izik1's recent activity

  1. Comment on A Comment Is An Invitation For Refactoring in ~comp

    izik1
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    I find that I tend to write a few types of comments documentation comments I actually don't write these nearly as much as I should, so I'm bad at it, which makes me not want to write them, since...

    I find that I tend to write a few types of comments

    • documentation comments
      I actually don't write these nearly as much as I should, so I'm bad at it, which makes me not want to write them, since I'm bad at it. Nonetheless, documentation is important, and decreases the domain specific knowledge required to understand how something works.
      Note that here I'm defining "documentation" as something that lowers domain specificy.
    • bugfix comments
      While I don't always write these, when I do it's because whichever problem I had was very much non-trivial to figure out. Sometimes I'll split the bugfix- or maybe even code surrounding it- out into a function, but that's only if it even makes sense to split a function anyway.
    • todo/fixme comments
      While I do use issue trackers, I find it much easier to figure out where to do future work if there's already a todo comment there, typically I use both.

    I also find that I wouldn't recommend doing exactly what I'd do unless you're me. I tend to write my code for frequent re-reading as I often have to do that.
    I'm not worried about ruining my reading context by having to read another function because I've already read it. The name tells me what it does, I don't need to read it again (unless it's related to my problem.

    kinda offtopic, but I seem to initially read my code differently than a lot of people on this thread. I read the shape of a function, and then fill in the blur. I also don't really seem to have problems with "losing my reading context". Normally when I'm reading code for the first time in order to understand something, it's in order to understand a specific thing, so I read lazily (which works great even when I want to read in detail, since it often allows me to look at the full function before looking at what it calls)

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Electron is flash for the desktop in ~comp

    izik1
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    As someone who wrote a (proprietary, sorry) mobile app in Flutter, I can say that unless I was doing something really stupid(1) it was as fast as I would expect of a native app. It was even...

    As someone who wrote a (proprietary, sorry) mobile app in Flutter, I can say that unless I was doing something really stupid(1) it was as fast as I would expect of a native app. It was even passably fast in debug mode (which is JIT, with all the Debug stuff)

    1: This happened a few times, but, it was for clear reasons that were sometimes even linted for. Like, there were a few times when the code had Opacity(Text('...'), opacity: 0.5) or something when it really should've just changed the text color (Opacity is slow when it isn't 0 or 1, since at those levels it can just pretend to be its child or be an empty box the size of its child)

    Personally, I find Flutter to be a lot nicer than any other front-end framework in existence, but that isn't related to the above.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on What was your most memorable gaming moment? in ~games

    izik1
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    This reminds me of archon mode in Star Craft 2

    This reminds me of archon mode in Star Craft 2

    1 vote
  4. Comment on Voting on suggestions for the name of this group. in ~lgbt

    izik1
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    That sounds a lot like score/range voting, where you basically give everything a 0-9 number (which is the score, not a rank), you can give whatever value in the range to whatever you want....

    That sounds a lot like score/range voting, where you basically give everything a 0-9 number (which is the score, not a rank), you can give whatever value in the range to whatever you want. Admittedly, I'm biased towards using things of that nature.

    5 votes
  5. Comment on Poll: Most Texas voters believe business owners shouldn't be allowed to refuse service to LGBT people in ~lgbt

    izik1
    Link Parent
    No, I suppose it doesn't, it might matter if it was closer to 50%, or if there were more options.

    No, I suppose it doesn't, it might matter if it was closer to 50%, or if there were more options.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Poll: Most Texas voters believe business owners shouldn't be allowed to refuse service to LGBT people in ~lgbt

    izik1
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    TIL, thank you very much. (And thank you for not getting angry despite my utter density). This makes sense in a way that didn't quite click before (if a sample is completely random, and represents...

    TIL, thank you very much. (And thank you for not getting angry despite my utter density). This makes sense in a way that didn't quite click before (if a sample is completely random, and represents who one says it represents, then it's fair), I guess the main concern there is that most polls aren't completely random, there's typically a bit of selection bias in there (there are some people who don't respond to polls, for instance).

    Random offtopic thought: I suppose that a bigger sample size is better for precision, whereas the randomness & representation of it is for accuracy? (for instance, even a single completely random person, would be an accurate poll, but not a precise one. Whereas 1,000,000 people hand picked to give the same answer is really precise but not accurate.)

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Do you practice any form of meditation? in ~talk

    izik1
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    I've been doing TMI (The Mind Illuminated) for a while now (well, if I was consistent it would be for quite a while, but... I haven't been because of life stuff happening a lot recently) I don't...

    I've been doing TMI (The Mind Illuminated) for a while now (well, if I was consistent it would be for quite a while, but... I haven't been because of life stuff happening a lot recently)

    I don't really remember why I started, but it's evolved into me doing it because it's stable ground, and because I'm definitely more capable of diagnosing myself (knowing why I feel how I feel, knowing my own triggers for whichever emotions, etc)

    Do you study the philosophical, scientifical or religious aspects behind your practice?

    Nope~

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Poll: Most Texas voters believe business owners shouldn't be allowed to refuse service to LGBT people in ~lgbt

    izik1
    Link Parent
    Sorry, I should probably rephrase that to be "can be inaccurate".

    Sorry, I should probably rephrase that to be "can be inaccurate".

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Poll: Most Texas voters believe business owners shouldn't be allowed to refuse service to LGBT people in ~lgbt

    izik1
    (edited )
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    Just a reminder (based off of a quick skim of the article), the poll might be kind of inaccurate as it's only of 1160 people... Not only is it a fairly small sample, but this is also only of...

    Just a reminder (based off of a quick skim of the article), the poll might be kind of inaccurate as it's only of 1160 people... Not only is it a fairly small sample, but this is also only of people who respond to polls.

    All I mean by this is "take the information with a grain of salt."

    edit: poll might be inaccurate, it isn't definitely inaccurate

    2 votes
  10. Comment on What is your favourite programming language? in ~comp

    izik1
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    Ah, my job seems very keen to use the best tool for the job, even if that means I get to learn the tool on the job (thanks boss, not even joking, I'm very grateful for this). But I've learned both...

    Ah, my job seems very keen to use the best tool for the job, even if that means I get to learn the tool on the job (thanks boss, not even joking, I'm very grateful for this). But I've learned both Kotlin and more recently Dart (for flutter). Flutter is pretty nice for building once for Android/iOS/web for the most part and has other OS' in the works. But it's fairly young and I've had bugs with both Flutter itself and libraries using it before (not on stable, but on the other hand, I've needed to use something other than flutter stable in production).

    2 votes
  11. Comment on What is your favourite programming language? in ~comp

    izik1
    Link Parent
    Hey, if you like Java, you might also like Kotlin! Kotlin is similar to Java and also runs on the JVM. It's kind of similar to Java, but has learned from some of the pain points. It also has a...

    Hey, if you like Java, you might also like Kotlin! Kotlin is similar to Java and also runs on the JVM. It's kind of similar to Java, but has learned from some of the pain points. It also has a whole bunch of nifty stuff in it as well that makes it quite the joy to program in. (I keep finding myself missing when in other languages)

    5 votes
  12. Comment on What is your favourite programming language? in ~comp

    izik1
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    For me, it's most certainly Rust, and I'm not going to try to force anyone to like it, because it's not perfect, and also, that backfires. I actually like Rust for several reasons, method...

    For me, it's most certainly Rust, and I'm not going to try to force anyone to like it, because it's not perfect, and also, that backfires.

    I actually like Rust for several reasons, method chaining, an error story that actually lets you know what error states your program can enter into (looking at you Exceptions, not that I hate exceptions, they're better than some other options at least). and the whole "can't easily write a program that violates memory safety" thing. Going back to the states thing for a second, I like that I can move a lot of errors to compile time, where they might be runtime errors in other languages (Like guaranteeing that a UART controller doesn't accidentally set the wrong register, by using 2 different structs, that physically can't be created without the hardware being in the right state)

    For some reason, the following function is my favorite function, it isn't perfect (actually, it isn't even that great), but I smile every time I see it:

    pub fn ld(cpu: &mut Cpu, hw: &mut Hardware, dest: Reg, src: Reg) {
        match (dest, src) {
            (Reg::HL, Reg::HL) => halt(cpu, hw),
            (Reg::HL, src) => hw.write_cycle(cpu.regs.hl, cpu.regs.get_reg(src)),
            (dest, Reg::HL) => cpu.regs.set_reg(dest, hw.read_cycle(cpu.regs.hl)),
            (dest, src) => {
                let val = cpu.regs.get_reg(src);
                cpu.regs.set_reg(dest, val)
            }
        }
    }
    

    This function copies the contents of the src "register" to the dest "register" (except when they're both actually memory addresses, then it runs the halt instruction).

    11 votes
  13. Comment on Programming Sucks in ~tech

    izik1
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    Certainly, and I guess I'm pretty lucky, my work environment is pretty good, and I haven't even seen much bad cod- Actually, I just remembered this one person who keeps pushing to master in a...

    It makes you realize that a crappy work environment can make any profession terrible. It's definitely not specific to coding.

    Certainly, and I guess I'm pretty lucky, my work environment is pretty good, and I haven't even seen much bad cod- Actually, I just remembered this one person who keeps pushing to master in a groupish project (not school related, not sure what to call that) without reviewing, breaking stuff in the process. (Not work related though). Doesn't like making PRs/MRs because "they pollute the history" (and spam the bot channel in the Discord server). I guess my worst offender was (luckily) on code that I've never touched, nor will ever touch. Which was C++ but actually C (or C++ written like it was C, even though this is 2019, and they're using C++11)

    1 vote
  14. Comment on Programming Sucks in ~tech

    izik1
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    I think I disagree with this article, at least, in the way it's portraying it: This has not been the case for me. Now, I do know crazy programmers (they don't read this, but some of them might...

    I think I disagree with this article, at least, in the way it's portraying it:

    All programming teams are constructed by and of crazy people

    This has not been the case for me. Now, I do know crazy programmers (they don't read this, but some of them might know who they are). However, I don't think that a majority of programmers are crazy, and most certainly not in the "crazy requirements that don't actually matter" way. I personally think that that gets blown way out of proportion.

    All code is bad

    This is false as long as you or your dev team isn't swamped (and cares I guess), I personally haven't been swamped while working, and I actually spend an entire work day most weeks just cleaning code because maintenance is important to me.

    Every programmer starts out writing some perfect little snowflake like this. Then they’re told on Friday they need to have six hundred snowflakes written by Tuesday, so they cheat a bit here and there and maybe copy a few snowflakes and try to stick them together or they have to ask a coworker to work on one who melts it and then all the programmers’ snowflakes get dumped together in some inscrutable shape and somebody leans a Picasso on it because nobody wants to see the cat urine soaking into all your broken snowflakes melting in the light of day.

    Once again, I've personally never seen these unreasonable requirements. I know they exist, but they've never actually gotten to me, I've had deadlines, but nothing unreasonable.

    There’s a theory that you can cure this by following standards, except there are more “standards” than there are things computers can actually do, and these standards are all variously improved and maligned by the personal preferences of the people coding them

    I disagree with the second half, because once again, most code I've seen uses the standard of whatever language the code was written in, camelCase? Sure. UpperCamelCase? Sure. Tabs? Sure. Spaces? Sure. snake_case? sure. &str instead of String? Sure. Same line brackets? Sure. Newline brackets? Sure. And so on, most languages (with C++, C, Java, and JS being the biggest notable exceptions). Every single programming language I know has some standard style that you're expected to follow, with exceptions to said style only being allowed for a very good reason.

    For example, say you’re an average web developer. You’re familiar with a dozen programming languages, tons of helpful libraries, standards, protocols, what have you. You still have to learn more at the rate of about one a week, and remember to check the hundreds of things you know to see if they’ve been updated or broken and make sure they all still work together and that nobody fixed the bug in one of them that you exploited to do something you thought was really clever one weekend when you were drunk. You’re all up to date, so that’s cool, then everything breaks.

    Here I actually have to agree. Some dependency broke without any warning, at least twice in the past month. Which is really annoying honestly.

    You are an expert in all these technologies, and that’s a good thing, because that expertise let you spend only six hours figuring out what went wrong

    Okay, legitimate question time: Do you actually need to be an expert to find the cause of a bug in 6 hours? The worst bug I've had was due to one of the aforementioned dependency breakages. And really, the only reason it got so bad was because something that was supposed to be unreachable got reached. Took me 4 hours to find and permanently solve (now if/when the dependency breaks again, it'll only take a quick glance at the error log to see that something that wasn't supposed to be reachable got reached). This was in a language I've known for... 2.5-3 months? Not that the language really mattered, since it's similar enough to the other languages I know how to use.

    A lot of work is done on the internet and the internet is its own special hellscape

    While I agree that the internet can be very difficult to program for at times. I can't agree with the sentiment of things "constantly" breaking. Very often, yes, that happens when you have hundreds (thousands? bit tired) of people work on something.

    “Is that called arrayReverse?”
    “s/camel/_/”
    “Cool thanks.”
    Wasn’t that guy helpful?

    In the literal definition? Yes, that solved the other guy's problem. Talking in code has its useful points, like when you are trying to describe code. Code can be the best description for code if done right.

    Vast chains of abstract conditions and requirements have to be picked through to discover things like missing commas.

    Sounds like bad design, but compilers should be able to find missing commas fairly easily? Maybe I'm just spoiled by the compilers for Rust, Kotlin, Dart etc.

    The destructive impact on the brain is demonstrated by the programming languages people write. This is a program:

    I find it unfair to use code that's intentionally esoteric to drive home a point that programming sucks. It's like saying "programming sucks because people invented ways of making code that looks totally different from other ways of doing it." (not to mention that I'm pretty sure the BF and Ook implementations are literally the same thing, since Ook has the same instructions as BF).

    2 votes
  15. Comment on What is something that recently surprised you? in ~talk

    izik1
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    Fair enough, I just get kind of bothered that people think "this thing that I enjoy watching won't happen anymore, so lets not replace x with y" (where y is much better than x, keeping in mind...

    Fair enough, I just get kind of bothered that people think "this thing that I enjoy watching won't happen anymore, so lets not replace x with y" (where y is much better than x, keeping in mind that this is a conversation about the future, so even if y is worse than x right now, the hypothetical is that it's better)

  16. Comment on Fantasies of forced sex are common. Do they enable rape culture? in ~misc

    izik1
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    I think it's probably for the best that it left me confused then, since it probably succeeded and I just didn't/don't have the knowledge to properly form a solid opinion on. ninja edit: grammar...

    I think it's probably for the best that it left me confused then, since it probably succeeded and I just didn't/don't have the knowledge to properly form a solid opinion on.

    ninja edit: grammar because 22:43

    2 votes
  17. Comment on Fantasies of forced sex are common. Do they enable rape culture? in ~misc

    izik1
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    and another article down the knowledge hatch Thanks for linking, I don't really have much interest in debating the topic itself (as I seem to get unlucky with my conversation partners every time I...

    and another article down the knowledge hatch

    Thanks for linking, I don't really have much interest in debating the topic itself (as I seem to get unlucky with my conversation partners every time I give a world view), so uhh...:

    CMV (Change My View) moment: My world views did change slightly with this article (I never found CNC to be terrible per-se, but I feel slightly more open to its existence now)

    Honestly, I had a bit of trouble understanding the article, and where it was coming from, perhaps I'm trying to latch onto "the side the article chooses" and it isn't choosing one? Perhaps my comprehension isn't good enough.

    Today I actually looked up #metoo despite kind of already guessing at its meaning, so that's a thing I guess.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on What is something that recently surprised you? in ~talk

    izik1
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    As am I, sadly, I think we are still quite a ways away from this, and it isn't just because the cars aren't (quite) ready yet. Just about everyone I talk to doesn't want self driving cars, because...

    I am looking forward to a future where manual driving is illegal on city roads.

    As am I, sadly, I think we are still quite a ways away from this, and it isn't just because the cars aren't (quite) ready yet. Just about everyone I talk to doesn't want self driving cars, because "they're scary" or because "I want to be in control of the car" (this person has had bad experiences with other people driving, so... Fair). I think it will take quite a bit of effort to break through this barrier.

    Sidenote: Every single time I talk about something future-tech related, I seem to constantly have people tell me "But what about <entertainment thing that gets "obsoleted" by thing>" Such as (with self driving cars) "But what about racing?" Internally I'm thinking "riiiight, people are going to stop racing because of self driving cars..." Other times it's been "But I don't want to use technology" (IE: "I want to live on a farm ~100 years ago). Not sure if it's just the kind of people I tend to be around though.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on 4 words poetry challenge in ~creative

    izik1
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    no rhyme, no reason

    no rhyme, no reason

    2 votes
  20. Comment on Do you enjoy programming outside of work? in ~comp

    izik1
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    I program more outside of my job when I have one than at all when I don't. Not sure what that says about me.

    I program more outside of my job when I have one than at all when I don't. Not sure what that says about me.

    2 votes