14 votes

Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of July 13

This thread is posted weekly - please try to post relevant content in here, such as news, updates, opinion articles, etc. Especially significant updates may warrant a separate topic, but most should be posted here.

12 comments

  1. [3]
    MonkeyPants
    Link
    Police shoot Portland protester in head with impact weapon, causing severe injuries

    Police shoot Portland protester in head with impact weapon, causing severe injuries

    The incident places new scrutiny on federal involvement in policing protests in downtown Portland, where courts have restricted local police — but not federal agents — from using crowd control munitions against nonviolent protesters.

    8 votes
  2. [2]
    patience_limited
    (edited )
    Link
    So this popped up in my local feeds today: A Teenager Didn’t Do Her Online Schoolwork. So a Judge Sent Her to Juvenile Detention. While not specifically related to the Black Lives Matter protests,...

    So this popped up in my local feeds today:

    A Teenager Didn’t Do Her Online Schoolwork. So a Judge Sent Her to Juvenile Detention.

    While not specifically related to the Black Lives Matter protests, this episode neatly exemplifies what /u/dubteedub and /u/superjames describe.

    Theoretically liberal social and human services workers helped put a Black child in jail for failing to meet a remote learning school requirement that most students in a majority-white school were also struggling with. (Also, paging /u/kfwyre for expert input here.)

    I literally cannot imagine a white teen being treated so dismissively and punitively under the same circumstances. Michigan's Oakland County is notorious as a bastion of sub rosa racism, and its courts and acts of prosecutorial discretion reflect this.

    8 votes
    1. kfwyre
      Link Parent
      This is such a disheartening story, and its arc is unfortunately an all too common one. I don't have time at the moment to give this a comment of my usual length, and I mention that simply so my...

      This is such a disheartening story, and its arc is unfortunately an all too common one. I don't have time at the moment to give this a comment of my usual length, and I mention that simply so my shorter response doesn't accidentally imply that it's an undeserving subject. Instead, here's a quick scattershot of thoughts:

      Negative behaviors from kids of color are disproportionately punished. Even in cases where their misbehavior isn't escalated to the justice system, kids of color also often miss out on a "benefit of the doubt" commonly given to white students. Their behaviors will not be seen as mistakes, a natural part of development, or indicators of a need for support or intervention, but they will instead be pathologized or attributed to a sort of latent malicious "character" of the individual. White students' punishments often get portrayed as a "loss of opportunity" for the individual (c.f. Brock Turner), whereas punishment for kids of color often gets portrayed as "protecting society" from the student's behavior.

      This discrepancy is one of the key components of a larger issue called the school-to-prison pipeline, which is well worth looking into for anyone that's interested in one of the ways that systemic racism is embedded into education (to say nothing of others).

      This case also has another infuriating wrinkle: the student in question was identified as having a disability and was receiving special education services on account of that. School closures disproportionately impacted these students as well, given that each of them has been identified as needing services above what a school offers by default, so they both require and were cut off from even more support than everyone else. Furthermore, even if they were implemented remotely, these supports were often less effective than in-person ones (e.g. social groups for students with communication disabilities, which are far worse via Zoom than they are in person).

      So, not only did this student receive harsh punishment for something many, MANY other students struggled with (I saw a less than 50% completion rate with my remote assignments over the course of the closure, for the record), but this student was also among the most vulnerable to the negative effects of school closure on account of her documented special needs. Maddening.

      6 votes
  3. [4]
    super_james
    Link
    Interesting post - Blue Cities Blue Lives on MetaFilter about discrimination in Democrat held cities. Reminds me of a discussion I had on here a long time ago with u/dubteedub on the morality of...

    Interesting post - Blue Cities Blue Lives on MetaFilter about discrimination in Democrat held cities. Reminds me of a discussion I had on here a long time ago with u/dubteedub on the morality of putting your children first. I wondered if recent events had changed your view?

    4 votes
    1. [3]
      dubteedub
      Link Parent
      I am not sure what our discussion was precisely all that time ago, but I think the link you posted brings up a good argument. There is certainly a large group of white liberals who will talk about...

      I am not sure what our discussion was precisely all that time ago, but I think the link you posted brings up a good argument. There is certainly a large group of white liberals who will talk about the need for equality and how horrible racism is, but are unwilling to walk the walk in making differences in their own communities if it has even the slightest hint of negative consequences for them personally.

      The hypocrisy of some of these liberals that believe that racism can only come from Republicans and hicks in the South is pretty naive view when they themselves reinforce some of the systemic injustices in our society is shitty.

      I have seen this prominently among many progressives too, where attempts to address racial inequities are labeled as divisive "identity politics" and looked down on. Many progressive leaders seem to have a mistaken belief that if economic equality is attained, that systemic racial oppression or gender inequality or other injustices will be corrected.

      Ultimately, I think it is very important for Americans to learn black history and educate themselves on how our country has systematically oppressed black people for generations. It is not just slavery, but the era of Jim Crow, the KKK, policing, housing, education, justice, the list goes on and on. Those in power particularly should understand how the systems they reinforce are further enabling this oppression to this day and should work to fix these issues.

      One thing I came across recently was this poll test used in Louisiana back in the 1870s.

      https://i.imgur.com/73Wwurf.png

      Black people were given just 10 minutes to answer every single question in this insane document perfectly with just 20 seconds per answer. It is impossible and I challenge anyone to take a shot at this to see just one example.

      8 votes
      1. [2]
        moonbathers
        Link Parent
        This sort of thing is somewhat common in Madison. People take pride in the city's progressiveness and then get mad when BLM protestors block traffic as if traffic wasn't already awful a lot of the...

        This sort of thing is somewhat common in Madison. People take pride in the city's progressiveness and then get mad when BLM protestors block traffic as if traffic wasn't already awful a lot of the time. Never mind the segregation or the differences in quality of life and income between black and white people in the city.

        6 votes
        1. monarda
          Link Parent
          It's been the same here in Seattle for years, and why I stopped frequenting the Seattle subreddits.

          People take pride in the city's progressiveness and then get mad when BLM protestors block traffic

          It's been the same here in Seattle for years, and why I stopped frequenting the Seattle subreddits.

          6 votes
  4. spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    Mayor Durkan, Seattle police, and the undermining of civil liberties

    Mayor Durkan, Seattle police, and the undermining of civil liberties

    Since 2013, 20% of Seattle police’s new hires were military veterans. In that period, city documents reveal that the Seattle Police Department spent $60,372 sending Seattle police officials to Palestine. There, the city’s cops —including Best — learned counterinsurgency techniques from an Israeli military that received $3.8 billion in U.S. aid in 2019.

    2 votes