updawg's recent activity

  1. Comment on Can European carmakers stop China’s electric behemoth BYD? in ~transport

    updawg
    Link Parent
    SAIC is also a state-owned company. Imagine how bad the cars are that are made by the companies that have to make a profit.

    SAIC is also a state-owned company. Imagine how bad the cars are that are made by the companies that have to make a profit.

  2. Comment on Elon Musk sues OpenAI, Sam Altman for breaching firm’s founding mission in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    How do you support claiming that GPT4 is an AGI?

    How do you support claiming that GPT4 is an AGI?

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Elon Musk sues OpenAI, Sam Altman for breaching firm’s founding mission in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Maybe this is loopholey enough that it's illegal, but it seems like the nonprofit could develop everything and the Corporation could be the one that releases the product Firefox. So everything on...

    Maybe this is loopholey enough that it's illegal, but it seems like the nonprofit could develop everything and the Corporation could be the one that releases the product Firefox. So everything on the backend is done by the Foundation while the Corporation packages it together as Firefox. It's all open source so anyone can make their own version. I don't see why that couldn't include the Corporation.

  4. Comment on What's the matter with men? They’re floundering at school and in the workplace. Some conservatives blame a crisis of masculinity, but the problems—and their solutions—are far more complex. in ~life.men

    updawg
    Link
    I shouldn't be so surprised that the gender wage gap, which has been largely attributed to women dropping out or decreasing their involvement in the work force, would be "solved" by men dropping...

    And so it’s chastening to realize that the substantial decline in the gender earnings gap is partly the result of stagnating wages for working men (which have not grown appreciably in the past half century, adjusting for inflation), and partly of the steady creep in the number of men who drop out of the labor force entirely.

    I shouldn't be so surprised that the gender wage gap, which has been largely attributed to women dropping out or decreasing their involvement in the work force, would be "solved" by men dropping out of the work force. That's not great.

    the conservative demographer and economist Nicholas Eberstadt points out that men are now employed at roughly the same rate as in 1940, back when America was still recovering from the Great Depression.

    This represents a side of the unemployment rate that often gets ignored. Unemployment goes down when people give up on trying to find a job. I don't know what the numbers were in 1940 or if this is cherry picking a year, but it is interesting that it may show where a conservative complaint--the current administration is making it so we don't have enough jobs even though the unemployment rate makes it look like we do--overlaps with "woke" critical theory--what are the underlying reasons and historical causes of this problem?--as men become a more valid subject of "traditional" critical theory.

    Reeves offers a wide menu of policies designed to foster a “prosocial masculinity for a postfeminist world.” He would encourage more men to become nurses and teachers, expand paid leave, and create a thousand more vocational high schools. His signature idea, though, is to “redshirt” boys and give them all, by default, an extra year of kindergarten. The aim is to compensate for their slower rates of adolescent brain development, particularly in the prefrontal cortex, which controls decision-making.

    I also think this is an interesting idea in the context of (the quickly disappearing) adolescent relationships. Everyone knows the sentiments like "s(he) be(lie)ve(d);" I'm curious how these sorts of power dynamics would be the new default for romantic partners having boys be a year older than girls.

    8 votes
  5. Comment on Weekly Israel-Hamas war megathread - week of February 26 in ~news

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Is it? Is knowing that you may never be able to hold a fulfilling, well-paying job again really that good? Especially if you are depressed, etc, being dead is much better than resigning yourself...

    Is it? Is knowing that you may never be able to hold a fulfilling, well-paying job again really that good? Especially if you are depressed, etc, being dead is much better than resigning yourself to a life of homelessness, etc. Normally I wouldn't comment something like this on a comment that's a couple days old, but in this case, it's a point of empathy that people need to understand. The military is always told "go to mental health! It won't affect your career! And if it does, it's better to be unemployed than dead!" To someone who truly is in that situation, there's a good chance that they see being dead as preferable to unemployment and all the extra difficulty that will come from that. If depression is that bad when you have a well-paying job, being depressed without a job at all will be hell.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on FastSDXL.AI: Free demo that lets you generate AI images as fast as you can type in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Try it again. It somehow works for me now.

    Try it again. It somehow works for me now.

  7. Comment on FastSDXL.AI: Free demo that lets you generate AI images as fast as you can type in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Works for me now 🤷

    Works for me now 🤷

  8. Comment on Happy Leap Day in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    I got the year wrong by 1 but 46 BC did have differemt length months in preparation for the introduction of the Julian calendar. That doesn't affect 46 BC in the Gregorian calendar, though.

    I got the year wrong by 1 but 46 BC did have differemt length months in preparation for the introduction of the Julian calendar. That doesn't affect 46 BC in the Gregorian calendar, though.

    Julius Caesar added Mercedonius (23 days) and two other intercalary months (33 and 34 days respectively) to the 355-day lunar year, to recalibrate the calendar in preparation for his calendar reform, which went into effect in 45 BC.[1][2][3] This year therefore had 445 days, and was nicknamed the annus confusionis ("year of confusion") and serves as the longest recorded calendar year in human history.[4] The actual planetary orbit-year remained the same.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Weird Wings: The M-21, an A-12 (SR-71 Blackbird predecessor) modified to launch a drone for recon missions over China in the 60s in ~engineering

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Where they currently have it, it's not very noteworthy. Just looks like some weird missile (which is essentially what it is) under the Blackbird's wing. I'm not sure where it was back then, but...

    Where they currently have it, it's not very noteworthy. Just looks like some weird missile (which is essentially what it is) under the Blackbird's wing. I'm not sure where it was back then, but all the pictures of it at the museum seem to have it out if the main collection, so that may be why.

  10. Comment on FastSDXL.AI: Free demo that lets you generate AI images as fast as you can type in ~tech

  11. Comment on Happy Leap Day in ~tech

    updawg
    Link
    Falsehoods There are always 24 hours in a day. February is always 28 days long. Months have either 28, 29, 30, or 31 days. The day before Saturday is always Friday. GMT and UTC are the same...

    Falsehoods

    • There are always 24 hours in a day.
    • February is always 28 days long.
    • Months have either 28, 29, 30, or 31 days.
    • The day before Saturday is always Friday.
    • GMT and UTC are the same timezone.
    • Any 24-hour period will always begin and end in the same day (or week, or month).
    • The difference between two timestamps is an accurate measure of the time that elapsed between them.
    • Daylight saving time always adjusts by an hour.
    • Time always goes forwards.

    Some of these are obvious, others I'm curious when they would not be true (when does a month not have 28-31 days? 45 BC in the Julian calendar?).

    7 votes
  12. Comment on White House urges use of type safe and memory safe programming languages and hardware (PDF) in ~tech

  13. Comment on What watch do you wear daily? in ~hobbies

    updawg
    Link
    Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 since December 2021 (even though I now have a Pixel phone). I also have a Garmin Forerunner 55 that I bought last summer for more accuracy when tracking runs and because my...

    Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 since December 2021 (even though I now have a Pixel phone). I also have a Garmin Forerunner 55 that I bought last summer for more accuracy when tracking runs and because my regular smartwatch's battery can't really deal with marathons and longer runs, so I would have to charge it too much after training runs. Both watches are not amazing and aren't bad. They're just watches that do what I want. I would never buy a luxury watch.

    5 votes
  14. Comment on White House urges use of type safe and memory safe programming languages and hardware (PDF) in ~tech

    updawg
    Link Parent
    I think there will be a lot of this. Rust is probably the first language that comes to mind for a lot of people when they see this, and I doubt many people will see this who don't know about Rust....

    I think there will be a lot of this. Rust is probably the first language that comes to mind for a lot of people when they see this, and I doubt many people will see this who don't know about Rust. This document will likely increase adoption of Rust, but I doubt it will be much faster than if it hadn't mentioned Rust explicitly.

    8 votes
  15. Comment on White House urges use of type safe and memory safe programming languages and hardware (PDF) in ~tech

    updawg
    Link
    Abstract:

    Abstract:

    President Biden’s National Cybersecurity Strategy outlines two fundamental shifts: the need to both rebalance the responsibility to defend cyberspace and realign incentives to favor long-term cybersecurity investments. In this report, the case is made that the technical community is well-positioned to drive progress on both strategic goals. First, in order to reduce memory safety vulnerabilities at scale, creators of software and hardware can better secure the building blocks of cyberspace. This report focuses on the programming language as a primary building block, and explores hardware architecture and formal methods as complementary approaches to achieve similar outcomes. Second, in order to establish accurate cybersecurity quality metrics, advances can be made to address the hard and complex research problem of software measurability. This report explores how such metrics can shift market forces to improve cybersecurity quality across the ecosystem.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    updawg
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Wow, I didn't think anyone would actually read that! Thank you! Even during the race I was thinking about if it felt like a great accomplishment because I hear about people saying races were the...

    Wow, I didn't think anyone would actually read that! Thank you! Even during the race I was thinking about if it felt like a great accomplishment because I hear about people saying races were the hardest things they've ever done. I know intellectually that it's technically an accomplishment, but I barely felt like I even had a choice to do anything but keep moving, so it doesn't exactly feel like an accomplishment. But it's definitely not like my marathon that I ran, which ended up just feeling like yet another long run and was actually very anticlimactic.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Tiny little mobile feature request: dot indicator in ~tildes

    updawg
    Link Parent
    Kinda late to write "inb4" when you're the sixth one (including one deleted comment).

    Kinda late to write "inb4" when you're the sixth one (including one deleted comment).

    1 vote
  18. Comment on Would a fairy or a walrus surprise you more if you found it on your doorstep? in ~talk

    updawg
    Link Parent
    I'm sorry but I think you are just using the wrong word here, which is very problematic in such an important hypothetical scenario. It seems that you would be more startled by the walrus, but you...

    I'm sorry but I think you are just using the wrong word here, which is very problematic in such an important hypothetical scenario. It seems that you would be more startled by the walrus, but you would be more surprised by the fairy.

    11 votes
  19. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    updawg
    Link Parent
    But wait--there's more! I drove to my hotel, hoping that I would be able to get in the hot tub or maybe eat a few calories. I got out of my car, with my mettle steeled for the impending shower...
    But wait--there's more!

    I drove to my hotel, hoping that I would be able to get in the hot tub or maybe eat a few calories. I got out of my car, with my mettle steeled for the impending shower that I would have to take--standing on legs that had just moved me 34 miles--if I wanted to get in the hot tub.

    As I was walking across the parking lot, I dropped something I was carrying--maybe a bandage or rubbing alcohol wipe--and stopped to pick it up.

    Unfortunately, I had to stand there in the middle of the parking lot next to the item I dropped for a couple minutes because my left leg completely cramped up. And I mean it when I say completely. I was standing there with my left leg totally locked in place. Completely immobilized--no mobility and no motility whatsoever. My right leg started shaking because of how long I was stuck balancing on it.

    Hoping that I wouldn't fall over in the middle of the parking lot (that would have been annoying to have to explain that yes, I was totally okay, just completely insane and facing the consequences of my actions), I finally felt my left leg beginning to relax. Which was great, because right as I started to move, my right leg cramped up just like my left leg had.

    Realizing that maybe I should stop doing what was causing my legs to cramp, I walked in a half-squat over to a little guard rail and sat down. That was a good way to relax my legs for a mo' while waited for them to stop feeling like they were about to seize up literally any moment (they were still about to seize up any moment, just not literally any moment), and then I got up and was actually able to bend down and pick up whatever I had dropped! I headed into my hotel room, pulled off my shoes, incidentally flung sand all over as I tugged off my socks, and lay down on the bed. My buddy from the end of the ultra had recommended I lie on my bed and put my feet up on the wall to help me recover. So I put my legs up.

    Uh oh!

    Cramp time!

    Luckily, when you're lying on the bed and are anticipating cramps, it's pretty easy to roll into a position that prevents them from getting too bad.

    So I probably spent the next hour lying on the bed, shifting from position to position to prevent cramps.

    Eventually I got up to shower, needing to hunch like an old man as I walked to the shower until I was eventually slowly able to extend my limbs while under the hot water. But that was the end of my cramping troubles!

    All that was left after that was literal starvation while my body also told me that food was bad and not something I should actually put in my mouth (thank God for bite-sized food and pre-chilled 2L bottles of soda at pizza places), as well as wondering how I spent about half of the race looking forward to the next porta potty, only to not need (be capable) to poop until the next morning...if not the one after that...

    ...I'll be arriving at home soon and I'm looking forward to eating some fiber!

    5 votes