15 votes

Turkey will now be known as Türkiye (at least at the UN)

23 comments

  1. [7]
    kwyjibo
    Link
    I'm surprised to see this here, because it barely made the news in Turkey. I'm Turkish and "Türkiye" is what the country is called in its native language since its inception. So there will be no...
    • Exemplary

    I'm surprised to see this here, because it barely made the news in Turkey.

    I'm Turkish and "Türkiye" is what the country is called in its native language since its inception. So there will be no difference for me when I speak Turkish. This is also not a "new name", because Turkey is what Türkiye is called in English and Erdoğan doesn't have the power to force new words into other languages. He can request the UN and other institutions Turkey's part of to use some other name he prefers for reasons that I can't comprehend1, but that doesn't mean I'm suddenly going to use Türkiye when I'm speaking in English for the same reason I don't use 日本 to refer Japan, or Deutschland for Germany.

    I'll continue to abide the lexicon of the language I'm using, instead of Erdoğan's whims.


    1: My guess would be he wants to leave another piece of his legacy behind in the international stage before he's on his way out.

    14 votes
    1. [2]
      bilbodwyer
      Link Parent
      agreed, although i don't think this is necessarily about forcing other languages to start using a new name, so much as just asserting a non-anglicised version of that name as their official...

      agreed, although i don't think this is necessarily about forcing other languages to start using a new name, so much as just asserting a non-anglicised version of that name as their official international name.

      depending on the common usage after a couple of years, i may change my mind on this tho. i do refer to Czechia rather than Czech Republic these days, for instance

      8 votes
      1. Akir
        Link Parent
        I can understand where calling them by their own self-given name is not possible due to the way a language works, but I've always thought it was extremely disrespectful to call other people's...

        I can understand where calling them by their own self-given name is not possible due to the way a language works, but I've always thought it was extremely disrespectful to call other people's countries different names.

        For some reason it particularly bothers me when the name gets 'translated', i.e how the United States of America becomes les États-Unis d'Amérique in French.

    2. [4]
      skybrian
      Link Parent
      Countries do often get their way in the end. Consider Peking/Beijing and Burma/Myanmar. And there is a famous song about Istanbul. :) It takes years and getting the UN to adopt the new name is the...

      Countries do often get their way in the end. Consider Peking/Beijing and Burma/Myanmar. And there is a famous song about Istanbul. :)

      It takes years and getting the UN to adopt the new name is the first step. I imagine diplomats would be the first to start using it and then newspapers will start.

      There's little reason for ordinary English speakers to be early adopters, though.

      6 votes
      1. [3]
        Grzmot
        Link Parent
        That's a weird way to say Constantinople!!!11

        And there is a famous song about Istanbul. :)

        That's a weird way to say Constantinople!!!11

        2 votes
        1. [2]
          Fal
          Link Parent
          Do you mean Byzantium?

          Do you mean Byzantium?

          1 vote
          1. Grzmot
            Link Parent
            I'm still a little sad that Byzantium is not a country anymore because I absolutely love how the word sounds and is written.

            I'm still a little sad that Byzantium is not a country anymore because I absolutely love how the word sounds and is written.

            2 votes
  2. [2]
    Greg
    Link
    I'm guessing it'll stick as a new generation comes of age who only knew it that way - which isn't that long in the context of a nation's history, I suppose. I remember in primary school in the 90s...

    I'm guessing it'll stick as a new generation comes of age who only knew it that way - which isn't that long in the context of a nation's history, I suppose.

    I remember in primary school in the 90s rolling my eyes at the ancient textbooks with the old imperial names for some countries, thinking how crazy it was that anyone could be so old fashioned as to use them, so I imagine kids of the 2020s will feel similar about this.

    5 votes
    1. th0mcat
      Link Parent
      Hell, I was still saying Kiev until the war happened and I saw the new spelling.

      Hell, I was still saying Kiev until the war happened and I saw the new spelling.

      3 votes
  3. [14]
    KapteinB
    Link
    Let's hear it, Tildeans; will you be using the old or the new name?

    Let's hear it, Tildeans; will you be using the old or the new name?

    2 votes
    1. [5]
      Liru
      Link Parent
      Standard keyboards with English language packs don't have an easy/memorable way of typing ü, so I'll at best half-ass it as "Turkiye". It doesn't really help that by typing this on a phone, it...

      Standard keyboards with English language packs don't have an easy/memorable way of typing ü, so I'll at best half-ass it as "Turkiye". It doesn't really help that by typing this on a phone, it autocorrected "Türkiye" and "Turkiye" to "Turkey".

      9 votes
      1. [4]
        onyxleopard
        Link Parent
        Recent macOS and iOS versions set to English language input methods can type ⟨ü⟩ quite easily (I just did it on my phone). You just long press ⟨u⟩ and you are presented with Latin script combined...

        Recent macOS and iOS versions set to English language input methods can type ⟨ü⟩ quite easily (I just did it on my phone). You just long press ⟨u⟩ and you are presented with Latin script combined forms appropriate for the letter you pressed. For en locales that will use these letter forms with very low frequency, I think this input system is flexible and intuitive (if a bit slow).

        You can see more on Apple’s support pages (screenshot).

        I’m not familiar enough with keyboard input methods on other OSs to know how you’d do it. Would you have to change your locale/language settings to get specific subsets of the Latin script to be available? I know you could always look up the Unicode code points for what you want and type the UTF8 hex escape sequences in a terminal, but that seems much more cumbersome.

        3 votes
        1. [3]
          Liru
          Link Parent
          Yeah, my Android phone has that as well. An actual, physical keyboard doesn't, though. Unless recent versions of Windows changed something, yes, you have to add in a specific language to make it...

          Recent macOS and iOS versions set to English language input methods can type ⟨ü⟩ quite easily (I just did it on my phone).

          Yeah, my Android phone has that as well. An actual, physical keyboard doesn't, though.

          I’m not familiar enough with keyboard input methods on other OSs to know how you’d do it. Would you have to change your locale/language settings to get specific subsets of the Latin script to be available?

          Unless recent versions of Windows changed something, yes, you have to add in a specific language to make it easier to type in it, which requires downloading and installing a language pack for some odd reason. Some have keyboard shortcuts that let you type the letters directly, such as Polish, and others have other ways to help type stuff.

          I know you could always look up the Unicode code points for what you want and type the UTF8 hex escape sequences in a terminal, but that seems much more cumbersome.

          Yeah, thus my "easy/memorable" qualifier. There's also holding down Alt and typing in the code for the specific letter if you don't want to do stuff in the terminal directly. (I remember having to write assignments in French in elementary school, where instead of using the standard keyboard shortcuts, most of us would manually type in the codes for the letters, ie. typing Alt+[1 3 0] to get é. I can't believe a lot of us didn't know an easier trick until high school.)

          2 votes
          1. DMBuce
            (edited )
            Link Parent
            I love how intuitive doing this with the Compose key is on Linux, and wish it was a feature baked into other OSes. I just did a quick search and it looks like there's an implementation for...

            I love how intuitive doing this with the Compose key is on Linux, and wish it was a feature baked into other OSes. I just did a quick search and it looks like there's an implementation for windows: https://github.com/SamHocevar/wincompose

            The way it works is, you set up a Compose key (mine is Right Alt) and then you can type it followed by several other characters to get a character that's not on your keyboard. For example, Compose followed by u then " gives me ü.

            a + ' = á

            o + A = Å

            c + , = ç

            R + O = ®

            c + | = ¢

            L + - = £

            C + = = €

            - + - + - = —

            Usually you can just guess which keys to type by the shape of the letter you're trying to make.

            4 votes
          2. skybrian
            Link Parent
            For characters that aren’t easily typed, I usually just do a search and then cut and paste. It’s rare enough for me that it’s not worth learning more efficient methods.

            For characters that aren’t easily typed, I usually just do a search and then cut and paste. It’s rare enough for me that it’s not worth learning more efficient methods.

            1 vote
    2. bub
      Link Parent
      I almost never have occasion to talk about Türkiye, in writing or otherwise. I will almost certainly forget that there's a new official name when I do find that occasion in a year or two. But...
      1. I almost never have occasion to talk about Turkey Türkiye, in writing or otherwise.
      2. I will almost certainly forget that there's a new official name when I do find that occasion in a year or two.

      But given the occasion and miraculously remembering that there's a new official name, then I probably will I guess? It will probably spawn a tangential conversation along the lines of "why did you spell Turkey that way" every time I do though.

      5 votes
    3. [5]
      Odysseus
      Link Parent
      Please don't call me a "Tildean". But for now, I think I'll probably stick with the old name. It's what people know and what people are familiar with. I don't feel like explaining to people that...

      Please don't call me a "Tildean".

      But for now, I think I'll probably stick with the old name. It's what people know and what people are familiar with. I don't feel like explaining to people that Turkey is now called Turkiye, even if I remember in the moment that they rebranded.

      2 votes
      1. [4]
        babypuncher
        Link Parent
        Is "Tilderino" more acceptable?

        Is "Tilderino" more acceptable?

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          TheRtRevKaiser
          Link Parent
          I liked "Tildo" myself the last time I saw folks discussing this, but for some reason nobody else was on board with that suggestion...

          I liked "Tildo" myself the last time I saw folks discussing this, but for some reason nobody else was on board with that suggestion...

          3 votes
          1. [2]
            balooga
            Link Parent
            I've enjoyed all the suggestions over the years but none have really stuck. Reading this topic about Turkey, my mind floated over to the way a person from there is called a Turk. And I wonder if a...

            I've enjoyed all the suggestions over the years but none have really stuck. Reading this topic about Turkey, my mind floated over to the way a person from there is called a Turk. And I wonder if a user of Tildes should just be called a Tild. I kinda like the brevity of that one. Pluralizing it is awkward though.

            1 vote
            1. MimicSquid
              Link Parent
              That's easy: the plural of tild should be tildes. The site is the people, after all.

              That's easy: the plural of tild should be tildes. The site is the people, after all.

    4. [2]
      babypuncher
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I have no clue how to pronounce the new one, and I can't even realistically type it on my keyboard. So I am just going to ignore it. Exonyms are common for a reason.

      I have no clue how to pronounce the new one, and I can't even realistically type it on my keyboard. So I am just going to ignore it. Exonyms are common for a reason.

      1. cmccabe
        Link Parent
        The article says it’s pronounced “turkey” followed by a YAY! My first reaction to the article was to wonder if this is an improvement.

        The article says it’s pronounced “turkey” followed by a YAY! My first reaction to the article was to wonder if this is an improvement.

        1 vote