23 votes

What's your OS and how does it look?

Just a bit curious. Currently, mine looks like this. It runs Elementary OS, however considering hijacking it to Bedrock Linux, mainly to get cutting edge software from the AUR (for stuff like Firefox and GIMP) without losing all my data. I think I'll wait for Bedrock to go stable first, though.

It uses the ePapirus icon theme, which is just Papirus with better support for Elementary's UI. GTK theme is (if I remember correctly) Qogir and the Plank theme is the GTK one. What do yours look like?

51 comments

  1. hungariantoast
    (edited )
    Link
    I removed my Linux installation off of my desktop a few days ago, in preparation for a hardware upgrade and Gentoo install, so right now my only install that I can show off is my laptop, which...
    • Exemplary

    I removed my Linux installation off of my desktop a few days ago, in preparation for a hardware upgrade and Gentoo install, so right now my only install that I can show off is my laptop, which runs Arch and i3WM with a Gruvbox theme, specifically the "dark hard" variant, because it works well enough and the AUR is really nice to have, plus the documentation is great.

    Here is a simple screen shot, with Visual Studio Code open, editing my keymap file for my Planck, as well as a SSH session to my Pi-hole, running its chronometer script to get a basic summary of its recent activity.

    Here is the extension to get the Gruvbox themes on VSCode.

    In the top left terminal is a program called neofetch for displaying system information, with a smaller, more minimal bash script below it for similarly displaying a few bits of system info.

    The program running in the top right is gotop, an activity monitor.

    Aside from the Pi-hole, the programs in the bottom right are just bash scripts I picked up off the /r/unixporn subreddit. The "pipes" script can be found here.

    I also spend a lot of time editing OpenStreetMap on this laptop, which is a Dell Chromebook 13 by the way. It was $216 refurbished and has been my main laptop since 2016 if I remember correctly. I'm almost ready to upgrade to something better, as 4GB of RAM just doesn't cut it for me these days. Oh, and I almost forgot, the OpenStreetMap editor seen here is JOSM, although I specifically use the josm-svn package off of the Arch AUR, because building bleeding edge software daily on a dual core i3 processor is fun. (By the way, notice how I have htop sitting pretty at the bottom there? That's because memory is a precious resource, and JOSM likes to eat it.) Bonus points if you can tell me where it is that I am editing in the screenshot.

    If you can't tell by now, I like Gruvbox, so much that I edited @bauke's dracula theme for Tildes to fit my preference. Here's a (slightly dated) screenshot of the front page of Tildes with this theme, though this shot was captured on Windows.

    Speaking of windows, let's talk about the windows manager I use, i3. I chose i3 for this laptop because it was going to be my first time using a WM and I wanted something that was well documented and easy to configure and on top of that i3 also had all the features I wanted. Well, the stats don't lie, i3 is lightweight and great for my battery life. I've had KDE and Windows 10 on this laptop in the past and would normally get eight to ten hours of normal use, whereas Chrome OS could manage twelve to fourteen. With Arch and i3, I can regularly get sixteen hours of battery life with normal use, which is phenomenal, though I do keep the keyboard backlight off and the screen brightness down low.

    Also, in case you're wondering, I use exa to get the colored output you see in the screenshot above.

    Also, in case you're wondering x2, yes, that README....txt file is named that way on purpose in hopes that a ridiculously long filename and all capital letters will help me remember to read it. No, I have not read it, I do not remember what it contains.

    I especially love i3's tabbed mode, which is very useful when I want to have multiple programs on the same workspace, but only have one of them maximized at the same time, like when I am playing Dwarf Fortress.

    Okay, I don't actually play Dwarf Fortress on my laptop that much, because the game's performance can quickly become an issue, but i3's tabbing solution is fantastic for situations like that. Also, confession time. For any of you experienced Dwarf Fortress players, you might notice some funk with that screenshot above, which is because I wasn't actually the one who built that fortress, I used the df-ai program to automatically generate that world and build that fortress over a period of about twelve hours, because I've been testing new hardware I recently got, and just happened to have the save backed up on my laptop so I could take a bunch of screenshots of the game playing in i3.

    So that's all the screenshots I have to show for now. In case anyone is wondering, I use urxvt for my terminal, and scientifica for my font, which I absolutely adore and have no trouble reading at all. Oh, and I also use rofi instead of dmenu as my program launcher and ranger as my file manager. Web browser is Firefox Nightly.

    I'm sure there's stuff I am forgetting and if you have any questions, ask away!

    I seriously want to try out st and the other suckless software, like dwm maybe, but that's something to figure out after I install Gentoo on my desktop.

    If anyone has any recommendations for simple, minimal scripts, programs, or tools that I could use to enhance or replace certain parts of my setup, let me know. I would love to talk shop.

    EDIT:

    Here are a bunch of old, miscellaneous screenshots from the my earlier laptop setup, and the only screenshots I have of my now deleted KDE desktop setup:

    https://i.imgur.com/guXWITc.png
    https://i.imgur.com/jZhceZp.png
    https://i.imgur.com/EDWm8I1.png
    https://i.imgur.com/3txO1vG.png
    https://i.imgur.com/CdRo1cE.png
    https://i.imgur.com/qcNJz1O.png
    https://i.imgur.com/3hNjKGH.png
    https://i.imgur.com/k05JbrW.png
    https://i.imgur.com/rBgsQPj.png
    https://i.imgur.com/lFIQi4P.png
    https://i.imgur.com/hO9Vt9R.png

    10 votes
  2. tomf
    Link
    These are mine -- https://imgur.com/a/MUo3vst MacOS is my main. I use ChunkWM on my main workspace, and nothing on the others. ChunkWM is basically a less elegant i3, but it does work well when...

    These are mine -- https://imgur.com/a/MUo3vst

    MacOS is my main. I use ChunkWM on my main workspace, and nothing on the others. ChunkWM is basically a less elegant i3, but it does work well when you get it going. The configuration is a breeze.

    For my HTPC I use Windows10 LTSB with the CakeOS (with a modified uxtheme.dll)

    My Chromebook (with the mactac) runs Gallium, which is a tweaked Xubuntu. Battery life is excellent, and the hardware itself is pretty amazing for how cheap the laptop is (4gb ram, 16gb eMMC, 1080p 15" screen.) Everything is soldered, so you can't upgrade anything with this model, but the Toshiba CB2 that came out in 2015 can take an eMMC upgrade.

    On the Chromebook I'm running i3-gaps-next with XFCE with a custom Dracula-esque GTK theme. Props to @Bauke for turning me onto Dracula.

    I also run W10 LTSB and Xubuntu on my macbook pro, but the W10 is basically the same (only used for gaming), and Xubuntu is identical. The newer kernel supports the Magic Trackpad 2, which is one reason I finally installed it on this system.

    5 votes
  3. [3]
    meghan
    Link
    I use Windows10 Insider Edition with nothing on the taskbar except the start button and the time. I have a few desktop icons for programs but I seldom use them. Windows search is able to find me...

    I use Windows10 Insider Edition with nothing on the taskbar except the start button and the time. I have a few desktop icons for programs but I seldom use them. Windows search is able to find me anything in ~1-3 letters. I also use Firefox Nightly

    5 votes
  4. [4]
    apoctr
    Link
    [Warning: a lot of boring talk, probably. Screenshots of my setup at the bottom] My OS is now OpenBSD, and I must say it is much more pleasant than I had initially thought it would be, in terms of...

    [Warning: a lot of boring talk, probably. Screenshots of my setup at the bottom]

    My OS is now OpenBSD, and I must say it is much more pleasant than I had initially thought it would be, in terms of stability, cohesiveness and compatibility. However some things don't work on OpenBSD/work better on Linux (games) so I keep a Linux partition around.

    When I switched to OpenBSD it was an opportunity to try out the wms that came installed as part of the base system, namely cwm and fvwm. I know there are some lovely setups of both, but they are more involved than I had wanted, and in the end I switched to an entirely different wm - dwm.

    I like dwm for a few reasons. The first and foremost being that the base wm with no configuration "just werks" with regards to providing a working bar (that can be toggled easily) -- no need to set up polybar, lemonbar, or tint2 (the first not being easily available on OpenBSD). The second is dwm being dynamic, as I flip regularly between wanting to tile various things easily and wanting everything floating, which dwm makes work with no hassle. Finally I like that dwm has many available patches to change certain things, and even with my limited C knowledge I'm able to change the source to tweak dwm slightly to be exactly as I want it.

    The last thing I changed (ignoring minor changes like rofi to dmenu) was quite simple but also quite drastic: I changed my wallpaper to something less self-deprecating (spelling?). And as a result the Dracula colorscheme I used didn't really fit as well, so I switched to the Nord colorscheme for my wm and terminal.

    The bit people actually care somewhat about:

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      rnfn
      Link Parent
      Hi, I want to install OpenBSD as my desktop. Do you have any issues or tutorial I could follow to set it up as desktop?

      Hi, I want to install OpenBSD as my desktop. Do you have any issues or tutorial I could follow to set it up as desktop?

      3 votes
      1. apoctr
        Link Parent
        I think the official installation guide covers it quite well - the actual installation from the image is very simple provided you're going for a non-encrypted setup, mostly just pressing enter to...

        I think the official installation guide covers it quite well - the actual installation from the image is very simple provided you're going for a non-encrypted setup, mostly just pressing enter to accept the defaults. This guide from Roman Zolotarev covers an encrypted install and also some useful post-installation advice. Make sure to read the afterboot(8) manpage after..booting, as it contains useful information.

        The default install (assuming you install all sets, which I'd recommend) will leave you with an OpenBSD install with three available window managers installed: fvwm, cwm and twm (select which one the display manager boots into using .xsession). Alternatively you can install another window manager or desktop environment and use that.

        If there's anything else you'd like to know, ask and I'll elaborate/explain if I can :).

        3 votes
    2. yama
      Link Parent
      Did you configure dwm yourself, or are you using specific patches?

      Did you configure dwm yourself, or are you using specific patches?

      2 votes
  5. [3]
    crdpa
    Link
    Void Linux running bspwm. Here is how it looks now. I don't think the bar up there is cool as it is, but i can't think of anything better at the moment.

    Void Linux running bspwm.

    Here is how it looks now. I don't think the bar up there is cool as it is, but i can't think of anything better at the moment.

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      hereticalgorithm
      Link Parent
      How's it going so far, and how long did it take to get running? I'm considering running Void as a more transparent/minimalist/comprehensible daily driver.

      How's it going so far, and how long did it take to get running?

      I'm considering running Void as a more transparent/minimalist/comprehensible daily driver.

      2 votes
      1. crdpa
        Link Parent
        I've been using Void for more than a year so i have no problems with the distro. I came from Gentoo so it was a lot easier and faster to setup.

        I've been using Void for more than a year so i have no problems with the distro. I came from Gentoo so it was a lot easier and faster to setup.

        3 votes
  6. [10]
    tesseractcat
    Link
    Personally I use GalliumOS (on a chromebook, the Asus C302CA) and I'm pretty satisfied with it. I've always been a fan of MacOS, so I've configured XFCE to look like sortof like MacOS, except for...

    Personally I use GalliumOS (on a chromebook, the Asus C302CA) and I'm pretty satisfied with it. I've always been a fan of MacOS, so I've configured XFCE to look like sortof like MacOS, except for a few tweaks. These include a more Windows like titlebar (since that's what I'm used to), along with a dark theme.

    Screenshot 1
    Screenshot 2

    4 votes
    1. [6]
      kavi
      Link Parent
      i quite like it, apart from the fact the dock takes up a lot of vertical space. haven't heard of GalliumOS before, is is just a general purpose distro? and what's the dock + theme?

      i quite like it, apart from the fact the dock takes up a lot of vertical space. haven't heard of GalliumOS before, is is just a general purpose distro? and what's the dock + theme?

      3 votes
      1. tomf
        Link Parent
        Gallium is a modified Xubuntu -- mainly to include the proper drivers for the touchpad, keyboard layouts, and some other tweaks to work with lower-end systems. The battery life on my Toshiba...

        Gallium is a modified Xubuntu -- mainly to include the proper drivers for the touchpad, keyboard layouts, and some other tweaks to work with lower-end systems.

        The battery life on my Toshiba Chromebook2 is about 8-10hrs of actual use, which is pretty remarkable.

        Gallium is only for Chromebooks. You could use it with other systems, but there wouldn't be any point.

        4 votes
      2. [4]
        tesseractcat
        Link Parent
        Gallium OS is essentially just Ubuntu fine tuned for chromebooks, so it's main purpose is as a replacement os for devices that run chromeos by default. The dock is Plank, and the theme is included...

        Gallium OS is essentially just Ubuntu fine tuned for chromebooks, so it's main purpose is as a replacement os for devices that run chromeos by default. The dock is Plank, and the theme is included in the first screenshot in the screenfetch command.

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          kavi
          Link Parent
          Didn't notice. In what ways is it fine tuned?

          Didn't notice. In what ways is it fine tuned?

          2 votes
          1. [2]
            tesseractcat
            Link Parent
            Just stuff for compatibility and performance, I don't know the details.

            Just stuff for compatibility and performance, I don't know the details.

            2 votes
            1. kavi
              Link Parent
              Alright, thanks!

              Alright, thanks!

              1 vote
    2. tomf
      Link Parent
      Gallium is great! My album has my chromebook and my gallium layout -- https://imgur.com/a/MUo3vst Its surprising how much we can get out of these little Chromebooks. I've got the first Toshiba CB2...

      Gallium is great! My album has my chromebook and my gallium layout -- https://imgur.com/a/MUo3vst

      Its surprising how much we can get out of these little Chromebooks. I've got the first Toshiba CB2 (4gb ram, 1080p screen, but everything is soldered.)

      3 votes
    3. [2]
      Wulfsta
      Link Parent
      Oh cool, I'm using Arch on a C301SA! Did the C302CA models have the same keyboard/kernel issues that the C301SA had for a while?

      Oh cool, I'm using Arch on a C301SA! Did the C302CA models have the same keyboard/kernel issues that the C301SA had for a while?

      1 vote
      1. tesseractcat
        Link Parent
        I don't believe so, it does have some audio issues that haven't been completely resolved yet though.

        I don't believe so, it does have some audio issues that haven't been completely resolved yet though.

        1 vote
  7. [2]
    unknown user
    Link
    I am on elementaryOS since a week or so too. I used Debian for quite some time lately, and used Arch, Xubuntu and FreeBSD for long stretches of time in the past years. Except for XFCE, which I...

    I am on elementaryOS since a week or so too. I used Debian for quite some time lately, and used Arch, Xubuntu and FreeBSD for long stretches of time in the past years. Except for XFCE, which I used for about a year in total on Xubuntu and Debian, I would always use one of i3, dwm, twm, vtwm or xmonad with a custom X session.

    I am now trying out elementary because I like their well integrated, good looking, and rather simple OS. There are some problems, but it's quite obvious that lots of thought has been put into it.

    Looks-wise, I haven't changed anything, just use one of the included wallpapers. I will stay with this for a while and see if I can really adapt to it. If not, I think I will go back to Arch, because Debian Stable software is too stale, and Unstable is scary.

    4 votes
    1. kavi
      Link Parent
      I only really tried changing elementaryOS's settings to get a dark mode, because I like dark modes. Pantheon is pretty locked down by defaults, so I highly recommend installing Elementary Tweaks....

      I only really tried changing elementaryOS's settings to get a dark mode, because I like dark modes. Pantheon is pretty locked down by defaults, so I highly recommend installing Elementary Tweaks. I agree that stock Elementary does look very nice :)

      3 votes
  8. [4]
    biox
    Link
    Parabola + dwm on a librebooted Thinkpad (much Stallman!). I try to stick with the suckless philosophy (in more ways than computing) and generally I've been happy. It's not the prettiest but it's...

    Parabola + dwm on a librebooted Thinkpad (much Stallman!). I try to stick with the suckless philosophy (in more ways than computing) and generally I've been happy. It's not the prettiest but it's perfectly usable. Floated some windows and ran neofetch for some internet points.

    Linky: https://i.imgur.com/YIBMx4G.png

    Some of my suckless stuff: https://git.arkham.city/jesse/suckless

    I can upload other dotfiles if enough peoples care.

    3 votes
    1. [3]
      kavi
      Link Parent
      That's an interesting philosophy. It looks pretty nice, to be honest.

      That's an interesting philosophy. It looks pretty nice, to be honest.

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        biox
        Link Parent
        Thanks! I know the philosophy doc can come off as a little... elitist, bullheaded maybe - but the keeping things as simple as necessary thing really appeals to me, and helps me see waste and...

        Thanks! I know the philosophy doc can come off as a little... elitist, bullheaded maybe - but the keeping things as simple as necessary thing really appeals to me, and helps me see waste and eccentricity in my own computing (and life, more generally). Reminds me of minimalism (in terms of housekeeping)

        3 votes
        1. patience_limited
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          I'm going to second this - I've spent too much time on customizations over the years, only to kick everything down when I felt like trying a new OS. Some learning and wisdom gained in the process,...

          I'm going to second this - I've spent too much time on customizations over the years, only to kick everything down when I felt like trying a new OS.

          Some learning and wisdom gained in the process, but these days, I've got a herd of VMs that are tailored for specific operations and I don't have a great compulsion to make them perfect or beautiful at the expense of efficiency and reliability.

          3 votes
  9. [3]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. [2]
      kavi
      Link Parent
      Looks nice and clean. The Dracula theme looks really nice, I think I'll use the colour palette for Tildes. I can't find the cursor, got a link to it?

      Looks nice and clean. The Dracula theme looks really nice, I think I'll use the colour palette for Tildes. I can't find the cursor, got a link to it?

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        Comment deleted by author
        Link Parent
        1. kavi
          Link Parent
          Wow, those look nice. They look a bit like the Manjaro default cursors, I think I might swap mine to those.

          Wow, those look nice. They look a bit like the Manjaro default cursors, I think I might swap mine to those.

          2 votes
  10. Porpkork
    Link
    I currently use Debian 9 with KDE Plasma. Standard dark theme with the task manager on the left side of my screen.

    I currently use Debian 9 with KDE Plasma. Standard dark theme with the task manager on the left side of my screen.

    2 votes
  11. [8]
    Soptik
    Link
    I switched to Linux about half a year ago, and so far I'm using Ubuntu 18.10. However I consider getting new laptop in few months, and I'll use it as opportunity to install Arch Linux and...

    I switched to Linux about half a year ago, and so far I'm using Ubuntu 18.10. However I consider getting new laptop in few months, and I'll use it as opportunity to install Arch Linux and experiment a bit (I'd love to finally learn i3).

    It's largely unmodified, Adawita (Arc-Dark) theme with Papyrus icons.

    First screenshot

    Second screenshot

    Specs

    2 votes
    1. [7]
      kavi
      Link Parent
      That actually looks really good! Where's the wallpaper from?

      That actually looks really good! Where's the wallpaper from?

      1 vote
      1. [6]
        Soptik
        Link Parent
        Thanks! It's actually inspired by @bee (here). Here is the wallpaper, but I don't know the author, even google image search couldn't help.

        Thanks! It's actually inspired by @bee (here).

        Here is the wallpaper, but I don't know the author, even google image search couldn't help.

        3 votes
        1. whispersilk
          Link Parent
          It took some digging, but it looks like that wallpaper is the background of the Barbaroi Falls stage from the old fighting game Garou: Mark of the Wolves. Here it is animated.

          It took some digging, but it looks like that wallpaper is the background of the Barbaroi Falls stage from the old fighting game Garou: Mark of the Wolves. Here it is animated.

          3 votes
        2. [3]
          kavi
          Link Parent
          Thank you! Both @bee's and your desktop look really nice, I might just snag that wallpaper for myself :)

          Thank you! Both @bee's and your desktop look really nice, I might just snag that wallpaper for myself :)

          1 vote
        3. bee
          Link Parent
          Glad you got the Dash to Dock extension working properly, this looks great :) Here's my current desktop background for completeness: https://i.imgur.com/nR12rJs.png

          Glad you got the Dash to Dock extension working properly, this looks great :) Here's my current desktop background for completeness: https://i.imgur.com/nR12rJs.png

          1 vote
  12. [2]
    Diff
    (edited )
    Link
    I always drool over macOS's rounded corners and blurred transparency. I know you can pull that off with like Compiz-Reloaded or KDE Plasma but I'm too comfy on Debian Sid + GNOME to move. But I...

    I always drool over macOS's rounded corners and blurred transparency. I know you can pull that off with like Compiz-Reloaded or KDE Plasma but I'm too comfy on Debian Sid + GNOME to move. But I can still fake it pretty good with the Canta GTK theme and Blyr extension.

    And I stole eOS's super subtle rounded corners and made a significantly less subtle extension out of it. Which reminds me, I have a few things to touch up on it.

    2 votes
    1. kavi
      Link Parent
      That is gorgeous. I haven't got any blur on mine yet - but it's definitely on my bucket list.

      That is gorgeous. I haven't got any blur on mine yet - but it's definitely on my bucket list.

      2 votes
  13. [2]
    frostycakes
    Link
    Debian Sid with GNOME, the standard Arc/Papirus combo, and a few extensions (Dash to Dock and TopIcons are the only 'functional' extensions I add). It's been my standard setup for my Linux...

    Debian Sid with GNOME, the standard Arc/Papirus combo, and a few extensions (Dash to Dock and TopIcons are the only 'functional' extensions I add). It's been my standard setup for my Linux desktops for a few years now. I love some of the fancy desktops I see posted around here and on /r/unixporn, but not quite enough to change what's worked for me so far. :)

    2 votes
    1. kavi
      Link Parent
      Nice and straightforward - I like it!

      Nice and straightforward - I like it!

      1 vote
  14. nsa
    Link
    I'm on Fedora with mostly-stock GNOME Shell (just with EasyScreenCast, Extended Gestures, and Refresh WiFi connections). I have themed it though with Suru icons, Materia-dark-compact for the...

    I'm on Fedora with mostly-stock GNOME Shell (just with EasyScreenCast, Extended Gestures, and Refresh WiFi connections). I have themed it though with Suru icons, Materia-dark-compact for the shell, and Materia-light for the apps

    2 votes
  15. nutax
    Link
    I'm currently testing KDE on Antergos. The dock is Latte and the icons are numix-square.

    I'm currently testing KDE on Antergos. The dock is Latte and the icons are numix-square.

    2 votes
  16. lynxy
    Link
    I've just switched fully to an Arch installation (from dual-boot Windows 10 & Arch), after a slight kerfuffle with an undersized efi system partition, and I'm quite liking the result. Desktop with...

    I've just switched fully to an Arch installation (from dual-boot Windows 10 & Arch), after a slight kerfuffle with an undersized efi system partition, and I'm quite liking the result.

    Desktop with thunar & xfce4-terminal

    xfwm4 with typical thunar file manager, xfce4-terminal and a nord-theme found on github.

    I've disabled the panel in the session manager, as well as removing all but the default workspace, and am using a custom xfwm4 theme with a script I wrote myself for switching theme colours via the cli, loading presets from a themes file. GTK is using the Fantome theme, and I'm using the Arc icon pack.

    Wallpaper can be found here.

    Currently I use rofi as an application finder/launcher.

    2 votes
  17. Soptik
    Link
    I just installed i3-gaps on my computer and it looks so much better than before. Screenshot I've spent last few hours configuring it, and it is finallty complete - I'd love to have vscode slightly...

    I just installed i3-gaps on my computer and it looks so much better than before.

    Screenshot

    I've spent last few hours configuring it, and it is finallty complete - I'd love to have vscode slightly transparent, but I couldn't figure it out. But there is open merge request with transparency which looks great, so I hope we'll finally get transparency in official build.

    2 votes
  18. conor
    (edited )
    Link
    I'm using Arch Linux with i3wm. i3bar is populated using Conky. The current track is using spotify-now to pull track information from Spotify. I'm using st for my terminal for no reason other than...

    I'm using Arch Linux with i3wm.

    i3bar is populated using Conky. The current track is using spotify-now to pull track information from Spotify.

    I'm using st for my terminal for no reason other than it does exactly what I need to with no extra features I don't really use.

    In Firefox I'm using TreeStyleTabs with a modified UserChrome.css to clean up some UI elements, since I largely navigate via keyboard.

    My setup is far from "Linux rice", but it's functional and I like the minimalism of it all.

    I also have a second HDD with Debian-testing installed that I use for gaming running a very stock GNOME 3, so there's nothing interesting to see there. :)

    2 votes
  19. SleepyGary
    Link
    I have a Ubuntu 18 partition and a Windows 10 partition. Ubuntu the only OS customisation I've done is make the dock smaller. On Windows I've installed Classic Shell to get the Windows 7 style...

    I have a Ubuntu 18 partition and a Windows 10 partition. Ubuntu the only OS customisation I've done is make the dock smaller. On Windows I've installed Classic Shell to get the Windows 7 style start menu. I almost always have maximised windows, as such, I never see the desktop wallpaper so they are both whatever comes stock. I prefer my OSes get out of my way and let me work.

    1 vote
  20. Wren
    Link
    On my desktop, it's fairly standard KDE (anything complicated would require a good bit of tweaking as I fluctuate between 4 and 5 monitors) On my laptop, it's still unmodified Manjaro i3 since I...

    On my desktop, it's fairly standard KDE (anything complicated would require a good bit of tweaking as I fluctuate between 4 and 5 monitors)

    On my laptop, it's still unmodified Manjaro i3 since I only got it on Thursday.