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    1. Game soundtracks: Listening to them outside the game and how they impact the game itself

      I was curious how many people on here enjoy listening to game soundtracks outside of the game. I personally love when a game has a great soundtrack as it really adds to the atmosphere and overall...

      I was curious how many people on here enjoy listening to game soundtracks outside of the game. I personally love when a game has a great soundtrack as it really adds to the atmosphere and overall immersion in the game. I also like collecting physical copies of them as well.

      If you do, which ones are your favorite? Personally I love Shin Megami Tensei, Final Fantasy, and Blazblue soundtracks the most.

      19 votes
    2. What were/are your favorite flash/browser games?

      Flash is gonna die for good in a few days (dec 31st) so I felt this is a good time to ask this question. (Although obviously, there have been large efforts to preserve these when the developers...

      Flash is gonna die for good in a few days (dec 31st) so I felt this is a good time to ask this question. (Although obviously, there have been large efforts to preserve these when the developers did not. And even then, HTML5 means browser games will continue to exist, even though mobile games have mostly replaced browser games anyway.)

      Mine personally were (taking away some of the more well-known ones):

      Gravitee 2

      Basically a game of celestial golfball. Had a level editor, which was quite fun.

      Bonk.io (although this one has a sequel that's not in flash)

      Pretty popular for a flash game made in 2016. Basically a game where balls need to "bonk" eachother out of the playing field.

      Effing meteors (Definitely one of the games that I probably remember being better than it is.)

      Basically a game where you clump up small meteors into bigger meteors to destroy stuff.

      Ribbit

      A game where a rabbit and frog are fused together and need to bounce like a pogo to the end.

      Frost bite

      A mountain climbing platforming game.

      Sushi cat

      A game where you need to eat sushis quickly. Also has cutscenes.

      Flash cat

      An aesthetic racing game? Not entirely sure.

      Chisel

      A game where you drill through the planet enough times to move to the next level (man, I had some weird gameplay preferences.)

      Dillo hills

      A game where you need to time your descents to pick up speed in the hills and fly.

      Dino run

      An 8 bit game where you as a dinosaur need to outrun extinction.

      Raccoon racing

      A power-up racing game I remember playing quite a bit. Definitely designed for children, even if that's not very surprising.

      17 votes
    3. Spill your RPG character's secrets that the other party members don't know!

      I'll start: the party knows my character is a veteran of the war between the elves and the humans, but they don't know that she was duped into helping develop a type of biological warfare and...

      I'll start: the party knows my character is a veteran of the war between the elves and the humans, but they don't know that she was duped into helping develop a type of biological warfare and becoming an accessory to war crimes.

      What are you hiding?

      18 votes
    4. What makes different hack’n’slash action games distinct and special?

      I’ve been playing Bayonetta on and off for a bit of time, and now that I’m near the end of it (just started Requiem), the genre kinda grew on me, which surprised me quite a bit. I see loads of...

      I’ve been playing Bayonetta on and off for a bit of time, and now that I’m near the end of it (just started Requiem), the genre kinda grew on me, which surprised me quite a bit.

      I see loads of games being thrown in the same bag:

      • Bayonetta
      • Devil May Cry
      • Darksiders
      • Ninja Gaiden
      • No More Heroes
      • God of War
      • several Warriors/Musou games
      • etc. etc.

      So I was wondering what makes any specific game in the general genre distinct and special, and wanted to discuss in this thread.

      My experience with this genre is limited as the Switch is my first ever console, but I will share what little experience I have in a comment.

      P.S. I hope this thread will be a bit more lively than my previous try with the Different types of 3D platformers thread.

      6 votes
    5. What were the most novel, unique, or unusual games you played this year?

      I asked in another thread about the best games you played this year, which is a question that tends to surface highly polished and often highly familiar gaming experiences. This thread isn't about...

      I asked in another thread about the best games you played this year, which is a question that tends to surface highly polished and often highly familiar gaming experiences.

      This thread isn't about "best" but about the most interesting -- games that did something different or odd or tried something new. They didn't have to necessarily succeed at that, and they can be very rough around the edges or even outright bad -- what matters is that they went out of their way to offer something very much their own.

      11 votes
    6. Cyberpunk 2077: What do you think?

      As anyone who's spent any amount of time on any gaming forum would know, Cyberpunk 2077 was easily the most hyped game in the past year, if not the past few. Expectations were impossibly large:...

      As anyone who's spent any amount of time on any gaming forum would know, Cyberpunk 2077 was easily the most hyped game in the past year, if not the past few. Expectations were impossibly large: fanatics expected the immersiveness of Red Dead Redemption 2, the map detail of GTA V, and the density of a Yakuza game.

      Now that Cyberpunk 2077 has been available to the public for ~1 day, what are your impressions? Does it live up to the hype? Do the bugs detract too greatly from the experience? Is it revolutionary in some sense; or is it the inevitable cumulation of open world RPGs, excellent but ultimately derivative?

      For perspective, would you consider it a personal contender for game of the year?

      23 votes
    7. What are some games that work on the player's intent?

      Today I rewatched the Game Maker's Toolkit video on Celeste: Why Does Celeste Feel So Good to Play? I recommend watching the entire video (and all of GMT's other content), but there's this...

      Today I rewatched the Game Maker's Toolkit video on Celeste:

      I recommend watching the entire video (and all of GMT's other content), but there's this fascinating point in the video, around the eleven-minute mark, when one of the developers of Celeste says "It's like working on the player's intent rather than making it a precise simulation".

      What the developer is talking about in this quote are a few hidden features of Celeste that make the game more forgiving. For instance:

      • The player can jump even a few frames after they have left a platform
      • Dashing into a corner will gently curve the player around the corner rather than bringing them to a hard stop
      • If the player tries to jump just a few frames before hitting the ground, the game will recognize their intent and perform the jump automatically once the player hits the ground

      That last point is the most blatant example of what I am talking about. The game "realizes" what the player is trying to do, and allows them to do it, rather than punishing them for being off by a few frames/milliseconds. In this way, Celeste works on the player's intent, rather than sticking to the hard rules of its simulation.

      I think that's a really fascinating and powerful idea, but I would also be very surprised if it were actually something new and unique.

      So I wanted to ask, are there any other games that work on the player's intent? How exactly do they do it? Do they make the experience more forgiving like Celeste does, or are there any games that recognize the player's intent, but somehow make the game more difficult as a result?

      Finally, just because I am curious, in what ways, both in and out of gameplay (such as interface design) could "working on the player's intent" be used to improve game and software experiences?

      18 votes
    8. What's a noteworthy game that you never see mentioned anywhere?

      Maybe it's a random itch.io find; maybe it's a minor title from a long forgotten console; maybe it's a dev project your friend asked you to play test. Whatever it is, you think it's neat, and you...

      Maybe it's a random itch.io find; maybe it's a minor title from a long forgotten console; maybe it's a dev project your friend asked you to play test. Whatever it is, you think it's neat, and you never see it mentioned anywhere.

      Tell us about the game -- what is it? Why is it noteworthy? Do you think it deserves more recognition than it's gotten? Why do you think it's as hidden away as it is?

      21 votes
    9. Tilderinoo Gamers and Game Night

      Dear Tilderinoos I believe in doing fun things with strangers (that sounds dirtier than what was intended). How are you boys/girls/All/none feeling about gaming or Game Nights as events together?...

      Dear Tilderinoos I believe in doing fun things with strangers (that sounds dirtier than what was intended).

      How are you boys/girls/All/none feeling about gaming or Game Nights as events together? Games like Among Us, Minecraft, CSGO?
      Or Pen and Paper RPG's via Matrix/Discord/Telegram?

      I am kinda drunk right now and in that lovey-dovey level of drunkedness so this may be just a random optimistic kind of post... but what do y'all think? Would it be fun? How can it be done?

      29 votes
    10. What are your favorite mods?

      Note that this question is touched upon here, but only for very large, expansive mods. Also, I don't play a lot of games and have never installed a mod (and most mobile games don't allow it anyway...

      Note that this question is touched upon here, but only for very large, expansive mods.

      Also, I don't play a lot of games and have never installed a mod (and most mobile games don't allow it anyway and none on console) so this is mostly based on how much I like the concept of the mod and the footage I've seen of it, which is obviously to be taken with a grain of salt and is gonna be a lot different from a list from someone who actually plays the game with the mod. This list will also be biased towards well known mods and won't be expansive for the same reason.


      KSP

      Principia

      Kerbal space program simplifies gravity by only doing calculations for one body generating gravity, meaning Lagrange points don't exist and orbits are generally simplified. This mod changes that, and not just for your ship, it does for the planets too.

      RSS (Real Solar System) mod

      Title. Basically it recreates the real solar system in Kerbal space program since KSP has it's own system with it's own planets. Usually followed by Realism Overhaul (a mod with includes real rockets because the KSP system is 10 times smaller for playability) and Realistic progression (a mod that makes all those rockets disponible in the game's tech tree and would probably be high on this list.)

      Outer planets mod

      Basically a mod that adds Saturn, Uranus and Neptune analogues to the game, and some of their associated satellites, while still being relatively original. (note that they do add a pluto analogue but the stock game already has a pluto analogue. It's turned into an Enceladus analogue around the Saturn analogue.)

      Honorable mentions:

      10x Kerbol system, because it scales up all the celestial bodies in the game to a realistic size without needing to change the rest of the game.

      Tilt' em!, for adding axial tilt into the game, something that is moderately important to orbital mechanics (if your planet is inclined relative to the rest of the solar system, your orbit might need to align with the solar system instead of the planet to reduce inclination in interplanetary space.

      16 votes
    11. Confessions of NPC torment

      Shadow of War keeps crashing on me now, which has provided the inspiration for me to finally sit down and get this off my chesticles. I think bad things happen in my brain when I read the news too...

      Shadow of War keeps crashing on me now, which has provided the inspiration for me to finally sit down and get this off my chesticles. I think bad things happen in my brain when I read the news too much or don't get enough exercise.

      I remember when tormenting NPCs in games used to make me feel very sad. I was almost driven to tears by the villagers in Black & White being flattened under a carelessly dropped boulder, in fact. Over the years, though, I've found that my capacity for cruelty toward NPCs has grown considerably. I'll give a long example:

      In the game *Shadow of War*, you wage a supernatural guerrilla war against orcs in Mordor. While orcs and goblins are usually portrayed in the *The Lord Of The Rings* as being stunted, hobbling little creatures, the kind you face up against are Uruks. A basic distinction between them and ordinary orcs is that Uruks are bigger and nastier. Mordor is crawling with Uruks of various sizes, colours, tribes and fighting styles, and your job is to dominate or kill the toughest of them to rebuild the army of the dark lord in your own image.

      What sets the Uruks of Middle Earth apart from your typical NPCs, aside from the great variety in their appearance and behaviour, is the superb quality of their voice acting. Each of them has a name that reflects their character or deeds in combat. Each has his own wrestler-like introduction, complete with imaginative threats of violence. They can taunt you one last time on their knees before you deliver the killing blow, they can cheat death to come back scarred and vengeful, they can ambush you and swear they'll make you eat shrakh (they have their own vocabulary too) for killing their blood brother, and they can become increasingly obsessed with you if you either refuse to stay dead...or choose to do what I like to.

      You see, you don't always have to kill your prey. In fact, depending on their strengths and weaknesses, that might be strongly against your interests. You're supposed to be rebuilding an army, after all, and for that you need like live soldiers. So while the potential pool of captains is as deep as the infinite birthing vats of Mordor, there are some who will have a special place to you for reasons of their attributes, their fighting style, their level, or even their voice and appearance. Some Uruks sing, some rhyme, some look like cenobites, and still others might communicate like the Martians from Mars Attacks. Once you find a favourite, you can defeat them in combat and then choose to dominate them. At this point, you can recruit them...or you can shame them.

      Shaming is a mechanic that will lower an Uruk's level and place a prominent brand of your palm into their face. This can be useful if they have an iron will and you wish to remove that attribute so they can be coaxed into joining your zombie army. However, just as Uruks have a chance to cheat death or betray you, they also have a chance to react strongly to being shamed: they become deranged, losing their mind along with their power level; or they transform into much more powerful maniac.

      Finally, on to my tale of the follower who betrayed me and suffered a fate worse than death: being almost the sole object of my attention for an entire evening. I had a rather powerful follower with a suite of deadly abilities in combat, and he was a hoot to watch at work. I sent him to the fighting pit frequently, not so much to level him up as to watch him butcher his optimistic inferiors in a variety of exciting ways. Sadly, this follower eventually died in combat, and I recruited someone else to fill my emotional void. I'd actually forgotten about him until he unexpectedly surfaced in the middle of battle a few hours later, announcing that because I'd left him on the battlefield he was swearing his allegiance to the true dark lord of Team Red. A fight ensued in which I knocked him down to a fraction of health and then dominated and shamed him, before finishing off my other opponent. Not willing to let the matter rest, though, I pursued my erstwhile soldier, marking him down as Priority Uno. Again and again I would find him patrolling some quiet corner of the map and leap down upon him like a spider onto the head of an Australian electrician. After the first few shamings, he was only indignant at the repeated humiliation, but by number four, he was becoming increasingly paranoid that I was a tool sent to test him by the dark powers that ran Mordor. He would yell that this was simple to see, and to tell my infernal masters that he refused to be persecuted like this.

      Eventually, after I'd almots shamed him all the way down to level 1, I encountered him sitting quietly on a little mossy bridge and staring blankly into the ravine below. I found it momentarily moving that anywhere within miles of the blasted hellscape of Mordor could present such a remarkably tranquil, pastoral scene. I wondered, from my perch above, what he must have been thinking. Did his heart hang heavy with sadness and regret? Was he building a mental web of the conspiracy in his head? Or was he just thinking that he was so exhausted, and it was such a long way down?

      He didn't have long to ponder, because shortly afterward I broke him. I turned my one-time compatriot into a gibbering wreck unable to vocalise words beyond, "It's simple! So simple!" as he stumbled away, quaking, through the undergrowth.

      If you thought the story was already bad enough, you should probably stop here. Earlier, I mentioned that the previous captain had ambushed me during combat, and that Uruks have a chance of cheating death. Well, the other captain I was fighting at the time did just that, and was incensed that I'd maimed him. Unfortunately for him, his fighting skills hadn't improved during the mortal interim, and I decided to shame him as well for giving it a second go. He broke a lot quicker, and would do nothing (outside of attacking me) besides giggling like Bill Skarsgård's Pennywise. Once I'd sent him off for the third or fourth time, I was surprised by another orc who raged at me for destroying his blood brother's mind and swore he'd do me in for it. This was quite unusual, as Uruks don't tend to display emotion beyond anger and terror (in that order). I thought for a moment about the fact that I'd taken this Uruk's brother away in a manner far crueller than just outright killing him, and then I shamed him too. Somehow, though, it just wasn't quite as much fun, so I eventually killed him.

      In the space of a few idle hours, I had managed to turn a game full of compelling and even charming characters into something more akin to One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, then eventually the asylum from Amadeus. It was quite entertaining, in spite of the little melancholic voice in the back of my head, until I inadvertently checked myself in and dissociated entirely. I hope my in-game stats aren't being too closely observed.

      So, got any confessions of your own? Is this a potential indicator of psychopathy? How many musically talented Pushkrimps have you recruited?

      7 votes
    12. What are your favorite third-party controllers?

      What are the best controllers for console and PC that you've used that aren't just official console controllers? I'm a nerd when it comes to getting a million different input methods for games,...

      What are the best controllers for console and PC that you've used that aren't just official console controllers? I'm a nerd when it comes to getting a million different input methods for games, and I'm always looking for new ones to play with.

      Glad we'll never go back to the hellish days before Valve and various FOSS projects fixed the nightmare that controllers on PC used to be.

      15 votes
    13. What 'still/currently/actively in development' games are you following?

      Admittedly the game probably has to have a devlog of some form, otherwise this question is synonymous with "what games are you waiting for?", which is far too generic a question. The game I'm most...

      Admittedly the game probably has to have a devlog of some form, otherwise this question is synonymous with "what games are you waiting for?", which is far too generic a question.

      The game I'm most interested in is Songs of the Eons (itch.io, most active), which wants to be like Dwarf Fortress but a grand strategy game (main post, for context). Obviously they've noted that such a project will have Dwarf Fortress esque development, so waiting is very much in order.

      There's also Hyperbolica (trailer) which I've posted about here somewhat.

      There's also Hytale, Creeper World 4 and to an extent KSP 2, which I like but don't follow that regularly, for not much reason TBH.

      I'd probably also follow Deltarune but Toby doesn't seem to really do dev updates too often.

      So are there any games that you're following as they're developed?

      14 votes
    14. What are your thoughts on the next gen consoles from Xbox and Playstation?

      We are almost in a new generation of consoles and was just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on each offering. Some questions to prompt (but feel free to just share what's at the top of your...

      We are almost in a new generation of consoles and was just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on each offering. Some questions to prompt (but feel free to just share what's at the top of your mind):

      Have you preordered a system?

      Which system do you think looks best to you and why?

      How will these systems impact gaming on PC?

      Would you get the digital or disc version?

      Will these consoles affect Nintendo's plans?

      Has Microsoft re-claimed any of their lost momentum from the Xbox One launch?

      What features are most important to you?

      If you aren't planning on buying at launch, is there something you are waiting for?

      16 votes
    15. What are the oldest games you still regularly play?

      For the purposes of the question, I want to ignore official remasters/rereleases since those are essentially separate, newer full releases. I'm interested in old, original games. Titles that you...

      For the purposes of the question, I want to ignore official remasters/rereleases since those are essentially separate, newer full releases. I'm interested in old, original games. Titles that you can "manually remaster" yourself with mods are fine, since you're still playing the "original" game to some extent.

      Also, "regularly" in the title doesn't have to mean daily/weekly and can instead be "once every couple of years".

      • What keeps you coming back to them?
      • Is your love for the games strictly nostalgia-based, or could an unacquainted newcomer still find similar value in them?
      • If there are any modern games that try to scratch the same itch, do they succeed or fail?
      • Would you want an official remaster of the game (if one isn't already available)?
      25 votes
    16. Crusader Kings III early thoughts and impressions?

      I've only played for a couple of hours so these really are "impressions". Positively i'll say its probably PDS's best release. Very few bugs and they are mostly minor that i have seen. There seems...

      I've only played for a couple of hours so these really are "impressions".

      Positively i'll say its probably PDS's best release. Very few bugs and they are mostly minor that i have seen. There seems to be enough generic and western european content to keep most fans happy, at least for a couple of weeks. I surprisingly like the UI colour and set up. I thought it was a bit modern in the dev diaries but it works well and is less tacky than a thematic scheme might look. The cycling of the map modes on zoom works well. The amount of "meme" is really overplayed on the reddits and marketing, ive only played a few hours but the flavour reminds me of early CK2 rather than late Glitterhoof CK2.

      My main negatives at the moment are i find there is often an overwhelming amount of information on screen between the side panels, the alerts tab at the top and how wherever you put your mouse seems to open one or more information popups its a bit cluttered.

      I thought the 3D characters would be more memorable than the 2D portraits but i find the opposite. I cant remember any of the characters by image, they all feel very similar. This might be until i am more familiar with the differences though.

      17 votes
    17. How can we encourage more posts with comments here?

      On this page, I see posts, but no comments. It's a see of death. The same is true of all game design subreddits. Despite this being a thing a lot of people find interesting, there doesn't seem to...

      On this page, I see posts, but no comments. It's a see of death. The same is true of all game design subreddits. Despite this being a thing a lot of people find interesting, there doesn't seem to be any really successful community oriented way to talk about this type of thing.

      What types of posts do you think we could make to bring this space to life?

      Personally, I think in-depth reviews of games you've played a lot are the way to go. Say you're a grandmaster at chess. Give it a review. Have you played Monopoly into the ground? Critique it. I'd like to start discussing here to, what other ways are there to liven this up?

      I also may start posting speculative designs. So, game rulesets I've come up with, asking for comments from others on what they think I should look out for.

      9 votes
    18. Do you own a VR headset?

      I recently got my significant other into Eurotruck Simulator 2 and was given the go-ahead to purchase a VR headset so that we can better experience the various sim games out there. Unfortunately,...

      I recently got my significant other into Eurotruck Simulator 2 and was given the go-ahead to purchase a VR headset so that we can better experience the various sim games out there. Unfortunately, the complete Valve Index package is back-ordered about 8 weeks so it will be a while before I can take the plunge and buy one.

      Was just curious though if anyone here also has a VR headset and what their experience has been with it. I had a 1st generation Oculus Rift a long time ago but ended up selling it since I felt the software wasn't there (2016) and I could really only play the seated experiences with a 360 controller so I felt I was behind the curve even on my 1st purchase.

      Some prompts to help spur discussion, but feel free to share what you would like to share:

      • How often do you play on your headset?
      • What games/experiences would you recommend?
      • What games/experiences do you not recommend?
      • What headset do you own/have you tried any others?
      • Are there any accessories or peripherals that are worth checking out?
      13 votes
    19. What was the first game you ever loved?

      I'm interested in hearing about the first game you ever loved and, more importantly, what it was that made you feel that way. Don't just give me the game title, but tell me the whole love story!...

      I'm interested in hearing about the first game you ever loved and, more importantly, what it was that made you feel that way. Don't just give me the game title, but tell me the whole love story!

      If more than one game fits the bill, that's fine too. I'd love to hear about all of them.

      23 votes
    20. What are some beautiful/brilliant/inventive games that were panned by critics?

      In your opinion, what is a game/what are some games that were inventive/unique/original or just otherwise superb that you feel didn't receive the praise it deserved? Personally, I feel that the...

      In your opinion, what is a game/what are some games that were inventive/unique/original or just otherwise superb that you feel didn't receive the praise it deserved?

      Personally, I feel that the Scribblenauts series (Mainly the first two) are amazingly imaginative games that I don't hear talked about often. I feel that this is perhaps due to its being on the DS, a platform that was sort of mired in shovelware. I hadn't ever seen a game quite as painstakingly made as this one. The developers clearly had fun thinking of all the different ways to solve their puzzles. The soundtrack is also unexpectedly wonderful, and is very reminiscent (imo) of Katamari Damacy

      Edit: I suppose mediocre popular reception would have been a better way to say it instead if critical reception

      22 votes
    21. If you had to teach a class on an element of gaming, which games would you put on your syllabus?

      Here's the task: pretend you're a professor! You have to do the following: Choose a focus for your class on gaming (with a snazzy title if you like) Choose the games that you, as a professor, will...

      Here's the task: pretend you're a professor! You have to do the following:

      • Choose a focus for your class on gaming (with a snazzy title if you like)
      • Choose the games that you, as a professor, will have your class dive into in order to convey key concepts
      • Explain why each game you chose ties into your overarching exploration

      Your class can have any focus, broad or specific: level design in first-person shooters; the history of pixel art; the psychology of non-linear narratives; the use of sound effects in mid-2000 platformers; the limitations of turn-based systems in tabletop strategy games, etc. Anything goes, and any forms of gaming are valid!

      After choosing your specific focus, choose games that you would put on your syllabus as a sort of "required playing" for students, and talk about why you've chosen each item and what it brings to the table. If you decide to choose, say, NetHack and The Binding of Isaac for your class on "Roguelikes, Roguelites, and the Fallacy of the Berlin Interpretation", discuss how those particular games illustrate some of the key concepts you want to convey to your learners.

      While I'm intending this to be serious and straightforward, I also like the idea of people having fun with it, so feel free to come up with some less serious or more entertaining classes. I'd love to see the outline for course that explored, say, the history of exploding barrels or an investigation of taste levels in the fashion of JRPG outfits.

      19 votes