23 votes

What are you reading these days? #13

What are you reading currently? Fiction or non-fiction, any genre, any language! Tell us what you're reading, and talk a bit about it.

Notes: I could not start the thread yesterday on Friday like I used to, I'm sorry for the delay.

Past weeks: Week #1 · Week #2 · Week #3 · Week #4 · Week #5 · Week #6 · Week #7 · Week #8 · Week #9 · Week #10 · Week #11 · Week #12

50 comments

  1. [4]
    Nashooo Link
    I'm going to start my journey into Discworld with Guards! Guards! this weekend.

    I'm going to start my journey into Discworld with Guards! Guards! this weekend.

    8 votes
    1. Triple_Soft Link Parent
      I just finished it and am a few chapters into Men at Arms. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

      I just finished it and am a few chapters into Men at Arms. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

      2 votes
  2. [5]
    Dunic Link
    I just started reading Infinte Jest at the behest of my roommate and coworker. I'm pretty pumped to get into it but it's a very daunting task. I've got some fresh notebooks as I was told notes are...

    I just started reading Infinte Jest at the behest of my roommate and coworker. I'm pretty pumped to get into it but it's a very daunting task. I've got some fresh notebooks as I was told notes are essentially required.

    8 votes
    1. [3]
      maybemabe Link Parent
      I have tried that book but I have to admit I have not finished it. Interestingly enough I keep remembering the parts that I have read from time to time. It is pretty unique. But I have to agree,...

      I have tried that book but I have to admit I have not finished it. Interestingly enough I keep remembering the parts that I have read from time to time. It is pretty unique. But I have to agree, it is daunting.

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        Dunic Link Parent
        Yeah, it's definitely an interesting read. The author writes very manically about a mostly relevant dystopian future (references things like a stylized social media obsession "putting on masks...

        Yeah, it's definitely an interesting read. The author writes very manically about a mostly relevant dystopian future (references things like a stylized social media obsession "putting on masks with their best faces" etc.) back in the 90s.

        The author actually ended up committing suicide due to his bleak relatively spot on theory as to what the future would become. Obviously I'm a little morbidly curious due to my own general disatisfaction with the modern world.

        So far it's been a chore, but very rewarding.

        1. maybemabe Link Parent
          Yeah, I am aware of the author. I discovered him through tennis. He has essays compilation on tennis and was well-known in the scene. I am sure if you stick to it, eventually it will be hard to...

          Yeah, I am aware of the author. I discovered him through tennis. He has essays compilation on tennis and was well-known in the scene.
          I am sure if you stick to it, eventually it will be hard to put down the book instead of it being a chore.

          1 vote
    2. DonQuixote Link Parent
      I'm not taking actual notes on it, which is probably why I'm on hiatus at the moment. But there is something about picking up where I left off a book and trying to settle into it, like putting on...

      I'm not taking actual notes on it, which is probably why I'm on hiatus at the moment. But there is something about picking up where I left off a book and trying to settle into it, like putting on an old coat at the beginning of autumn. Or in the case of Infinite Jest, spraying yourself down with Lemon Pledge.

      1 vote
  3. cadadr Link
    I dropped the Ishiguro book I was talking about last week. I just couldn't get into it, and it started dragging on for a few days. The story was not bad, from a few dozen pages I did read, nor the...

    I dropped the Ishiguro book I was talking about last week. I just couldn't get into it, and it started dragging on for a few days. The story was not bad, from a few dozen pages I did read, nor the style, but I just could not appreciate it so I moved on from it.

    I picked up two books this week, and finished a long read. I was studying from An Introduction to Language by Fromkin, Hyams, Rodman for the last two-three months, and last week I finished that. It took too long to finish, and that's part me procrastinating and part some life issues.

    So now this week I've started Language in Society by Suzanne Romaine, which is an introduction to sociolinguistics. I'm reading these linguistics book as a preparation for my upcoming attempt to get a master's in the field. This one is more specialised into the area I want to focus on initially, namely language contact and variation. It is a greatly praised book. I'm just at the beginning, reading the preface. I want to finish this rather switfly and move on to a text even more related, Language Contact by Sarah Thompson.

    The other book I took up is Il Fu Mattia Pascal by Luigi Pirandello. This will be the first narrative by Pirandello I'll read. It's been quite some while that it was getting dusty on my to-be-read shelf, so I'll use Wikipedia's help to talk about its plot:

    The protagonist, Mattia Pascal, finds that his promising youth has, through misfortune or misdeed, dissolved into a dreary dead-end job and a miserable marriage. His inheritance and the woman he loved are stolen from him by the same man, his eventual wife and mother-in-law badger him constantly, and his twin daughters, neglected by their mother, can provide him with joy only until an untimely death takes them. Death robs him even of his beloved mother.

    To escape, he decides one day to sneak off to Monte Carlo, where he encounters an amazing string of luck, acquiring a small fortune. While reading a newspaper on his return home, he discovers, to his immense shock and delight, that his wife and mother-in-law declared an unknown corpse to be his own. Faced with this sudden opportunity to start afresh, he first wanders about Europe, and finally settles down in Rome with an assumed identity. His character develops in unexpected, even admirable, ways. Yet one admirable act brings the protagonist a crisis, followed by additional crises that lead him to conclude that continuing with his plans will entail only misery for those he loves, precisely because his entire life, including the precious liberty he thought he had gained from his past, is now a lie. He ultimately decides to fake his own death and return to his original life. But even that proves difficult; his family and town have long since adjusted to his "death," and his own adjustment of character prompts him to have mercy on his now remarried wife. So the twice-dead Late Mattia Pascal reduces himself to a figure outside the mainstream of society, a walk-on part in his own life.

    One lovely thing with Italian books is that they have a big front matter, the one for this consisting of over thirty pages IIRC, including a compared chronology of the author's life and of the related world events in his lifetime, and a good foreword, followed by a bibliography. A copy of Ossi di Seppia I read before had upwards of a hundred pages of front matter, including a detailed scholarly critique of the text and the author, apart from what the Pirandello book has.

    7 votes
  4. [4]
    Fierre Link
    I started reading Dune a couple of days ago and I’ve been pretty engrossed over the past few days. The world and universe are so interesting and mysterious.

    I started reading Dune a couple of days ago and I’ve been pretty engrossed over the past few days. The world and universe are so interesting and mysterious.

    7 votes
    1. cfabbro (edited ) Link Parent
      Starting at God Emperor the series gets remarkably existential and deeply esoteric with a significant amount of navel gazing involved, and as a result many people recommend stopping after the...

      Starting at God Emperor the series gets remarkably existential and deeply esoteric with a significant amount of navel gazing involved, and as a result many people recommend stopping after the original trilogy (or even after the first book)... but I actually enjoy the series back half more than the front precisely because of the futuristic metaphysics. So if you keep going I would love to hear your thoughts on the latter books. :)

      The Brian Herbert books on the other hand, while I still enjoyed them as the pulp scifi space operas that they are, are objectively not great and the writing is rather juvenile... especially when compared to the brilliance of his father's work. However even so, IMO they are worth reading at least once, if only just for the glimpse you get into what might have been had Frank lived long enough to extend the universe as he had planned to.

      2 votes
    2. JakeTheDog Link Parent
      Yea I remember reading it only a few years ago (late twenties) and I was nearly upset that I've been so late to the game - it should be mandatory reading at a young age for anyone in an interest...

      Yea I remember reading it only a few years ago (late twenties) and I was nearly upset that I've been so late to the game - it should be mandatory reading at a young age for anyone in an interest in scifi. It feels like the universe is absolutely massive, and "realistic" in the sense that, at least to me, it could be history.
      I would also strongly suggest The Foundation series by Isaac Asimov, it too has an interesting and mysterious universe and the timeline spans multiple centuries (over the trilogy, which is still shorter than Dune, I think)

      2 votes
    3. WolfmansBrother Link Parent
      I also started reading it recently(well the audio book, which is amazing) with my girlfriend whose read it before. We've been listening to it before we go to bed at night and the story is so...

      I also started reading it recently(well the audio book, which is amazing) with my girlfriend whose read it before. We've been listening to it before we go to bed at night and the story is so enthralling kinda makes it hard to fall asleep!

      1 vote
  5. [4]
    markh Link
    I’ve got a few going at once right now. Your Money or Your Life by Vicki Robin Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy The Passage by Justin Cronin

    I’ve got a few going at once right now.

    • Your Money or Your Life by Vicki Robin
    • Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink
    • Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
    • The Passage by Justin Cronin
    5 votes
    1. [3]
      JakeTheDog Link Parent
      How do you manage 4 books at a time? I usually have only two on the go - a fiction and non-fiction, so that I always have an option depending on the mood. Like, how often and how much do you read...

      How do you manage 4 books at a time? I usually have only two on the go - a fiction and non-fiction, so that I always have an option depending on the mood.
      Like, how often and how much do you read in a sitting, do you keep notes, or are you just that skilled/gifted with comprehension (no need to be modest).

      1 vote
      1. [2]
        markh Link Parent
        I don’t really have a problem juggling non-fiction, so the first two are a non-issue. Blood Meridian is almost an educational experience - it is taking me a very long time to read. I’m re-reading...

        I don’t really have a problem juggling non-fiction, so the first two are a non-issue. Blood Meridian is almost an educational experience - it is taking me a very long time to read. I’m re-reading The Passage and it is on my phone, so I read that whenever I have a few spare minutes here and there. It’s a lot though. Probably too many at once.

        1. JakeTheDog Link Parent
          Yeah, do you figure your comprehension is still as good when you just do quick reads on your phone? Maybe better?

          Yeah, do you figure your comprehension is still as good when you just do quick reads on your phone? Maybe better?

  6. Staross Link
    Céline - Mort à crédit. I already read it 10 years ago but I didn't remember very well. It's quite different from le Voyage, less poetic, but very good nonetheless. It's mostly about Céline...

    Céline - Mort à crédit. I already read it 10 years ago but I didn't remember very well. It's quite different from le Voyage, less poetic, but very good nonetheless. It's mostly about Céline childhood and early adult life. Main theme is the lack of money. The style is extremely rich, dark, funny and feverish.

    5 votes
  7. Sen Link
    Remembrance of Earth’s Past series by Liu Cixin. Just finished the first book Three Body Problem and now a few pages into The Dark Forest. They're good, but I definitely think overhyped. Maybe...

    Remembrance of Earth’s Past series by Liu Cixin. Just finished the first book Three Body Problem and now a few pages into The Dark Forest.

    They're good, but I definitely think overhyped. Maybe it's just me, but I don't find it anywhere near as mind blowing or unique as the reviews seemed to say. I'm also surprised it won the Hugo considering it's not exactly unique as a sci fi (character realises video game is actually portraying real life).

    It's well written though, and is far from bad. I'm still keen to read it all through if only for the interesting writing style.

    5 votes
  8. [4]
    patience_limited Link
    I needed something light because it's been a dismal week on all fronts. So it's Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything. I'm a sucker for "how did they figure out the best...

    I needed something light because it's been a dismal week on all fronts.

    So it's Quackery:
    A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything
    .

    I'm a sucker for "how did they figure out the best answer" stories. This book is a compilation of proofs that blind faith and hucksterism never get you to proper answers at all.

    5 votes
    1. [3]
      cfabbro Link Parent
      Everything okay? :( p.s. Quackery looks like a fun read. In a similar vein, have you ever read Flim-Flam! by James Randi? It's quite dated now, but still a fun read. Encyclopedia of...

      it's been a dismal week on all fronts.

      Everything okay? :(

      p.s. Quackery looks like a fun read. In a similar vein, have you ever read Flim-Flam! by James Randi? It's quite dated now, but still a fun read. Encyclopedia of Claims/Frauds/Hoaxes is less dated and still fun but not quite as good, IMO.

      4 votes
      1. [2]
        patience_limited Link Parent
        One of the best things about Quackery so far is that it's got the intellectual humility to say, "people usually believed these things because they were desperate and didn't have the tools or...

        One of the best things about Quackery so far is that it's got the intellectual humility to say, "people usually believed these things because they were desperate and didn't have the tools or resources to learn better."

        I've never taken to James Randi or some of the other debunkers because there's an underlying theme of gloating about their superior insight.

        Oh, and the bad week? Still got an amazing family, and I shouldn't fail to acknowledge that. Mainly just trying to wrap my head around some messy career challenges.

        5 votes
        1. cfabbro (edited ) Link Parent
          Randi is quite acerbic and incredibly sarcastic/dry humoured which sometimes comes across as bitter, but I have never gotten the sense he is really gloating in any way (other than when he publicly...

          Randi is quite acerbic and incredibly sarcastic/dry humoured which sometimes comes across as bitter, but I have never gotten the sense he is really gloating in any way (other than when he publicly beats a "psychic" at their own game, e.g. James Hydrick). But he absolutely, undeniably does look down on both the purveyors of non-sense, as well as those that have gotten hoodwinked by it. I'm not a fan of the latter attitude, since as you said, it's usually just desperate people looking for some shred of hope to cling to that fall for that sort of stuff, but the former attitude I absolutely support since spiritualists, psychics and the like are complete scumbag, scam artists IMO... without exception.

          Still got an amazing family, and I shouldn't fail to acknowledge that.

          Ah, that's good to hear. My family has been a tremendous support for me over the years, too. I couldn't live without them. :)

          4 votes
  9. gyrozeppeli Link
    I posted in the books for 2019 thread the other day, but: Korea's Place in the Sun by Bruce Cummings. I picked it up last year but I read this off and on because it has quite a lot of information....

    I posted in the books for 2019 thread the other day, but:

    Korea's Place in the Sun by Bruce Cummings. I picked it up last year but I read this off and on because it has quite a lot of information.

    좋아하는 일을 하고 있다면 (If you are doing work that you like) – A pure Korean book, about ~220 pages, that I hope to finish by the end of this year. I can do about 1-2 pages in a few hours but I need to look up 70-80% of words usually.

    5 votes
  10. Triple_Soft Link
    Men at Arms - Terry Pratchett Vimes is quite the character. I love Pratchett's mix of cynicism and optimism. Hitch 22 - Christopher Hitchens Much sadder than I expected but I'm only 5 chapters in....

    Men at Arms - Terry Pratchett
    Vimes is quite the character. I love Pratchett's mix of cynicism and optimism.

    Hitch 22 - Christopher Hitchens
    Much sadder than I expected but I'm only 5 chapters in. It's incredible hearing it in his voice in the audiobook.

    The Boy who was Raised as a Dog - Bruce D. Perry
    A look into child abuse and the challenges of trying to help those children. It's heavy.

    5 votes
  11. iiv Link
    The last two weeks I've read; The Remains of The Day by Kazuo Ishiguro, whom I embarrassingly forgot was British, so I borrowed the Swedish translation from the library. I really enjoyed it, but I...

    The last two weeks I've read;

    The Remains of The Day by Kazuo Ishiguro, whom I embarrassingly forgot was British, so I borrowed the Swedish translation from the library. I really enjoyed it, but I think it'd have been better in it's original language. It made me think about loyalty and dignity, and had some really interesting pieces. SPOILER [The writing of an unreliable narrator was brilliant] END OF SPOILER

    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, which I read purely for general knowledge's sake. In my opinion it was pretty boring (except the last few pages), but interesting nonetheless. What frightened me most was that the government didn't even kill the dissenters. It actually was a perfect world.

    Oostende, de zomer van 1936: Irmgard Keun, Egon Erwin Kisch, Joseph Roth, Stefan Zweig aan de Belgische kust by Mark Schaevers, in it's Swedish translation. This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's a (semi)biography of the two Austrian authors Joseph Roth and Stefan Zweig. It's mostly about the summer they spent in Ostend 1936, together with other exiled Jewish authors. It is very interesting, and I can't do it any justice just by writing about it here. Read it! Yes, now!

    5 votes
  12. MeMeBebop Link
    The last three books I read were: Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks The first Culture book. My dad let me dig through his old collection of science fiction novels a while back and he had The...

    The last three books I read were:

    • Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks
      The first Culture book. My dad let me dig through his old collection of science fiction novels a while back and he had The Player of Games, and I liked it enough that I picked up Consider Phlebas when I came across it at the bookshop. I think it might be one of my favourite space opera settings.
    • The Word for World is Forest by Ursula le Guin
      Part of the Hainish Cycle. A peaceful apelike species called the Athsheans rebel against the humans exploiting them and their planet, but as a result they can't go back to being nonviolent.
    • Galapagos by Kurt Vonnegut
      Book I got from my dad's collection. Definitely among the strangest novels I've read. Human society collapses and the only survivors of the apocalypse are stranded on one of the Galapagos islands - over the next million years, they evolve into small-brained furry creatures.

    At the moment, I'm reading Count Zero by William Gibson. I bought the Neuromancer trilogy a while back but I only recently started into them. So far they're very good, but Gibson has a very dense-but-interesting-to-read style that can be hard to make sense of sometimes.

    5 votes
  13. [2]
    SUD0 Link
    Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution It's a nonfiction book about the early days of computing and talks a lot about the hacker ethic. I'm only 120 pages into and still reading about the...

    Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution

    It's a nonfiction book about the early days of computing and talks a lot about the hacker ethic. I'm only 120 pages into and still reading about the folks that were in MIT in the 60s.

    4 votes
    1. xyquadrat Link Parent
      Oh, that sounds interesting! I downloaded the first two chapters from Project Gutenberg, will definitely take a closer look. What is your opinion of the book so far?

      Oh, that sounds interesting! I downloaded the first two chapters from Project Gutenberg, will definitely take a closer look. What is your opinion of the book so far?

      2 votes
  14. [3]
    intuxikated Link
    I haven't read that much books except some novels in my native language, it was years back though. So I researched for less intense books written in simple language since I'm still learning...

    I haven't read that much books except some novels in my native language, it was years back though. So I researched for less intense books written in simple language since I'm still learning English and ended up with "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes. I just started it, I'm enjoying it so far. :)

    4 votes
    1. Chaotic_order Link Parent
      Usually in a new language, I start by reading thrillers (if you are into them that is). They are fast-paced to keep my attention while I navigate through the new language.

      Usually in a new language, I start by reading thrillers (if you are into them that is). They are fast-paced to keep my attention while I navigate through the new language.

      4 votes
    2. Algernon_Asimov Link Parent
      Are you reading the original short story or the expanded novel version? Either way, you should have tissues ready for the final chapter. Seriously. Everyone cries at the end of 'Flowers for...

      ended up with "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes. I just started it, I'm enjoying it so far. :)

      Are you reading the original short story or the expanded novel version?

      Either way, you should have tissues ready for the final chapter. Seriously. Everyone cries at the end of 'Flowers for Algernon'. It's one reason I don't read it often, even though it's my favourite story of all time.

      2 votes
  15. alyaza Link
    currently focusing on A Brief History of the Car Bomb, through which i offer up the story of a particularly ridiculous oil tanker bomb that the OAS attempted to detonate during the Algerian War in...

    currently focusing on A Brief History of the Car Bomb, through which i offer up the story of a particularly ridiculous oil tanker bomb that the OAS attempted to detonate during the Algerian War in hopes of starting a genuine race war:

    Two days later, the “colonels” [the OAS's middle leadership] again attempted to detonate all-out sectarian war, using the most apocalyptic device conceived in eight years of conflict. Deltas stole a 4000-gallon gasoline tanker, rigged it with plastic explosive, and then tried to push it off a mountain road above a poor Moslem bidonville; fortunately the vehicle’s wheels were snagged by the raised shoulder of the road and it blew up prematurely. Although 2 people died in the ensuing conflagration as burning gasoline raced through sewers and gullies, Le Monde estimated that 2000 to 3000 residents might have been burned to death if the tanker had fallen on their homes. (The Times’s Tanner was told by a French officer at the scene that three months earlier the Army had seized an OAS directive in which Salan himself outlined a plan for “setting fire to filling stations in the residential areas overlooking the city and having the burning gasoline flow down the streets on public buildings.”)

    very fun book to read, not so fun to actually imagine in practice!

    4 votes
  16. JakeTheDog Link
    I'm reading two: Mastery by Robert Greene - I'm rereading this one because I'll be graduating from grad school soon and this is a good reminder about the path to mastery. The first time I read it...

    I'm reading two:

    Mastery by Robert Greene - I'm rereading this one because I'll be graduating from grad school soon and this is a good reminder about the path to mastery. The first time I read it was when I just started, about 4.5 years ago. I also recently reread Advice to a Young Investigator by Santiago Ramón y Cajal, for the same reasons.

    TiHKAL by Alexander and Ann Shulgin - I just finished the prequel, PiKHAL over Christmas and it was an impressive read, in terms of the quality of content and writing. Not that I underestimated them, but it has been on my shelf for several years, bought it when I was more obsessed with psychedelics. It's a trove of quality information and stories from the very pioneers themselves.

    4 votes
  17. VOBOSHI Link
    I'm reading The Mastermind by Evan Ratliff. It's a really captivating story, right up my alley!

    I'm reading The Mastermind by Evan Ratliff. It's a really captivating story, right up my alley!

    3 votes
  18. [2]
    calyx Link
    Raymond E Feist - The Complete Riftwar Saga. Thoroughly enjoying it so far. Hard to believe it has taken me so long to get around to reading this.

    Raymond E Feist - The Complete Riftwar Saga. Thoroughly enjoying it so far. Hard to believe it has taken me so long to get around to reading this.

    3 votes
    1. cfabbro Link Parent
      Oh man, that brings back good memories. It's been soooo long since I last read that. <3 Pug. I should really go back and read Riftwar again some time, along with all the other Fantasy series from...

      Oh man, that brings back good memories. It's been soooo long since I last read that. <3 Pug.

      I should really go back and read Riftwar again some time, along with all the other Fantasy series from my youth (e.g. DragonLance, Belgariad/Malloreon, Dragonriders of Pern, Xanth, Forgotten Realms: Drizzt, Elminster, Pools, Harpers, etc., ) just to see if they live up to my memories. That could be a rabbit hole I never come back from though. :P

      3 votes
  19. madjo Link
    I just finished the Discworld novel Men at Arms. I'm going to start reading Nathan Lowell's By Darkness Forged next. It's the latest book in his Seeker Tales from the Golden Age of the Solar...

    I just finished the Discworld novel Men at Arms. I'm going to start reading Nathan Lowell's By Darkness Forged next. It's the latest book in his Seeker Tales from the Golden Age of the Solar Clipper-series.

    3 votes
  20. cartoonratlady Link
    I'm currently reading Boku no Hero Academia as far as manga goes, and re-reading The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini. I'm always down for new manga suggestions!

    I'm currently reading Boku no Hero Academia as far as manga goes, and re-reading The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini. I'm always down for new manga suggestions!

    2 votes
  21. maybemabe Link
    Better Web Typography by Matej Latin. All about typefaces and how to invite reader to the text on web. Huge fan.

    Better Web Typography by Matej Latin. All about typefaces and how to invite reader to the text on web. Huge fan.

    2 votes
  22. satan Link
    I am reading the sandman comics by Neil Gaiman. So far they are really entertaining. I'm not far into them yet but i enjoy them a lot.

    I am reading the sandman comics by Neil Gaiman. So far they are really entertaining. I'm not far into them yet but i enjoy them a lot.

    2 votes
  23. Ephemere Link
    I'm reading 'Public Enemies' by Bryan Burrough, having earlier in the year finished his 'Days of Rage' and 'Barbarians at the Gate'. He's a former WSJ reporter who now does a series of longer form...

    I'm reading 'Public Enemies' by Bryan Burrough, having earlier in the year finished his 'Days of Rage' and 'Barbarians at the Gate'. He's a former WSJ reporter who now does a series of longer form histories, with Public Enemies being about bank robbers in the 30s, and Days of Rage being about radical groups in the 70s.

    I think of the three so far, if you're at all interested in the Weather Underground or like minded groups, give 'Days of Rage' a go. The WU were essentially the first two chapters, and the remainder was about a host of groups I'd never heard of before.

    2 votes
  24. teaearlgraycold Link
    Game Engine Black Book: Doom by Fabien Sanglard. I read the first book on Wolfenstein a couple of months ago. The Doom book is equally good - I'd recommend either to someone who enjoys reading old...

    Game Engine Black Book: Doom by Fabien Sanglard. I read the first book on Wolfenstein a couple of months ago. The Doom book is equally good - I'd recommend either to someone who enjoys reading old C code and learning about 90's video game history.

    1 vote
  25. Chopincakes Link
    Just started Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami. I'm only 20 pages it and the only thing I can say so far is that it is definitely a Murakami book.

    Just started Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami. I'm only 20 pages it and the only thing I can say so far is that it is definitely a Murakami book.

    1 vote
  26. acdw Link
    I'm very nearly finished with Freedom Hospital, a graphic novel about a hospital for rebels in Syria. The art is very striking and hard to parse sometimes, but the book is good!

    I'm very nearly finished with Freedom Hospital, a graphic novel about a hospital for rebels in Syria. The art is very striking and hard to parse sometimes, but the book is good!

    1 vote
  27. 45930 Link
    Never been reading so much at the same time, but I'm currently reading: The Outsider - Stephen King, reading this with my girlfriend because usually our tastes don't overlap. The Way of Kings -...

    Never been reading so much at the same time, but I'm currently reading:

    The Outsider - Stephen King, reading this with my girlfriend because usually our tastes don't overlap.

    The Way of Kings - Brandon Sanderson, re-reading this on audible. I went on a long drive last weekend and started it and well.. you can't just not finish stormlight.

    Tao Te Ching - Lao Tzu, Another re-read. I just like to work my way through this once in a while to refocus myself.

    The Stephen King is my first thriller/mystery. I've only been reading as an adult for about a year and I've stuck to fantasy and "classic literature" so it's fun to see how my palette can expand from here!

    1 vote
  28. Matrim Link
    I just started The Foundation Series again. There were only 1 published edition from years ago, and they were really hard to find, even close to impossible to find in good condition. I think there...

    I just started The Foundation Series again. There were only 1 published edition from years ago, and they were really hard to find, even close to impossible to find in good condition. I think there were issues about the copyrigt with the daughter and the local publishers.

    Eventually, I could only read first 2 books many years ago. Well, recently the first 3 books published again, and they are planning to publish the rest of the series. And I must say, since they published all 3 books at the same time, it is obvious that they rushed the translation. The 3rd book is an absolute nightmare to read. I finished the first 2 books in almost a week. 3rd one I am still struggling. I think I am going to continue with the English versions after this point.

    But, I feel a great remorse about delaying reading these masterpieces. I read a lot of stories and short novels of Assimov before. But the Foundation is truly one of the best Sci-Fi series ever written.

    1 vote
  29. NeonHippy Link
    I'm reading Forever And Five Days, which is about the tragic case of the Alpine Manor nursing home murders. I have been into true crime since my late stepdad brought home several True Detective...

    I'm reading Forever And Five Days, which is about the tragic case of the Alpine Manor nursing home murders. I have been into true crime since my late stepdad brought home several True Detective magazines from a summer camp where he worked (this was the mid 80s), and I have a collection of more than 100 books now. I will start on The Psychopathic God Adolf Hitler next.

    1 vote