17 votes

What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them?

What have you been playing lately? Discussion about video games and board games are both welcome. Please don't just make a list of titles, give some thoughts about the game(s) as well.

27 comments

  1. MimicSquid
    Link
    Playing Red Dead Redemption 2, finally. It's good stuff. The keyboard control choices are questionable, but aside from that I'm enjoying the game. I do have a few quibbles around the morality...

    Playing Red Dead Redemption 2, finally. It's good stuff. The keyboard control choices are questionable, but aside from that I'm enjoying the game.

    I do have a few quibbles around the morality system, but it's more eye-rolling than infuriating, and has minimal effect on the gameplay.

    It seems like the slow pace of most of the gameplay is divisive, but I really like it. It makes these places and actions feel more grounded in the world. As compared to C2077, this world feels real down in its bones.

    10 votes
  2. Icarus
    Link
    Noita This is a roguelike game where you are a wizard who ventures into a procedurally generated dungeon with the aim of surviving, finding better wands with ideal stats and spells, and finding...

    Noita

    This is a roguelike game where you are a wizard who ventures into a procedurally generated dungeon with the aim of surviving, finding better wands with ideal stats and spells, and finding potions. It is incredibly addictive, and gives me that feeling in Terraria of exploring caves and mines, without all the mining. You start off with two wands each run, one for general shooting and another that contains explosives. You are also given a potion that may be water or something that provides a buff/debuff.

    As you progress through the mines/dungeons, you can interact with the environment. Explosives will punch holes in the earth and through wood, allowing you to access hidden parts of the level that contains a wand, potion, or power-up. Explosives also set wood on fire, as well as pools of oil. This adds to the trickiness of the game, as enemies drop gold nuggets that fade after a few seconds. You often have to make choices of whether you want to risk getting set on fire from burning wood or oil and getting gold from defeated enemies, or progressing further down into the mines.

    The game is split into levels, where you progress by getting to the bottom of the level and going through a portal. You are then teleported to a place that is safe 90% of the time where you can heal, purchase wands or spells, edit your wand loadouts, and get a perk.

    With all that said, the game is amazing. I have left it running pretty much non-stop over the past three days, but I have invested at least 12+ hours over a three day period. I love destroying the environment. I love setting traps. I love finding cool wands and figuring out ways to utilize potions with my run. There are often times where I am playing and pull off some cool explosions that net me 100+ gold.

    But the game also makes me mutter things like,

    "But I was having fun :("

    "Why didn't I just leave to the next level?"

    "What the FUCK was that?"

    It's a great game, and well worth the $15 sale price right now.

    10 votes
  3. jrib
    Link
    Hollowknight pulled me in. As someone that hasn't really been able to really get into a game since I was younger, it was great. On the plus side, it has an ending so even if you get hooked, you...

    Hollowknight pulled me in. As someone that hasn't really been able to really get into a game since I was younger, it was great. On the plus side, it has an ending so even if you get hooked, you won't be hooked for too long.

    8 votes
  4. daturkel
    Link
    Just got Disco Elysium and I've already sunk about 8 hours into it. It's quite good: the gameplay superficially consists of having conversations and discovering things to pick up or do, but that...

    Just got Disco Elysium and I've already sunk about 8 hours into it. It's quite good: the gameplay superficially consists of having conversations and discovering things to pick up or do, but that doesn't do it justice. The story is good (so far), but the writing itself is fantastic—it has to be, because you're reading a lot of text. Think of a grittier (but still quite funny) Grim Fandango. There's a "Final Cut" update coming in March but I don't regret buying it now because I see myself replaying this at least once—you can tell even in your first playthrough how nonlinear and branching the story is, and you really get to decide what kind of detective you want to be.

    8 votes
  5. [8]
    emnii
    Link
    I finished Cyberpunk 2077. It has a fairly emotional ending. Took me about 50 hours in-game, doing most of the major quests and a ton of gigs. I spent a couple days in a post-game depression hole....

    I finished Cyberpunk 2077. It has a fairly emotional ending. Took me about 50 hours in-game, doing most of the major quests and a ton of gigs.

    I spent a couple days in a post-game depression hole. After finishing it, I immediately did what I always do and looked up how many other endings there are. I found there's a secret ending and I thought I had done what it takes to get it. I just needed to make a couple different choices in the last hours. So I tried that and it didn't work. I didn't make many manual saves, but I still had one that would allow me to do what it takes to open up the secret ending. It'd mean losing about 10 hours of gigs and other side quest progress.

    I put it down and fired up Deux Ex: Mankind Divided. This is probably the closest mechanical equivalent of Cyberpunk. I got reminded that this game has all sorts of performance issues on PC. I still can't run it at 4K resolution, "ultra" settings, and that's pretty surprising for a four year old game. I dialed everything back to make it run smoothly and got to work on a lethal playthrough. I'm dying constantly. I can't melee two enemies in short order without eating battery juice. I'm early in the game, so I can't hack anything remotely yet. I really enjoyed this game the first time I played it, but it's got a real rough start.

    Last night, I fired up that 40 hour Cyberpunk save. I'm going to get that secret ending. By the time I wrap that up, it should be Friday. I'll have a pile of Humble Choice games to play, and then I can take advantage of holiday sales to get something new.

    7 votes
    1. [7]
      Erik
      Link Parent
      I also thought I had accidentally stumbled into the correct choices for the secret ending, but when I tried to do it, it never triggered. I read one guide that said it was (minor spoiler) getting...

      I also thought I had accidentally stumbled into the correct choices for the secret ending, but when I tried to do it, it never triggered. I read one guide that said it was (minor spoiler) getting your Johnny rating to exactly 70%. While there are some very specific choices you need to make on the Chippin' In side quest to make this happen, apparently picking them (as I did) isn't enough. Your general interactions with Johnny have to have been positive, but not kiss ass up to that point. Sounds like a very tough needle to thread in a game that took me about 85 hours to beat.

      I'll probably wait for a director's cut or something before I try to thread the needle on the secret ending.

      1 vote
      1. [6]
        hungariantoast
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        There are some videos out of people getting the secret ending with as low as 40% affinity, so I'm not sure anyone actually knows for sure what the specific requirements are yet. For me, the first...

        There are some videos out of people getting the secret ending with as low as 40% affinity, so I'm not sure anyone actually knows for sure what the specific requirements are yet.

        For me, the first guide I followed for the Chippin' In dialogue options was actually incorrect, so I had to reload and lose about five hours to get it right. Doing that, and then completing a few more side quests before the big ending, got me to exactly 70%.

        So, who knows.

        Overall though, I actually think it's really stupid that there even exists a secret ending, and frankly, if your game has "good" or "bad" endings, then you need to rethink your storyline, because the choice between a good or bad ending is no choice at all, and putting the "best" ending behind some secret requirements is dumb in my humble opinion.

        /rant

        2 votes
        1. Erik
          Link Parent
          Interesting. Yeah, I guess people still have to figure out exactly what the requirements are. I think it's fine to have certain endings hidden, but in a game this complicate that requires so many...

          Interesting. Yeah, I guess people still have to figure out exactly what the requirements are.

          I think it's fine to have certain endings hidden, but in a game this complicate that requires so many hours, that having to thread such a tight needle across so many quests to get it is a little nuts. Especially since, as you point out, it's considered the "best" ending.

          Though I did like the nomad ending well enough anyway. But I'm pretty discouraged about having to do so much all over again (the only save I have from before Chippin' in is like thirty hours ago) to get anything else. So, I'm in no rush to play again. I have plenty of other stuff to get in too.

          2 votes
        2. [4]
          cfabbro
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          AFAIK the "secret ending" is definitely not the "best" one. And given how ridiculously difficult and unrealistic it is, I very much doubt it would be the canonical ending either. It's basically...

          Overall though, I actually think it's really stupid that there even exists a secret ending, and frankly, if you're game has "good" or "bad" endings, then you need to rethink your storyline, because the choice between a good or bad ending is no choice at all, and putting the "best" ending behind some secret requirements is dumb in my humble opinion.

          AFAIK the "secret ending" is definitely not the "best" one. And given how ridiculously difficult and unrealistic it is, I very much doubt it would be the canonical ending either. It's basically just an easter egg for masochists, and in fact, as far as I understand, it's actually not even unique at all in terms of its outcomes for you or Johnny. If you manage to actually trigger and pass it, it basically just leads to the exact same ending choices as those that occur in the Rogue ending, with the only difference being the fate of one of the related NPCs who doesn't even really matter in the grand scheme of things. Supposedly the only real difference between it and the Rogue ending is that it has a unique final mission that is much more difficult due to it having way more enemies and unavoidable combat in it, and once you start it the game immediately switches into ironman mode where you can no longer save, and if you die at any point afterwards you immediately go to the end credits.

          And as for "good/bad/best" endings, over my 3 playthroughs I have managed to get every ending but the secret one (which I am not even going to bother with, BTW), and IMO none of them are really "good/bad/best"; Some are extremely dark, and others are slightly more positive/hopeful, but they are all interesting in their own unique ways, and are all worth experiencing.

          2 votes
          1. [3]
            hungariantoast
            Link Parent
            Sorry if I come across as annoyed (I am, but not at you) or this comment is hard to follow. I've got a raging headache and have sort of been all over the place the past few days. Just to be clear,...

            Sorry if I come across as annoyed (I am, but not at you) or this comment is hard to follow. I've got a raging headache and have sort of been all over the place the past few days.


            Just to be clear, I have not personally explored any of the game's other endings just yet, I'm just calling it the "best" ending because that's what other people are calling it. The consensus seems to be that it's the "best" ending, and that for the rest of the endings some of them are "bad" and some of them are "good" (or more accurately: "worse" and "better"). I don't know if I personally agree with that yet or not because, like I said, I have not played through them, but that's the consensus I have read online. (And when I say "read online", I'm not talking about Gamers on Reddit, I'm talking about reviewers and game journalists, people whose opinions are worth actual consideration.)

            Regarding the final scene of the secret ending (spoilers, obviously)

            Ugh.

            I really did not like how the final scene of the secret ending played out. I just solo'd Arasaka Tower, became the proprietor of the Afterlife, and am on top of the world. Now I'm going to go complete an "impossible job" that's going to cement me as the greatest legend Night City has ever seen.

            I'm fucking pumped. I'm going to rob a space casino!? Suit me the fuck up.

            Except, no, I don't get to rob a space casino, I get to watch my character, who I could never get to look quite right, exit a spaceship and float towards the space casino for sixty seconds before the game fades to black.

            Fuck. That.

            This game totally blue-balled me. Like a lot of the other parts of Cyberpunk 2077, the secret ending feels unfinished. I really can't think of a good reason to not let the player actually go through with the heist, live or die, and then give them some actual closure in whatever scene follows that.

            Unless, of course, CDPR is just setting themselves up for a sequel, or like many other parts of the game, they didn't have enough time to finish it properly.

            Now, regarding unlocking the final scene, let's assume the most charitable interpretation of its requirements:

            • Choose two specific dialogue choices during the "Chippin' In" quest
            • Wait five minutes on the roof for Johnny to speak to you

            (There might be more to it, a lot more, but like I said, let's be charitable.)

            Here's the thing, I had to lose about five hours of my playthrough to go back, choose the correct dialogue options, and unlock the secret playthrough. The user above me? They'd lose thirty hours, just so their character could say a few different words.

            I really think that's just a stupid, arbitrary decision that makes no actual sense. Hell, even the dialogue options that you're supposed to choose don't make sense to me, as far as they eventually cause Johnny to offer up the secret ending.

            But either way, my point is that unlocking the secret ending is this ridiculously tedious path that you have to stick to, exactly, and may cost you dozens of hours of play time (or more) if you don't learn about it and follow a guide soon enough. It's one of the most effective time wasters I have ever seen in a video game.

            The way I see it, if they really wanted to have a secret ending, and not just offer that path up immediately with all the other endings, then only making the player wait five minutes on the roof with Johnny would have been fine. I really struggle to find any justifiable reason for the simultaneously obtuse and tedious dialogue requirements that have no doubt wasted hundreds, if not thousands of hours of peoples' time by now. It just seems very silly to me and I think it's a case of bad design.

            And if you do manage to beat it, it basically gets you the exact same results as the Rogue endings, with only one very minor difference.

            If that's true, then I am even more disappointed. Considering what is required to unlock the secret ending, it should have been its own distinct path from beginning to end.

            I don't know, I just feel that, like a lot of other things in the game, this feels underdeveloped.

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              cfabbro
              (edited )
              Link Parent
              I suppose I understand your frustration a bit, but if I'm being honest here, IMO you basically did this damage to yourself by looking up the secret ending and how to unlock it in the first place,...

              I suppose I understand your frustration a bit, but if I'm being honest here, IMO you basically did this damage to yourself by looking up the secret ending and how to unlock it in the first place, working to achieve that, and buying into other people's hype about it. I very much doubt the "secret ending" was really meant to be something most people ever see, since it's by far the dumbest and most outlandishly unrealistic of all of them; Soloing Arasaka tower... really? As such, it's probably nothing more than an Easter egg, not a legit ending, and not ever intended to be one... so calling it "unfinished" is a bit silly.

              IMO you would have been far better off just playing naturally, and getting the ending you got based on the choices you naturally made while immersed in the game, since all the other "normal" endings were much more satisfying anyways.

              1 vote
              1. hungariantoast
                Link Parent
                Well, just to be clear again, I never spoiled the content of the secret ending for myself, I just read that there was a secret ending, found a guide to unlock it, which turned out to be incorrect,...

                Well, just to be clear again, I never spoiled the content of the secret ending for myself, I just read that there was a secret ending, found a guide to unlock it, which turned out to be incorrect, then went five hours back using another (correct) guide, and finally got the ending. At no point did I actually spoil any of its details for myself.

                So, my dissatisfaction was coming to me live as I experienced it for the first time. I didn't know what was going to happen until it did (or... didn't, really).

                As far as the argument that I should have just played the game and let it run its course naturally, there's nothing inherently wrong with that argument, but I really feel like games like Cyberpunk 2077 (or Dishonored, or Metro) would be a lot better if they didn't make these arbitrary decisions for me. The secret ending was fucking awesome right up until the very end, when it wasn't, and if they'd just fix that, it'd by far be one of my favorite endings to a game ever, because that shit was cool as fuck and challenging enough to feel earned.

                My point is, sure, maybe it is just my fault for wanting to optimize my gameplay to achieve a specific ending (even if I don't know the content of that ending), but I really think games would be better if we didn't need to optimize, if these choices could just fall into our lap, and still have meaning, without us having to fulfill arbitrary requirements that don't make any sense.

                Again, I haven't played them, but from what little I know, CDPR did what I described above really well with the other endings in the game. The player does an obvious thing (like completing a chain of sidequests), and then an obvious choice falls into their lap later on as a result. Now they get to experience ending B, or whatever.

                The secret ending isn't like that though. It should be, but it isn't, and that's why I think it should be a lot easier to unlock, because it detracts from the experience of some players, even if it's the players' fault.

                And half the job of making a game is protecting the players from themselves.

                1 vote
  6. vegai
    Link
    Just finished Control's main quest, most of the Hartman side quest and now doing Foundation. A very good game. Lots of interesting and fun lore and some memorable characters. Ahti of course is...

    Just finished Control's main quest, most of the Hartman side quest and now doing Foundation.

    A very good game. Lots of interesting and fun lore and some memorable characters. Ahti of course is brilliant (especially so as I'm Finnish so there's lot to be recognized in him). The Board is amusing with their/its use of singular concepts that seem to conflict with itself.

    The action gets slightly repetitive and boring as always in a game like this, but somehow keeps being interesting still thanks to the not exactly typical powers and weapons.

    Can recommend.

    6 votes
  7. [2]
    knocklessmonster
    Link
    I'm playing Stardew Valley. My first save was broken to hell, with bugs that caused me to lose my pan, and I think something else, plus I used the wallpaper cheat to get a Galaxy Sword without...

    I'm playing Stardew Valley. My first save was broken to hell, with bugs that caused me to lose my pan, and I think something else, plus I used the wallpaper cheat to get a Galaxy Sword without putting in the word, then ultimately deleted it. I decided with the 1.5 update being so huge, I'd turn on the new one-year run feature, and see how quickly I can do it. I don't think I'll make it, but if I finish in Year 2, I'll be happy. I'm already approaching level 60 on the mine, and find buying upgraded weapons every level, if you can afford it, is worth doing.

    I'm still working through the THPS series, but with less gusto on Underground. I don't like how it has two walk/caveman buttons, but no spine transfer button and I don't know of a way to hack it in somehow. Playing 4, THUG:PRO (Underground 2 with a bunch of mods) some American Wasteland, and 1+2 around it, Underground just feels awkward, with more bails.

    5 votes
    1. bkimmel
      Link Parent
      That 1.5 update for Stardew looks really fun. I'm playing on Switch, so hoping we get it pretty soon. I'm gobsmacked every time I think that just 1 dev made that whole experience alone. Makes me...

      That 1.5 update for Stardew looks really fun. I'm playing on Switch, so hoping we get it pretty soon. I'm gobsmacked every time I think that just 1 dev made that whole experience alone. Makes me want to move out to the country every time.

      3 votes
  8. mir
    Link
    I've been playing Cyberpunk 2077 for the last few weeks - I can probably finish the main story in a couple of hours, but right now I'm just running around the map seeing if there are any side...

    I've been playing Cyberpunk 2077 for the last few weeks - I can probably finish the main story in a couple of hours, but right now I'm just running around the map seeing if there are any side quests left that are still interesting and not just simple fetch/kill/rescue open-world filler.

    Playing it on a PS4 Pro has been an... interesting experience. I love the characters, the soundtrack and the lore behind the world, but of course the game crashes every hour or so, and some of the bugs are immersion-breaking. I'm glad I bought it though - I rarely finish games, but this one I'm actually interested in completing, if only for the story aspect of it.

    5 votes
  9. [2]
    rogue_cricket
    (edited )
    Link
    Been playing Wakfu. I'll be honest, it's not super great, but something about it makes me come back to it every once and a while. I think what I like about it is that it's a turn-based tactics MMO...

    Been playing Wakfu. I'll be honest, it's not super great, but something about it makes me come back to it every once and a while. I think what I like about it is that it's a turn-based tactics MMO and that's something that's hard to find. Plus I think the art is cute in places and I liked the TV show! Another good thing about it is that every class feels radically different. My favourite so far is the Pandawa, which is a class whose signature skills are chucking people around the battlemap and using a barrel of sake in various ways for damage, healing, and support.

    Dofus, a similar game by the same studio, is generally regarded as better but I haven't touched it in even longer! It's also a team-based tactics MMO, but in this case I don't know anyone else who plays it, whereas I'm in a guild on Wakfu.

    EDIT: Oh, and I recently went through the game "We Were Here" with one of my brothers. It's a puzzle game with asymmetrical roles, and I've been really into asymmetric multiplayer games for a while. This one was quite good, although short, and it was also free! I recommend giving it a try.

    4 votes
    1. kfwyre
      Link Parent
      My husband and I played through We Were Here a while back and really enjoyed it! I snagged the two sequels in the Steam sale for us, and we plan on going through them soon.

      My husband and I played through We Were Here a while back and really enjoyed it! I snagged the two sequels in the Steam sale for us, and we plan on going through them soon.

      4 votes
  10. [6]
    kfwyre
    Link
    Celeste I have replayed Celeste three times in the past month. This time, I'm going for all jewels and strawberries in the main game, before attempting post-game content for the first time. I have...

    Celeste

    I have replayed Celeste three times in the past month. This time, I'm going for all jewels and strawberries in the main game, before attempting post-game content for the first time. I have enjoyed replaying the game more than I did my original playthrough, and part of the reason I have returned for re-replays is that now that my skills are sharpened, the game's challenging-yet-attainable aerial acrobatic feats are much more fluid and satisfying to complete. I don't play a lot of games for the joy of mastery, but Celeste feels amazing to play once the controls and game's mechanics are familiar under your fingers. Also, the final chapter in the main game is nothing short of magical.


    Verlet Swing

    You know when you get that deep-seated and unshakeable hankering down in the depths of your bones that won't go away until you've played a grappling hook game? No? Just me, then? Well, Verlet Swing is the perfect way to scratch that itch. The "feel" of grappling hook games is hard to get right, and this one gets it right. I'm not sure exactly what makes it work, only that the game's movement is a joy.


    Borderlands 3

    Finished the main game and first DLC with my husband. It's Borderlands -- we know exactly what we're getting and are enjoying the mindless, shooty romp through ascending numbers. The story and plotline is probably the worst in the series, but the gunplay is probably the best.

    4 votes
    1. [5]
      joplin
      Link Parent
      In fact I do! Have you played A Story About My Uncle? My nephew turned me on to it, oddly enough! It's a pretty fun grappling hook game. Thanks for pointing out Verlet Swing! I've downloaded it...

      You know when you get that deep-seated and unshakeable hankering down in the depths of your bones that won't go away until you've played a grappling hook game?

      In fact I do! Have you played A Story About My Uncle? My nephew turned me on to it, oddly enough! It's a pretty fun grappling hook game.

      Thanks for pointing out Verlet Swing! I've downloaded it and will give it a try this week!

      5 votes
      1. [2]
        Deimos
        Link Parent
        Another recent one that looks really good is Cyber Hook. It's currently 75% off on Nuuvem, and that might be a pricing mistake since it's only 30% off on Steam and has never been below 50% off...

        Another recent one that looks really good is Cyber Hook. It's currently 75% off on Nuuvem, and that might be a pricing mistake since it's only 30% off on Steam and has never been below 50% off anywhere else.

        @kfwyre

        5 votes
        1. joplin
          Link Parent
          Looks interesting! Thanks!

          Looks interesting! Thanks!

          3 votes
      2. [2]
        kfwyre
        Link Parent
        Hello kindred spirit! I thoroughly enjoyed A Story About My Uncle, and it is all sorts of perfect and heartwarming that your nephew recommended it to you. :) Verlet Swing is very different -- a...

        Hello kindred spirit!

        I thoroughly enjoyed A Story About My Uncle, and it is all sorts of perfect and heartwarming that your nephew recommended it to you. :)

        Verlet Swing is very different -- a much more "pure" grappling hook game without the narrative and powers of A Story About My Uncle. Furthermore, Uncle's grappling is more linear and point-to-point, whereas Verlet's is more about continuing momentum through strategic swinging. You can't land on surfaces in Verlet, so each level is about maintaining a continuous line through to the finish. They're both great in their own ways though, and I like them both for different reasons.

        On the subject of grappling hook games, if you liked A Story About My Uncle, you might also like The Free Ones. It's not as good or polished as Uncle, but the gameplay style and mechanics are almost a carbon copy.

        3 votes
        1. joplin
          Link Parent
          Yeah, I downloaded it and tried it out. It's very difficult! There's also something I'm clearly missing. I see that others can clear a level in like 3 seconds, when I'm taking like 15 seconds, and...

          Verlet Swing is very different -- a much more "pure" grappling hook game without the narrative and powers of A Story About My Uncle.

          Yeah, I downloaded it and tried it out. It's very difficult! There's also something I'm clearly missing. I see that others can clear a level in like 3 seconds, when I'm taking like 15 seconds, and can't see any way you could even move that fast! This will be a good challenge!

          3 votes
  11. Pistos
    Link
    The Steam Christmas/Winter sale had quite a few titles from my wishlist on them, so I grabbed a bunch. Among them: Total War: Attila: This seems like a good game, but, unfortunately, it is...

    The Steam Christmas/Winter sale had quite a few titles from my wishlist on them, so I grabbed a bunch. Among them:

    Total War: Attila: This seems like a good game, but, unfortunately, it is unstable. Most of the time, the UI freezes up after a battle. I'm pretty close to just waving the white flag and calling this unplayable, and accepting the lost money.

    Battlefield V: I have hundreds of hours sunk into this on the PS4 platform, but managed to pick it up for PC on a decent sale (50% off I think?). It was a so-called "Definitive Edition", which seems to have unlocked all guns for me up front, which is nice. I still have to level them up, but least I can pick all my favourites right away instead of grinding. I already have a lot of map familiarity from my time with the game on PS4, so most my time is spent levelling up the guns and training with keyboard+mouse. It's pretty stable on Linux, and, best of all, whatever anti-cheat system they're using does not have a problem with Linux at all. Overall, with about 13 hours clocked, it's only crashed maybe 2 or 3 times. That's probably unacceptable to some people, but I don't play this competitively, so I'm okay if I have to restart the game once 2 days or whatever.

    4 votes
  12. [2]
    skybrian
    Link
    After playing yet another semi-boring game of Civilization 6, I thought I'd give another strategy game a try. Crusader Kings II is free and well-regarded, so I thought I would try that. And I...

    After playing yet another semi-boring game of Civilization 6, I thought I'd give another strategy game a try. Crusader Kings II is free and well-regarded, so I thought I would try that.

    And I really don't get the UI. Even the tutorial is tough to get through because I have trouble finding stuff.

    It's kind of neat (although also horrifying) that you can arrange marriages, but rather difficult to know what to do with all the stats. Not to mention that most people are from places I never heard of and it's not that easy to look up the place where they're from.

    Also, at one point it told me I don't have enough ships but figuring out how many I needed was tough, as was figuring out how to merge fleets. At one point I thought I couldn't merge a mercenary fleet with a different one, but it turns out that a fleet in an ocean is different from a fleet in port.

    I like the concept, but this gives me a lot more appreciation for the design of Civ 6. Or maybe it's just what you're used to?

    4 votes
    1. MimicSquid
      Link Parent
      Civ 6 definitely has a different design philosophy, in that there's a lot of streamlining of the experience so you're making fewer overall decisions. CK2 and 3 both ask you to manage things in a...

      Civ 6 definitely has a different design philosophy, in that there's a lot of streamlining of the experience so you're making fewer overall decisions. CK2 and 3 both ask you to manage things in a lot more detail, and so the UI stretches to try to help you manage a much more complex endeavor. It succeeds in some ways and fails in other, but it's really down just learning it all.

      2 votes