happimess's recent activity

  1. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
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    That hasn't been a problem for me so far.

    That hasn't been a problem for me so far.

  2. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
    Link Parent
    This has mostly been an exercise in consistency, so I deliberately kept my expectations modest. I'd like to add core and leg strengthening to this. I may do that Tues/Thurs/Sat, or maybe I'll tack...

    This has mostly been an exercise in consistency, so I deliberately kept my expectations modest.

    I'd like to add core and leg strengthening to this. I may do that Tues/Thurs/Sat, or maybe I'll tack it on to my M/W/F routine. All told the current work-out only takes me 10 minutes, and much of that is resting between sets.

  3. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
    Link Parent
    Yeah, the "controlled descent" is a big part of my pull-up. Initially, I could do maybe 2 pull ups, then I'd hop-and-lower-slowly for the rest of my sets. Now I can do 5 pull-ups with good form,...

    Yeah, the "controlled descent" is a big part of my pull-up. Initially, I could do maybe 2 pull ups, then I'd hop-and-lower-slowly for the rest of my sets. Now I can do 5 pull-ups with good form, taking 30 seconds rest between each one.

    The cool thing about starting out weak is that I can really feel the difference after such a short time.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
    Link Parent
    I do this routine on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. I also live a reasonably active life; this is just a strength-building program I've been working on.

    I do this routine on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

    I also live a reasonably active life; this is just a strength-building program I've been working on.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
    Link
    I've been doing push-ups and pull-ups regularly for a few months now. I do 5 sets of whatever I can manage, pushing myself to exhaustion on the last set. I'm getting stronger, my numbers are going...

    I've been doing push-ups and pull-ups regularly for a few months now. I do 5 sets of whatever I can manage, pushing myself to exhaustion on the last set.

    I'm getting stronger, my numbers are going up, and I've been really looking forward to it on my off days.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on Would you eat lab grown human meat? in ~talk

    happimess
    Link Parent
    In this case, you eat what you are.

    You are what you eat

    In this case, you eat what you are.

    7 votes
  7. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    happimess
    Link Parent
    When I'm interviewing a software candidate (especially one who is new or from an unconventional background) I'm mostly interested in seeing if they're smart, competent, and easy to work with. For...

    When I'm interviewing a software candidate (especially one who is new or from an unconventional background) I'm mostly interested in seeing if they're smart, competent, and easy to work with.

    For smart and competent, you'll need to show that you've done real work on a software project, and thought about the decisions and trade-offs you had to make in the process. Any of the projects you listed seem reasonable for this; it's more about how you build it and how you talk about it than about the actual app. Personally, I'd do Advent of Code (because it's fun and covers a lot of ground) and really devote myself to good practices. Taking 2019 for example, I'd write a solid 'intcode' library with unit tests and a clean API, and then reference it from all relevant problems. That's a solid medium-sized chunk of software engineering, and plenty of fodder for an hour-long technical interview.

    For easy to work with, you'll just have to demonstrate that you can cooperate and take criticism and explain ideas; there's lots that goes into it, but it will transfer well from whatever else you've been doing, unless you're a jerk.

    I'd caution you against doing cheapo freelance projects. First, you'll spend a lot of time doing client management, and unless you want to go into freelancing long-term that may not be a great use of your time. Second, you'll likely sign away rights to the code you've written, so when you start interviewing for other jobs you'll be have to talk about the project without showing any code.

    If you want to dive in to open source contributions, start by looking through a project's github issues; there's probably some low-hanging fruit in there that you could fix and get merged. A well-written bug report should also help you avoid the "how can I parse through thousands of lines to understand what's going on" paralysis that you correctly anticipate.

    glhf

    2 votes
  8. Comment on Terrible joke thread in ~talk

    happimess
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    Did you hear about the jurisprudence fetishist? He got off on a technicality.

    Did you hear about the jurisprudence fetishist?

    He got off on a technicality.

    18 votes
  9. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    happimess
    Link
    I finally hung some rings from a joist in my ceiling; it wasn't as difficult as I expected, and it feels more secure than I expected. I've been doing push-ups 3 times a week for a while now, and I...

    I finally hung some rings from a joist in my ceiling; it wasn't as difficult as I expected, and it feels more secure than I expected.

    I've been doing push-ups 3 times a week for a while now, and I think it will be easy to add some pull-ups to the routine.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on What are you doing this weekend? in ~talk

    happimess
    Link Parent
    I don't know how this didn't already occur to me, but yes I also need this for my spice rack.

    I don't know how this didn't already occur to me, but yes I also need this for my spice rack.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on What are you doing this weekend? in ~talk

    happimess
    Link Parent
    That's a rad idea. Go to a gallery, find something that matches your aesthetic, and grab a business card. You get help articulating your thoughts, and you're supporting working artists. I might do...

    I almost want to commission an artist to help me convert thoughts into designs

    That's a rad idea. Go to a gallery, find something that matches your aesthetic, and grab a business card. You get help articulating your thoughts, and you're supporting working artists.

    I might do this.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on What are you doing this weekend? in ~talk

    happimess
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    I'm going to build about 9 square meters of bookcase. Actually, I'm going to purchase and assemble about 9 square meters of bookcases from IKEA, bolt them to my wall, and then trim them so they...

    I'm going to build about 9 square meters of bookcase.

    Actually, I'm going to purchase and assemble about 9 square meters of bookcases from IKEA, bolt them to my wall, and then trim them so they look like they belong there. I haven't done any proper carpentry in quite a while, and it's been fun to plan it out. We'll see how it goes.

    My ultimate goal is to have a small light in each section of shelf, so that I can hold a book (rather, its ISBN) up to a camera, and a light will turn on, indicating which shelf the book belongs on. I can write the software no problem, but I've never done that much wiring.

    For now I'm going to get the shelves built, though.

    12 votes
  13. Comment on Are you a purist or evolutionist? What your language 'pet peeve' reveals about you in ~humanities

    happimess
    Link Parent
    I absolutely agree that it is a silly thing to get worked up over. All the same, I think it's more reasonable to interpret the phrase as meaning "he's giving 110% of what he's got" than "he's...

    In both these cases it's an issue of getting hung up on the precise semantics of a statement rather than trying to understand the idea being communicated by the statement.

    I absolutely agree that it is a silly thing to get worked up over.

    All the same, I think it's more reasonable to interpret the phrase as meaning "he's giving 110% of what he's got" than "he's giving 110% of accepted league-wide standard capacity."

    1 vote
  14. Comment on Are you a purist or evolutionist? What your language 'pet peeve' reveals about you in ~humanities

    happimess
    Link Parent
    "110%" Is a meaningful quantity, but it's impossible for someone to give more than 100% of what they have. If I manage to squeeze out a little extra performance, then I'm not giving 110%, rather...

    "110%" Is a meaningful quantity, but it's impossible for someone to give more than 100% of what they have. If I manage to squeeze out a little extra performance, then I'm not giving 110%, rather our estimation of my capacity was miscalibrated to begin with.

    Note: I'm all for colorful exaggeration. I just want to point out that the criticism makes mathematical sense.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Recommend me some podcasts! in ~talk

    happimess
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    I love The Anthropocene Reviewed, in which the host rates various facets of the world (e.g. pennies, Hawaiian pizza, cholera, tetris) on a five-star scale. It is interesting, funny, and sometimes...

    I love The Anthropocene Reviewed, in which the host rates various facets of the world (e.g. pennies, Hawaiian pizza, cholera, tetris) on a five-star scale. It is interesting, funny, and sometimes touching.

    I also listen to the first third of almost every episode of Futility Closet, in which the host reads a well-researched essay on some interesting historical event. The Boston Molasses Disaster is a favorite. The rest of the show is fine -- letters from the readers, then the hosts challenge each other with lateral thinking puzzles.

    I've just discovered The Darknet Diaries, which is very promising so far. Well-presented technical deep-dives into information security topics.

  16. Comment on How do you summon the muse? in ~creative

    happimess
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    I'm not an artist myself, but I've been enjoying listening to The Art of Process, which is about exactly this.

    I'm not an artist myself, but I've been enjoying listening to The Art of Process, which is about exactly this.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on Web developers - What is your stack? in ~comp

    happimess
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    I've been writing web applications for more than a decade, mostly on the back end. I've been paid to work with Java, Javascript, PHP, python, F#, and a couple of proprietary languages that...

    I've been writing web applications for more than a decade, mostly on the back end. I've been paid to work with Java, Javascript, PHP, python, F#, and a couple of proprietary languages that nobody's ever heard of (any Focus devs around here?).

    If PHP is working for you, then definitely stick with it and follow the advice already given in this thread. It's a good enough language, and lots of great software has been built with it.

    However, I was introduced to F# at my current job, and if you're looking to make a switch, I can't recommend it enough. We have lots of complex code and hundred-line functions (business logic gets crazy!), but it all looks something like list of objects |> filter |> transform |> transform |> filter |> wrap it in a bow. Once you get used to the style (and to be sure, coming from most other languages it looks weird), it's very easy to figure out what's going on in unfamiliar code.

    Also, the .NET core tooling[1] is now fairly mature and easy to work with on any OS. mkdir myProject; cd myProject; dotnet new mvc -lang F# creates a web application based on the fast, stable, well-documented .NET MVC framework. Access control, server-side rendering, swagger documentation, and all kinds of other stuff is easy to put together. You also get access to the .NET ecosystem, which includes solid libraries for basically anything you'd want to do.

    Take a peek at F# For Fun and Profit and the .NET Core Guide if you're interested. I love working with it.

    [1] Sadly, there's three separate runtimes: .NET, .NET core, and mono. That part can be frustrating, but I recommend .NET core. Pick one and stick with it.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on What is your plan for self-growth in the new year? in ~life

    happimess
    Link Parent
    If you love that about chess, you should seriously look at go. KGS is a good place to dip your toes in.

    stripped from all the unnecessary fluff

    If you love that about chess, you should seriously look at go. KGS is a good place to dip your toes in.