with saying I'm not a super big fan of the internet. While it's a great tool and places like Tildes exist, I'd posit that a vast majority of the internet is less utility...

    I'd like to preface this with saying I'm not a super big fan of the internet. While it's a great tool and places like Tildes exist, I'd posit that a vast majority of the internet is less utility and more waste of mental space for most people. How much information does the typical web page for different types of content offer? How much do we intend to absorb? How much do we actually absorb? Most people say it is a decreasing trend, the web page offers (in ELI5 fashion) three informations, we try to absorb two, we generally only get one.

    I believe it's different now-a-days. The web page offers two, we intend to absorb one, but we end up with three informations. Modern internet journalism preys on our emotions, social media preys on our emotions. The authors of major internet outlets sensationalize everything. So we end up with:

    1. The information we are interested in.
    2. The superfluous information, often irrelevant, through content like advertisements, "related topics/articles/pages" and other people's comments (not always made in good faith or constructive).
    3. Our emotional reaction. This is something that while engineered by the content creators, only exists in our minds.

    Like any good book, we pick up the content and when we put it down we walk away with more to think about than what was originally written. Except, what do we do when this concept is detrimental to societal development and our own health?

    Then we think about the speed of information. What prompted this entire post for me was an article I was reading on CNN today, about the execution of Daniel Lewis Lee. This is not a man I have any sympathy for, I do not like him or any ideas he represented. A man convicted of killing three people and a self-proclaimed white supremacist was executed this morning.

    This morning.

    I got into town this morning and read the article, it had been posted 10 minutes prior.

    10 minutes.

    Mr. Lee was pronounced dead at 8:07AM ET. I read this article at about 6:30AM MT. Within 30 or so minutes of a man being killed for what the state claims is his crime, I was informed by an internet article. I am about 2000 miles away from where this man was killed.

    30 minutes.

    I have been off the internet for quite some time, so I'm getting back into the groove a little bit. This hit me like a truck, had this occurred 3 months ago I don't think I would have flinched. What kind of world do we live in, where a ubiquitous monstrosity called the internet can so easily desensitize us to the fact that a human being was just killed by the state for their crimes?

    I offer no sympathies for the man or his actions, I do not wish this to be a post about the death penalty but that is still a human being that was just killed. I argue not whether or not he should have been executed, I instead posit that our reactions as a society are a testament to how much empathy and humanity has been lost in the modern age. In the grand scheme of things, for everybody but the most intimately familiar and impacted people, this is just a headline. It will be forgotten in a few days, life will go on. I believe this is a direct consequence of the aforementioned information overload in association with emotionally driven content.

    Is this the world we created? Is this how we want to live? In this society where the loss of one is equal to the loss of none? Even the loss of a distant many is inconsequential in the modern, desensitized age. I believe we as a people are numbed by our own creations, and I honestly don't know what we can do about it.

    9 votes
  20. Have you ever been discriminated against because of a disability (specifically mental illness?)

    Hey gang! So it has been a minute! I alluded to my plan to venture off into the woods in prior posts but didn't go into too much detail. Any who, I'm back but not on my own accord. The reason I...

    Hey gang!

    So it has been a minute! I alluded to my plan to venture off into the woods in prior posts but didn't go into too much detail. Any who, I'm back but not on my own accord.

    The reason I ask this question is because it just happened to me. I've struggled with depression and anxiety for going on 15 years, I've talked to a lot of people about it, gotten help, and received a lot of support over the years. I have never had it blow back in my face like it just did. Super long story kind of short:

    • I want to offer some context here, that not more than a week prior, my organization had a "getting vulnerable" meeting whereby we were asked (but not required) to share some information about ourselves with our crews. Crews worked and lived together in remote back country settings for months at a time, to be honest it went pretty well. I did not open up too much at the time as I had just met everybody, but eventually I got more comfortable.
    • I told the wrong person at my work, my direct supervisor (I was in no danger at any point during my employment, this information was given in a contextual fashion. Because we work so closely together for weeks at a time and also live together, these types of things tend to come out.)
    • They told the wrong people (management).
    • I was talked to for 5 hours in a closed door meeting with the top brass of the organization (read: interrogated and asked to give a comprehensive psychological background, even though I had already given them a topical briefing during the hiring process.)
    • I was pulled out of the field for liability reasons (I openly objected to this, saying that said field was best for my mental health.)
    • I was placed on an "in-town" crew that I did not want to join (I openly objected to this as well.)
    • I tried to exist on the new crew, but found it immediately and chronically untenable. My new coworkers were OK people, but the stark contrast in personalities between my old and new crew was jarring. Given our line and nature of work, this is super important and there's no way top brass didn't know about this. I voiced this and once again requested to be placed back in the back country at a base camp, I was ignored.
    • My mental health began to catch up to me. I did not like my position in life or at work, having to live in the city which is something I came out here to entirely avoid was crushing any and all morale I tried to work up.
    • The writing was on the wall. I didn't like it there anymore, and my employer didn't seem to care (despite their claims) about where I was within the organization.
    • I voluntarily resigned due to mental health reasons rather than just walk out. The urge to entirely burn this bridge and emphatically explain to them why what they did was so improper was incredibly strong, but I decided not to. This organization is a big name in our field and the field isn't all that big, they stated that I'd be welcome back, I'd sooner clean a peanut butter covered shag carpet with my tongue.

    The general mood and sentiment during all of my conversations with staff members could be described as tense. The way in which I was treated during all of those meetings was as though I was a conglomeration of suicidal, homicidal and a direct threat to anybody near me. I could literally see their brains doing very careful dance numbers as they walked over what they thought were eggshells, when at no point was that the case in my view. Their actions, disguised as being motivated by empathy, came straight out of the Harvard Business School of Cover Your Ass. At one point they mentioned they had a psychologist on retainer that they were consulting. I have seen so many damn therapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, shrinks and every other name in the book over 15 years. I have never met one that would ever make any absolute statements or suggest any concrete actions before even meeting a patient. Their inability to even empathize with what I had been going through was apparent. At no point did they seem to consider the human in the room, it was always "we appreciate what you bring", "you are a good resource to have", and the worst of all "we hear you, but..." Holy fuck the lingering but was bad. "I'm not racist, but...", dude sit the fuck down.

    So that happened within a week or so. There's quite a few more details but I don't want to make the entire point of this post to rant (even though that's what it has turned into.) I am now jobless, homeless as housing was through my work, in an entirely new city to me and floating on savings. It's not too bad to be honest. This is not my first homeless (hobo, vagabond, rubber tramp) experience/adventure, I'm not financially comfortable (I'm on borrowed time) but I'm not broke and honestly I'm in a good place mentally. I've been camping in the woods and I've got everything I need to survive. I'm even super involved in a local activist group, if that's any testament to how comfortable I've become in my current position.

    So, does this sound familiar to anybody here? Have you been discriminated against in this fashion? How'd you react? Cope? Where did you go from there? I'd like to hear from others to simply know I'm not alone in this bullshit. I've been in support groups for mental health, and other reasons, but I've never realized the need for this subset of people to seek support. It's been 10 days now and I'm honestly still in shock.

    Feel free to get as vulnerable as you want, I won't tell your fucking inept boss.

    20 votes