Autoxidation's recent activity

  1. Comment on Two weeks with the Steam Deck in ~games

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    Thanks for the shoutout, glad you're enjoying it! I just finished up Ori and the Blind Forest tonight on it, and being able to remap the abxy buttons to the back buttons made the game so much more...

    Thanks for the shoutout, glad you're enjoying it! I just finished up Ori and the Blind Forest tonight on it, and being able to remap the abxy buttons to the back buttons made the game so much more functional to play instead of darting a thumb around trying to hit multiple buttons at the same time. Felt really good. It took a little time adjusting to them but I'm glad they're there.

    I haven't seen that issue you've had with the friend's list, but I do recommend restarting the device once a week or so. That tends to happen anyway now with the frequent system updates.

    With the latest update adding Remote Play Together, I picked up Nickelodeon All-Star Brawl (Nick Smash clone) and tested it out hosting with the deck. I was impressed with how seamless the experience was, and there was no noticeable lag for me or that my friends mentioned.

    I've really been impressed with the device so far, and I haven't even really dug into the emulator side of it at all yet. Gotta make more of a dent in that steam backlog first.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on Starfield sounds way too big in ~games

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    I'm looking forward to it. At the very least, it's an enormous canvas for mods. Hopefully it'll be another entertaining space game to sink some hours into.

    I'm looking forward to it. At the very least, it's an enormous canvas for mods. Hopefully it'll be another entertaining space game to sink some hours into.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on A few more things added to Steam Deck in ~games

    Autoxidation
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    I've had mine since mid-April. I don't use it every night, but at least every week, depending on the situation. So far I've finished Elden Ring, almost done completing the campaign of every Halo...

    I've had mine since mid-April. I don't use it every night, but at least every week, depending on the situation. So far I've finished Elden Ring, almost done completing the campaign of every Halo in the Master Chief Collection, and I'm about 20% (total guess) through Ori and the Blind Forest. Other than Elden Ring, those others have been sitting in my library waiting for me to get to them, and the Deck has been a great excuse to visit some of the neglected purchases in my library. It's pretty easy to set up for emulation too.

    If you have kids, or feel the need to have some mobility gaming (sometimes I just sit in the same room as my wife and she plays her Switch and I play the Deck while we casually chat about things), then I would recommend it. If every time you want to play, you have your computer available, then maybe you don't have a strong need or desire for one.

    Alternatively, you could flip it for a decent profit, if you want to do so. There's certainly the demand for it.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    Autoxidation
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    I haven't gotten to play much with the emulation side of the deck yet, so no real comments there. There was a beta software build a bit ago that recently got pushed to the main deployed system...

    I haven't gotten to play much with the emulation side of the deck yet, so no real comments there.

    There was a beta software build a bit ago that recently got pushed to the main deployed system build that allows users to set the native refresh rate of the screen. This enables a 40hz profile, and you can then set the deck to follow at 40 fps. It's a pretty big power saver, a smooth 40 fps is substantially better than 30 fps, or erratic frames. This can really help you stretch the deck's battery, especially when playing more modern or more demanding games.

    The deck UI makes it really easy to see other community created control profiles for each game, and then you can edit then however you like. These are also voted on, so it gives a good starting point when starting up a new game if you're looking for something different than the default control setup for that game.

    A battery pack is pretty much a must if you plan to regularly take the deck anywhere. I found one on /r/buildapcsales a couple of months ago that is perfect and a great price. I try to keep mine plugged into the battery pack or the wall if I'm around the house, as the deck has a power passthrough that skips the battery, so it's not constantly discharging and recharging it. Keeping it plugged in when you can should extend the usable life of the original battery, which will be a pain to replace.

    At least when I was actively messing with mine, the default touchpad layout for the desktop view is not intuitive or good. I highly recommend changing it. I use my right touchpad to move the mouse, pressing the right touchpad as left click, and the left touchpad is setup to mimic a scroll wheel and clicking it is right click.

    Overall I have been really happy with mine. I am reminded how out of practice I am with controllers (with Elden Ring being the first game I've primarily used a controller for in at least a decade). I am now terrible at Halo lol.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    Autoxidation
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    Yay finally! I finished out Elden Ring on mine, and now I'm working on Ori and the Blind Forest and The Master Chief Collection.

    Yay finally! I finished out Elden Ring on mine, and now I'm working on Ori and the Blind Forest and The Master Chief Collection.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on 'Catastrophic scene' inside Tulsa medical building where five people died in mass shooting in ~news

    Autoxidation
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    If the defeated inaction around even the smallest changes in gun control and gun cultural in the US are a foreshadowing of the inability to act on climate change, we are absolutely fucked.

    If the defeated inaction around even the smallest changes in gun control and gun cultural in the US are a foreshadowing of the inability to act on climate change, we are absolutely fucked.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - May 23-24 in ~news

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    The NYTimes has a great visual on how the war has shifted, viewed through maps: Russia's shrinking war

    The NYTimes has a great visual on how the war has shifted, viewed through maps:

    Russia's shrinking war

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Babylon 5 (1993) retrospective/review - Part 1 in ~tv

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    Babylon 5 is my favorite show of all time. I go for a rewatch every few years. May I recommend the reddit linked episode importance guide? Try watching just the 4 star episodes and up (or 3, if...

    Babylon 5 is my favorite show of all time. I go for a rewatch every few years.

    May I recommend the reddit linked episode importance guide? Try watching just the 4 star episodes and up (or 3, if you want a fuller picture). That's either 8 or 13 episodes for season 1, so you should get through it fairly quickly. Honestly if you don't like it after the end of season 2, it might not be for you, and that's okay.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on The Warthog Project - My home flight simulator: An overview in ~games

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    This setup is incredible.

    This setup is incredible.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on The Halo TV series is the gold standard for video game adaptations in ~tv

    Autoxidation
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    I think your assessment closely mirrors my feelings on the show. Overall, I enjoyed a story in the Halo universe that I didn't know where it was going, but some of the stuff really did not work,...

    I think your assessment closely mirrors my feelings on the show. Overall, I enjoyed a story in the Halo universe that I didn't know where it was going, but some of the stuff really did not work, notably most of Kwan and the later Makee stuff. The battle scenes were awesome (if not cheesy). Several parts of the show felt like contrived high school level drama.

    Anyone who has played the games or had any passing interest in the universe knows the Covenant was in the finals steps of exterminating the human race, but I am not sure that is really the case of the Covenant in the show. We don't see them glassing worlds or exterminating human colonies. The UNSC doesn't seem to be preoccupied with defending humanity at every step. If anything there seems to be a weird stalemate war where the Covenant mostly ignores humanity but makes military incursions from time to time (abducting Makee as a child, strike on Madrigal, etc) for advance their own goals. The whole situation is kind of confusing. The lack of this agency on the UNSC/humanity makes the actions of Halsey lose their moral trade-offs from the game/book universe.

    Ultimately a very mixed bag. It certainly has many cool moments and they spent a lot of money on the series ($200 million for 9 episodes, for reference Game of Thrones averaged 10 million an episode). Functional warthogs? Amazing! The prop department hit it out of the park. The show struggled with what it wanted to be. The finale was better, and I hope they take what worked and was well received from the first season to make a better second season.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Star Trek: Strange New Worlds - S01E01 "Strange New Worlds" in ~tv

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    This episode was a solid start to the season, but I really enjoyed episode 2. Much more like the Trek of yesteryear.

    This episode was a solid start to the season, but I really enjoyed episode 2. Much more like the Trek of yesteryear.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - May 6-8 in ~news

    Autoxidation
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    The US also says it was hit by Ukrainian missiles. There was also this from a few days ago: U.S. Intelligence Helped Ukraine Strike Russian Flagship, Officials Say

    The US also says it was hit by Ukrainian missiles.

    Despite claims by Russia that an accidental fire broke out on the ship, U.S. officials confirmed on Friday that two Ukrainian Neptune missiles had struck the vessel, killing an unknown number of sailors and sending it and its arsenal to the bottom of the Black Sea.

    There was also this from a few days ago: U.S. Intelligence Helped Ukraine Strike Russian Flagship, Officials Say

    The United States provided intelligence that helped Ukrainian forces locate and strike the flagship of Russia’s Black Sea fleet last month, another sign that the administration is easing its self-imposed limitations on how far it will go in helping Ukraine fight Russia, U.S. officials said.

    The targeting help, which contributed to the eventual sinking of the flagship, the Moskva, is part of a continuing classified effort by the Biden administration to provide real-time battlefield intelligence to Ukraine.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - May 4-5 in ~news

    Autoxidation
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    U.S. Intelligence Is Helping Ukraine Kill Russian Generals, Officials Say

    U.S. Intelligence Is Helping Ukraine Kill Russian Generals, Officials Say

    WASHINGTON — The United States has provided intelligence about Russian units that has allowed Ukrainians to target and kill many of the Russian generals who have died in action in the Ukraine war, according to senior American officials.

    Ukrainian officials said they have killed approximately 12 generals on the front lines, a number that has astonished military analysts.

    The targeting help is part of a classified effort by the Biden administration to provide real-time battlefield intelligence to Ukraine. That intelligence also includes anticipated Russian troop movements gleaned from recent American assessments of Moscow’s secret battle plan for the fighting in the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine, the officials said. Officials declined to specify how many generals had been killed as a result of U.S. assistance.

    The United States has focused on providing the location and other details about the Russian military’s mobile headquarters, which relocate frequently. Ukrainian officials have combined that geographic information with their own intelligence — including intercepted communications that alert the Ukrainian military to the presence of senior Russian officers — to conduct artillery strikes and other attacks that have killed Russian officers.

    The intelligence sharing is part of a stepped-up flow in U.S. assistance that includes heavier weapons and tens of billions in aid, demonstrating how quickly the early American restraints on support for Ukraine have shifted as the war enters a new stage that could play out over months.

    U.S. intelligence support to the Ukrainians has had a decisive effect on the battlefield, confirming targets identified by the Ukrainian military and pointing it to new targets. The flow of actionable intelligence on the movement of Russian troops that America has given Ukraine has few precedents.

    Since failing to advance on Kyiv, the capital, in the early part of the war, Russia has tried to regroup, with a more concentrated push in eastern Ukraine that so far has moved slowly and unevenly.

    Officials interviewed for this article spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss details of the classified intelligence being shared with Ukraine.

    The administration has sought to keep much of the battlefield intelligence secret, out of fear it will be seen as an escalation and provoke President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia into a wider war. American officials would not describe how they have acquired information on Russian troop headquarters, for fear of endangering their methods of collection. But throughout the war, the U.S. intelligence agencies have used a variety of sources, including classified and commercial satellites, to trace Russian troop movements.

    Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III went so far as to say last month that “we want to see Russia weakened to the degree it cannot do the kinds of things that it has done in invading Ukraine.”

    Asked about the intelligence being provided to the Ukrainians, John F. Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said that “we will not speak to the details of that information.” But he acknowledged that the United States provides “Ukraine with information and intelligence that they can use to defend themselves.”

    After this article published, Adrienne Watson, a National Security Council spokeswoman, said in a statement that the battlefield intelligence was not provided to the Ukrainians “with the intent to kill Russian generals.”

    Not all the strikes have been carried out with American intelligence. A strike over the weekend at a location in eastern Ukraine where Gen. Valery Gerasimov, Russia’s highest-ranking uniformed officer, had visited was not aided by American intelligence, according to multiple U.S. officials. The United States prohibits itself from providing intelligence about the most senior Russian leaders, officials said.

    But American intelligence was critical in the deaths of other generals, officials acknowledged.

    The United States routinely provides information about the movement of Russian troops and equipment, and helps Ukraine confirm the location of critical targets. Other NATO allies also give real-time intelligence to the Ukrainian military.

    The Biden administration is also supplying new weaponry that should improve Ukraine’s ability to target senior Russian officers. The smaller version of the Switchblade drone, which is now arriving on the battlefield, can be used to identify and kill individual soldiers, and could take out a general sitting in a vehicle or giving orders on a front line.

    American officials have acknowledged publicly that the United States began giving Ukraine actionable intelligence in the run-up to Russia’s invasion on Feb. 24. Ahead of the invasion, for example, U.S. intelligence agencies warned of an impending attack on the Hostomel airport north of Kyiv. That allowed Ukraine to strengthen its defenses. Russian airborne forces were ultimately unable to hold the airfield.

    While the information the United States has provided Ukraine has proved valuable, Russian generals have often left themselves exposed to electronic eavesdropping by speaking over unsecure phones and radios, current and former American military officials said.

    “It shows poor discipline, lack of experience, arrogance and failure to appreciate Ukrainian capabilities,” said Frederick B. Hodges, the former top U.S. Army commander in Europe who is now with the Center for European Policy Analysis. “It is not hard to geo-locate someone on a phone talking in the clear.”

    Russian military tactics have also left senior generals vulnerable. A centralized, top-down command hierarchy gives decision-making authority only to the highest levels — compared to the more decentralized American structure that pushes many battlefield decisions to senior enlisted personnel and junior officers — forcing Russian generals to make risky trips to the front lines to resolve logistical and operational issues.

    “When there are problems, the general officers have to go sort it out,” said General Hodges.

    Although the administration remains wary of inflaming Mr. Putin to the point that he further escalates his attacks — President Biden has said he will not send American troops to Ukraine or establish a “no-fly zone” there — current and former officials said the White House finds some value in warning Russia that Ukraine has the weight of the United States and NATO behind it.

    Some European officials believe, despite Mr. Putin’s rhetoric that Russia is battling NATO and the West, he has so far been deterred from starting a wider war. American officials are less certain, and have been debating for weeks why Mr. Putin has not done more to escalate the conflict.

    Officials said Moscow has its own calculations to weigh, including whether it can handle a bigger war, particularly one that would allow NATO to invoke its mutual defense charter or enter the war more directly.

    “Clearly, we want the Russians to know on some level that we are helping the Ukrainians to this extent, and we will continue to do so,” said Evelyn Farkas, the former top Defense Department official for Russia and Ukraine in the Obama administration. “We will give them everything they need to win, and we’re not afraid of Vladimir Putin’s reaction to that. We won’t be self-deterred.”

    But intelligence sharing is considered a safe form of help because it is invisible, or, at least, deniable. American intelligence has given secret information to Ukraine in a wide range of areas, from Russian troop movements to targeting data, officials said.

    Last month, the United States increased the flow of intelligence to Ukraine about Russian forces in the Donbas and Crimea, as Kyiv’s military forces prepared to defend against a renewed offensive by Moscow in eastern Ukraine, U.S. officials said.

    “There’s a significant amount of intelligence flowing to Ukraine from the United States,” Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a Senate panel on Tuesday. “We have opened up the pipes.”

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Too many kids show worrying signs of fragility from a very young age. Here’s what we can do about it | Parenting kids with anxiety in ~life

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    This topic has come back to the front page after 2 years, and since then I've become a dad and started to pay more attention to articles such as this one and your insight. Has anything changed?...

    This topic has come back to the front page after 2 years, and since then I've become a dad and started to pay more attention to articles such as this one and your insight. Has anything changed? How has covid impacted the classroom pertaining to this topic? Have your efforts to teach kids been successful?

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - April 25-26 in ~news

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    I am really glad this is happening, and I suspect it's a large part in why Ukraine has been so effective at eliminating Russian commanders. Overall I have been pretty happy with the US response so...

    I am really glad this is happening, and I suspect it's a large part in why Ukraine has been so effective at eliminating Russian commanders.

    Overall I have been pretty happy with the US response so far, and I'm glad we have some competent adults in charge who are clearly facilitating all of this. I can't imagine how fucked this would all be under a Trump admin.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on Playdate handheld console release thread in ~games

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    Are you gonna get this or the steam deck first? It's a race!

    Are you gonna get this or the steam deck first? It's a race!

    4 votes
  17. Comment on What’s the coronavirus like where you are? in ~health.coronavirus

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    I'm in Knoxville, TN. Typically, this area is well behind the curve of the larger cities, but we're in some of our lowest reported cases ever. It's pretty much done here. Most of the area is...

    I'm in Knoxville, TN. Typically, this area is well behind the curve of the larger cities, but we're in some of our lowest reported cases ever. It's pretty much done here. Most of the area is conservative and 40-50% of the population refused to wear masks ever beyond the initial few months of the pandemic. The calm is nice, but it feels similar to the summer of 2021, when people were getting vaccinated, cases were way, way down, and everything seemed hopeful. Then delta hit.

    8 votes