clem's recent activity

  1. Comment on Weird: The Al Yankovic Story in ~movies

    clem
    Link Parent
    Ha! Glad to know that he approves of the way I watched it. I hope I can figure out a way to pay for it, though. Throwing together a silly film for $8 million in 6 weeks or so (that's my...

    Ha! Glad to know that he approves of the way I watched it. I hope I can figure out a way to pay for it, though. Throwing together a silly film for $8 million in 6 weeks or so (that's my understanding of how this was produced, anyway) is something I totally support. It was kind of a crappy movie in some ways--in general, I feel like they just stretched a lot of jokes out for way too long--but I loved watching it, anyway.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Weird: The Al Yankovic Story in ~movies

    clem
    Link
    I'm bummed that this isn't in theaters--I haven't been interested in seeing a movie in theaters in probably a decade, and when I first saw the trailer for this, I thought, finally, a movie release...

    I'm bummed that this isn't in theaters--I haven't been interested in seeing a movie in theaters in probably a decade, and when I first saw the trailer for this, I thought, finally, a movie release for me. But I'm eager to watch it, either way. It looks like there's no legal way to watch it without ads? Weird.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Man who paid $2.9m for NFT of Jack Dorsey’s first tweet set to lose almost $2.9m in ~finance

    clem
    Link Parent
    I could see it being the "Mr. Watson--come here--I want to see you" of the digital world. I'm sure a recording of that phone call, 146 years later, would be valuable. But would even that be worth...

    I could see it being the "Mr. Watson--come here--I want to see you" of the digital world. I'm sure a recording of that phone call, 146 years later, would be valuable. But would even that be worth $2.9 million? Or a link to the recording of that?

    Well, we'll see in 146 years. I wish them luck with that investment.

    13 votes
  4. Comment on Hospital refusing heart transplant for man who won't get vaccinated in ~health.coronavirus

    clem
    Link Parent
    I have to agree with lou or Iou. It's wrong in an understandable way--I think a lot of us feel it, and I wouldn't blame anyone for feeling it--but yeah, I think it's wrong. I can say from...

    I have to agree with lou or Iou. It's wrong in an understandable way--I think a lot of us feel it, and I wouldn't blame anyone for feeling it--but yeah, I think it's wrong. I can say from experience that these people who believe this have simply been mislead. I don't think they're totally wrong to distrust "the establishment" (whatever that means), but this distrust led them to loud people who took them far in the opposite direction. The conspiracy echo chambers are loud and fairly convincing if you're not well-educated enough to see how shallow they are.

    The world is complex and difficult to understand. If you feel like you have to understand it, I can see the appeal of people who seem to have all of the answers. Blame the people who mislead these "sheeple" (I'm not a fan of the term, but the irony of it seems pretty good here), not the victims like this one.

    Then again, these people's ignorance has amounted to the deaths of a lot of innocent people, so I sure can't blame you for hating them and enjoying their deaths. I can't do it, though. I have family who believe this shit, so I have seen both sides for most of my life.

    9 votes
  5. Comment on Tildes is pushing out the minority voice in ~talk

    clem
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Jumping in this comment thread out of nowhere--in my opinion, there is a fundamental problem with frowning on comments that are not lengthy and detailed. Tildes doesn't want you to comment if you...

    Jumping in this comment thread out of nowhere--in my opinion, there is a fundamental problem with frowning on comments that are not lengthy and detailed. Tildes doesn't want you to comment if you don't have time to sit down and add a thorough, detailed reply. Therefore, you don't feel like part of the community unless you have hours to devote to it.

    On Reddit, I browse a lot of different stuff. I sometimes make high-quality posts or comments on topics that I know a lot about. On other topics, I keep my mouth shut, but occasionally make "noisy" comments when I feel like it. Maybe I make a little joke or simply indicate that I agree or am part of something. I refrain from these on communities that ask me not to, like /r/Science or /r/NeutralPolitics, and on important political topics, as I feel like that kind of noise has been destructive.

    But I'm allowed to make jokes and pointless comments when appropriate, so I feel like I'm part of various Reddit communities. I'm allowed to make these comments here, but not only will it be labelled as noise or a joke, but the website doesn't want me to do this. So I don't. I'm not part of this community, and that's fine. It disappoints me, because I am eager for a Reddit replacement, but it's been clear for a long time that Tildes doesn't intend to replace Reddit, so it shouldn't matter to me.

    I guess my point is that restricting low-effort comments seems like a mistake. I am 100% behind efforts to encourage and promote high-effort, meaningful content, but discouraging the opposite means that a lot of people won't be interested in making the effort. I have no idea how any of this ties into the minority voice, but I know based on my experience that it puts a huge barrier into entering the conversation.

    17 votes
  6. Comment on What common wisdom/advice do you disagree with? in ~talk

    clem
    Link
    "Whatever doesn't kill you will only make you stronger." I'm sure this is true for some things and for some people, but my heart has been hurt in ways that really have not made me stronger. Losing...

    "Whatever doesn't kill you will only make you stronger." I'm sure this is true for some things and for some people, but my heart has been hurt in ways that really have not made me stronger. Losing my dad has never fully healed, and it never will. It's a hole in my heart that has diminished but that will remain until I die. Other people come along and fill my heart, making the hole smaller, but that place where my dad once was will always have a presence.

    I was also hurt by someone I loved. I'd been hurt before and healed, but this time, she wasn't willing to be a friend to me and help me heal. Other women had been friends and helped me through it. But this one just said no and left it at that.

    I was never one of those "incel" types (though technically I was, I suppose): I never felt like she owed me anything just because of the feelings I had for her. But this hurt, from roughly ten years ago, seems to have hurt me in lasting ways. I was very open with my feelings before that, and now, I am absolutely not, even with my wife. The hurt is gone, but some of the damage remains.

    I should note that this comment makes it sound worse than it is. But for me, this hurt did not make me stronger. Maybe it will someday. Maybe I simply haven't worked at it and should listen to that advice. But that experience made me worse, not better.

    8 votes
  7. Comment on Looking for songs like Kentucky Route Zero soundtrack in ~music

    clem
    Link
    Damn, "This World is not My Home" is really good. Looking forward to listening to the others you linked to, but maybe I just need to get Kentucky Route Zero. I've heard good things about it but...

    Damn, "This World is not My Home" is really good. Looking forward to listening to the others you linked to, but maybe I just need to get Kentucky Route Zero. I've heard good things about it but didn't realize the music was that good.

    Anyway: I would give Townes Van Zandt's Our Mother The Mountain a listen. Maybe skip ahead to "Kathleen" or "Our Mother The Mountain" if that first track doesn't grab you. The album definitely has that lonesome sound to it. I love it.

    Gillian Welch is great, too, for that lonesome mood. Here's a link to The Harrow and the Harvest.

    You might also like Magnolia Electric Company's What Comes After the Blues, though that doesn't seem like as good of a match as Townes Van Zandt or Gillian Welch.

    Maybe Sun Kil Moon, too. Here's Benji.

    I'll keep thinking about this, but this already seems like too many suggestions to process at once, so I'll stop for now. I, at least, have a ton to listen to now!

    3 votes
  8. Comment on The Results of the Actual Unofficial 2020 Tildes Census in ~tildes

    clem
    Link
    lol, you always have to comment on my response to my job, don't you? Last time, I said I have just a job, not a career--and you gave me a sympathetic response. This time, I just said, 'meh,' and...

    lol, you always have to comment on my response to my job, don't you? Last time, I said I have just a job, not a career--and you gave me a sympathetic response. This time, I just said, 'meh,' and you couldn't leave that alone. Very amusing. I simply have a job--I don't have a career! I don't dwell on it! But if you ask me what my job is, I'm going to respond, ya know?

    I'm not offended at all, I just find it amusing. I think most people have jobs, not careers, right? I'm a little sad about it, because I tried to have a career, but there's more to my life than my job. But if you ask me, "What do you do?," and I'm anonymous, I'm of course not going to respond with the bullshit good-sounding answer that I'd say in person. I'm going to say whatever I said last year, and then a year later, I'm going to say, "meh."

    Anyway. I appreciate you running this. It's enjoyable to fill out a survey. Though I have to admit, you sound a little judgmental. Last year, you told me, "we're here for you," and this year you sound a little pissed off about my "meh." I'm pretty sure it's just sarcastic and for effect, but that definitely takes away from last year's "we're here for you" (which I suppose I didn't believe anyway). I don't expect much from anonymous forums, but I guess I like when people on the internet seem sincere. And I thought there was a little sincerity last year. I knew very well that Tildes wasn't "here for me." But I'd thought that maybe whatever I said had made an impression and you were a little sympathetic. Now, I guess I think you were just saying something about the hundreds of responses you got to entertain us.

    I'm a little drunk after my three year-old's birthday party with my side of the family, so don't mind me. But there's something to this drunken comment that you might appreciate thinking about. I don't know what it is, but maybe you'll figure it out. If not, don't worry about it. I'm cool with everyone.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on If you're a parent, what is it like? in ~talk

    clem
    Link
    I'm not sure what you're looking for in asking these questions, but this seems like a fun prompt, so here goes. I'm a 38 year-old heterosexual dude; my son recently turned three. How much time do...
    • Exemplary

    I'm not sure what you're looking for in asking these questions, but this seems like a fun prompt, so here goes.

    I'm a 38 year-old heterosexual dude; my son recently turned three.

    How much time do you spend on them? My wife works full-time, so I spend most of my time with him. He used to take a roughly 90 minute nap in the afternoon, so I'd at least get that time for a break, but he doesn't seem to need that much anymore. So we get up in the morning, spend the day together, my wife gets home for dinner, we eat, I clean up, give him a bath, and then he goes to bed around 9. From 9 until whenever I go to bed (some time between midnight and 1 or so), I have free time, though unfortunately I'm too tired to do much other than kill my brain in front of the TV.

    If you aren't their biological parent I am.

    How do you parent them? I'm kind and loving but fairly strict about the things I feel are important (though I'm actually somewhat flexible if he's interested in discussing my rules calmly and rationally). I mostly go through my daily chores and try to incorporate him into them whenever possible. I try to do at least one specific fun thing with him every day, though admittedly some days are too busy for that. I honestly don't know much about "parenting" in the academic sense; I just try to treat him the way I'd want to be treated. I pretty much just love him and go from there.

    Do you follow what they're doing on the Internet or how much they use it? How much? I have almost complete control over his media use. Right now he likes watching the Winnie the Pooh show that I actually watched a bit of as a kid.

    Do you encourage them to have a good diet? How much? I do my best. We unfortunately eat too much meat, mostly because it's just easier. I can open up a pack of chicken thighs, salt them, throw some sauce on them, and bake it for an hour. Spaghetti is easy, too: saute some beef, throw spaghetti sauce on it, and let it simmer for a couple hours. The vegetarian alternatives that he is willing to eat are more involved. Falafel went well, but that took forever to make. And he doesn't quite yet have the dexterity to eat soup well. But we have at least one vegetable with every meal--usually more than that right now when we have fresh veggies from the garden. I'll do better as he gets older and more capable.

    Do you encourage them to do more chores? How much? Definitely. As much as it has made my life more difficult, I've tried to let him help me with chores as much as possible. I feel like keeping the house and our property maintained is as much his responsibility as it is mine--just as he "owns" it as much as I do (I throw ownership in parenthesis because I don't love the concept--how do I own a section of a planet that will remain for millions of years after I'm gone?--but also don't want to derail this post with that longer discussion). It's starting to go well. The other day he vacuumed the kitchen for me with only a little bit of my help. I'll expect him to contribute as much as he can, within reason, for as long as he's living here. He's as much a part of this family/homestead as I am.

    When you do this, how cooperative are they? If they aren't, what do you do to convince them? I think I've mostly covered this. If he's not willing to do something that I want him to do, I try to make a deal with him and come to some sort of compromise or I give up on it. Most of the time, fights aren't worth having, and I can understand not wanting to do certain things sometimes. I don't always want to do what I'm supposed to do. Sometimes I just need a break, too.

    How do you and your partner split the time spent taking care of them? Eh... I'm not too happy about this. My wife and I have struggled in our marriage throughout my son's life, starting with the difficulty he had sleeping for most of his life. He sleeps well enough now, but he's three, and this is a fairly recent development. For the first three months, we were happy if he slept an hour straight. For the first year, we were happy if we got a couple hours of uninterrupted sleep. This strained our marriage, and it has been downhill from there. I'd be willing to vent more if I could do so anonymously, but let's just say that I feel like I do way more than my share. I have very little time to do the things I care about. I only have this time right now because my mother in-law is watching my son today.

    What was the most unexpected thing about parenting to you? I did not expect that I would love my son as much as I do. He means everything to me. Part of this is because I spend almost all of my time on him, so of course he means everything to me--raising him is 75% of what I do, period. But he is my new partner in life (if you follow that song link, do ignore any sexual undertones--obviously I do not feel any of those aspects toward my son). He's an extension of myself.

    I wasn't 100% onboard in having a child at all, so this surprised me. I knew I would love him (and had nine months to develop feelings for him), but every day I love him more. This was unexpected.

    One unexpected aspect of this is that it gives me anxiety about death. The idea of parting with him, ever, fills me with dread. Combine this with my generic depression--suicide has been on my mind pretty much since I knew it existed as a concept (not that I've ever had a specific plan to go through with it)--and you can imagine that I have an unpleasant disposition sometimes.

    If you had a particular preference/expectation for what you wanted/expected your child to be and got something else, what did you do? I actually spent most of the time before we knew my son's sex expecting/hoping for a girl, but when we learned he was a boy, this was happy news. Mostly, though, I didn't care--I don't see much difference. There are very few things that one sex can do that the other cannot, and those things are mostly none of my business.

    As I realize now that you didn't specifically ask about sex/gender in that question... In general, I haven't had expectations or desires about what kind of person he should be. I feel that it's my job to instill certain basic values in him (I feel like it's time to wrap this post up, so I'm not going to get into that right now--it seems like that could go on for a long time), but as for who he is overall, that's up to him. I'll love him no matter what. I have no expectations other than that he should be a good person and that he should live a good life, whatever those things mean (ultimately I think those are up to him, too).

    How did birth(-ing?) go? What was it like? This didn't go super well--at one point, I thought it was possible I would lose both my wife and my son--but obviously things turned out for the best. My wife still has some pain in her C-section incision, but I don't think this is abnormal. This was so long ago that I don't have much to say about it. I've had almost three years of poor sleep, and that destroyed a lot of my memory. My past is a hazy mystery. I hope I can repair this someday, but it hasn't come back, yet. Maybe when my son is sleeping in his own bed? He sleeps better than he used to, but he still wakes up in the middle of the night sometimes, and is still in bed with us.

    What was being/seeing your partner be pregnant like? I'm afraid I don't remember this all that well. I remember that she looked amazing while pregnant, and very happy, but I don't have a strong impression of what this was like. I enjoyed the process; even the weirdness. I liked taking care of her.

    Is there anything you regret doing when parenting them? I suppose I always regret the time when I have to do chores and let him play on his own, but this is simply a necessity. We have to eat throughout the day and we have to keep the house maintained. This means he doesn't get as much of my attention as possible. But I'm always kind to him about it. I don't especially regret this, really. I think there are good lessons in this, especially since I try to include him in the daily work as much as I can.

    The biggest regret I have is not having him sooner, as I simply could've had more time with him if I'd had him when I was younger. But this is a ridiculous thing to think much about. I wasn't ready to have a child when I was younger. I was doing all sorts of other things with my life. I didn't know he existed, because he didn't exist yet, so how could I know how much I would've loved him? Plus, if I'd had a child earlier, it would've been a different child.

    Why did you have them? I mostly had him because my wife was ready to have a child and she convinced me. As a child, I expected I would one day have a child, but this feeling dwindled as I became an adult. I've always been depressed, so I didn't especially want to pass that on to anyone, and while I do have some good qualities, I didn't feel like I necessarily had genes worth passing on. But my wife convinced me. I was fairly ready. I was about 80% on-board, so it's not like I was against having a child. I simply didn't have strong feelings about it either way.

    Needless to say, as I'm sure you've gathered from this post, I am completely grateful that I did have him. Even though parenting is difficult and, simply, my life kind of sucks right now, my life is better for having him, and I'm sure it will just keep getting better.

    ...

    Thanks for asking these questions! I hope my answers were helpful and interesting to you or to someone, though actually, I've been meaning to write a letter to my son's future self (I like to do a couple of these every year as a way of providing myself to him in the future in case, ya know, I'm dead), and this will do for now. I'm happy to elaborate on anything or answer questions, though keep in mind that I don't check Tildes all that often. I'm more of a reddit user, though even there, I've been known to go a few days before getting to messages.

    13 votes
  10. Comment on Millennials slammed by second financial crisis fall even further behind in ~finance

    clem
    Link Parent
    Personally, I have no economic hope whatsoever. My wife is a teacher, and I have been working significantly less in order to stay home and take care of our son. Even if I worked full time, though,...

    Personally, I have no economic hope whatsoever. My wife is a teacher, and I have been working significantly less in order to stay home and take care of our son. Even if I worked full time, though, I would have about the same amount of money: I would simply be paying more toward my student loans. Financially, I see no way out (though I am very grateful for income-based repayment plans!).

    That aside, though, I have invested primarily my time, though also a little money, such as for seeds and plants, in building a food forest. I'm still early on in it so have little to show for it (other than some patches of amazing soil due to "stealing" leaf bags other people left on the curb to cover and feed my soil), but over the years I will turn my property into a place that feeds my family and my friends and neighbors well. Not everyone has 14 acres like I do, but a lot can grow on a typical suburban lot, too. Working on my property this way gives me a lot of hope. As long as we can pay off the mortgage, which is going well so far, by the time I want to retire, my expenses will be minimal. I'm sure I won't be able to grow all of my food, but if I can hit 50%, that should be enough to get me by.

    I say this to go along with your comment that there is no hope of our generation "achieving a better life than [our] parents['] generation had." I'm skipping back over my parents' and grandparents' lives and looking back to simple subsistence. I plan on a life of preserving food for winter, of making soap, hauling chicken (or duck?) poop around, crushing grapes for wine, and helping other people join me in sustainably growing their own food.

    I'm actually fine with all of this. As long as I have enough to house, feed, and clothe my family and myself, I don't need anything special. I have no problem with a simple life like this and encourage others to join me, as, in looking at the lifestyles of the past few generations, I see unsustainability. I see lifestyles that have, at the bare minimum, caused global warming, but overall (in my very vague, admittedly somewhat uninformed opinion) have sold the future for the present, through pollution, overuse and destruction of natural resources, and unbalanced spending.

    I bring all of this up not to suggest everyone leave cities and start their own homestead, but to encourage more people to start growing some of their own food as a means to save money. Lawns have their uses, but an unused corner of the lawn might be a great place to start a permaculture-style guild. Maybe it has an apple tree, some berry bushes, a small hazelnut tree, strawberries and clover as a ground cover, some comfrey to harvest nutrients from deep underground and feed it all, and native wildflowers to attract beneficial insects. Something small like this could (after the time/financial cost of establishing it) save a little money, provide fresh, free foods, and beautify the landscape.

    This characterization of the process simplifies a lot and makes it sound like an easy change, which it of course is not. Learning how to do this and actually doing it takes time and effort. I'm simply suggesting that it's worth learning about and doing, especially for other millennials like me who are pretty much hopeless financially. If built right, a perennial food system can mostly maintain itself, and its produce could benefit anyone.

    7 votes
  11. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of August 10 in ~health.coronavirus

    clem
    Link Parent
    I read an article about Michael Mina (possibly something you posted?) and this suggestion of cheap at-home coronavirus self-testing and have been so hopeful about it since then. If those of us who...

    I read an article about Michael Mina (possibly something you posted?) and this suggestion of cheap at-home coronavirus self-testing and have been so hopeful about it since then. If those of us who actually cared/believed in it could take a test every day, we could get pretty close to back to something normal. I would even feel comfortable playing hockey again, especially if the rink required everyone to take a test before playing. The virus could pretty much be isolated to idiots and to people who interact with idiots, and it seems to me that this would cut it down to almost nothing.

    Sorry for a comment that's little more than just gushing and echoing what you already said, but I can't help myself. I'm excited about this idea.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on What do you use your extra mouse buttons for? in ~talk

    clem
    Link
    I have the veeery old IntelliMouse Optical with one button for my thumb and one for my ring finger (in addition to the buttons for my pointer and middle fingers). The thumb button minimizes the...

    I have the veeery old IntelliMouse Optical with one button for my thumb and one for my ring finger (in addition to the buttons for my pointer and middle fingers). The thumb button minimizes the active window, while the ring finger button switches between active windows.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on An app lets you de-stress by screaming at the Icelandic wilderness from afar in ~life

    clem
    Link
    Sounds cute (as long as it doesn't annoy people visiting or living in that wilderness), but for me, the therapeutic value of screaming into the wilderness was that others could not hear my pain...

    Sounds cute (as long as it doesn't annoy people visiting or living in that wilderness), but for me, the therapeutic value of screaming into the wilderness was that others could not hear my pain and had nothing to do with a specific area to send my pain. It just needed to get out of me. Screaming into a pillow was also somewhat effective.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on What are three things you wanna do once the pandemic is over? in ~talk

    clem
    Link
    Play fucking hockey. I've missed it so much. My body feels like it's aging so much more without hockey (I'm 38), but more than that, I simply need the thrill of gliding fast over the ice, handling...
    1. Play fucking hockey. I've missed it so much. My body feels like it's aging so much more without hockey (I'm 38), but more than that, I simply need the thrill of gliding fast over the ice, handling the puck, and firing it at the net. I miss my hockey buddies a lot, too. I don't have many friends and have never really been a "dude" or a "bro," but I'm getting the hang of male camaraderie with my teammates. I like 'em.

    2. Go to a restaurant. I can't afford to eat out very often, but I enjoyed it on occasion. I'll sit at a table with my family, have a few beers, and enjoy a nice meal that I don't have to cook or clean up after.

    3. Do whatever the hell I want without wearing a mask or being so cautious. I'm full of stress simply grocery shopping nowadays, when it used to be a fairly relaxing, enjoyable experience (at least when the store wasn't busy). I'm also looking forward to the stores having most things in stock regularly again. Shopping, now, is an annoying game of finding an adequate replacement for what I actually want. I'm pretty sick of that.

    10 votes
  15. Comment on Board games with unique mechanics? in ~games.tabletop

    clem
    Link
    Two of my favorite board games are Codenames and Zendo. I could play Codenames nearly endlessly, while Zendo is a nice change of pace. I see no point in summing the games up when people have...
    • Exemplary

    Two of my favorite board games are Codenames and Zendo. I could play Codenames nearly endlessly, while Zendo is a nice change of pace.

    I see no point in summing the games up when people have already done that for me on Wikipedia:

    Zendo is a game of inductive logic designed by Kory Heath in which one player (the "Master") creates a rule for structures ("koans") to follow, and the other players (the "Students") try to discover it by building and studying various koans which follow or break the rule. The first student to correctly state the rule wins.

    [In Codenames,]Two teams compete by each having a "spymaster" give one-word clues that can point to multiple words on the board. The other players on the team attempt to guess their team's words while avoiding the words of the other team. In a variant with 2–3 players, one spymaster gives clues to the other player or players.

    The basic gameplay of Codenames is wordplay. The fun of it is stretching the meaning of words and making connections between multiple ones. For example, look at this example word list (generated at randomlists.com/random-words) (ignore the emphasis on the top row--that is simply a requirement of tables on Tildes):

    book teaching obnoxious adamant four
    messy piquant three ski nifty
    freezing island zephyr doctor rush
    cold sound profit majestic peace
    pricey silk unkempt colossal concern

    I, as the "spymaster," would give a clue trying to get you to guess certain words while avoiding other words. If I gave you the clue, "winter," you might guess, "freezing," "cold," and "ski." Similarly, if I gave you, "Christmas," I might be trying to get you to guess "freezing," "cold," "pricey," "island" (as in Christmas Island), "rush," or maybe even some other stretches, like "peace" or "profit."

    Maybe I want you to guess "cold" but not "freezing"; I'd give a clue like "snap" or "refrigerate." If I gave a clue like "eating," and you were teamed up with my wife, she might help you realize that I want you to guess "obnoxious" (because to me, the sound of people eating is obnoxious) in addition to "messy."

    As a former writer, this game is right up my alley. The more knowledge you have of words--and knowledge in general--the more fun this game can be. It's rare that you get to connect more than three words with a clue, but when you connect four or five, and your team actually guesses most of them, it is an amazing thing.

    As I've shown with that random word generator, you don't even need to buy anything to play the game. Just generate 25 words, come up with a random way to pick out which words belong to which team (and which word is the "assassin" word; if a team chooses this word, they automatically lose), and you're all set.

    I'll stop there and let you investigate Zendo on your own, since I need to get back to work, but I hope that these games have piqued your interest!

    9 votes
  16. Comment on A letter to other parents in ~talk

    clem
    Link Parent
    Are there actually problems associated with not being potty trained by 3? My son is two and a half, and the doctor was impressed recently that my son had awareness and control of when he was able...

    Are there actually problems associated with not being potty trained by 3? My son is two and a half, and the doctor was impressed recently that my son had awareness and control of when he was able to urinate. So was that just BS?

    We've taken the approach of following my son's lead with potty training, as we feel like keeping the pressure off of him will be better in the long run. But perhaps you disagree. I'm only almost offended--I'm pretty sure you're being a little tongue-in-cheek about shaming other parents. But either way, if there are actually problems with not rushing my son into potty training, I'd be interested to hear it.

  17. Comment on Anti-vaxers are not evil in ~health

    clem
    Link Parent
    Yeah--sorry for the low effort comment, but my mom was afraid of vaccines killing me, not of them making me autistic. (I was born in '82, so maybe it's a different era of anti-vaxxers and is...

    Yeah--sorry for the low effort comment, but my mom was afraid of vaccines killing me, not of them making me autistic. (I was born in '82, so maybe it's a different era of anti-vaxxers and is irrelevant?)

    2 votes
  18. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~talk

    clem
    Link Parent
    I have recently (maybe close to a year ago?) stopped using shampoo regularly, and I see little reason to look back (other than that I seem to have a bit of dandruff). My hair (edit: I forgot to...

    I have recently (maybe close to a year ago?) stopped using shampoo regularly, and I see little reason to look back (other than that I seem to have a bit of dandruff). My hair (edit: I forgot to note that I'm a dude with fairly short, curly, thick hair) is a little oily, but like you say, not in a bad way--it's perfectly clean. I rinse and scrub it in the shower, but simply don't strip it of my natural oils. Maybe once a month I use this shampoo bar to scrub my hair, but I'm always a little disappointed afterward, as it makes my hair feel pretty dry for a while.

    1 vote
  19. Comment on What are your personal picks for "Games of the Decade"? in ~games

    clem
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    As a Zelda fan since I was 6 years old (1988), this is my pick, too. I feel a little unique in that many Zelda fans do not consider this the best in the series due to the lack of typical dungeons...

    As a Zelda fan since I was 6 years old (1988), this is my pick, too. I feel a little unique in that many Zelda fans do not consider this the best in the series due to the lack of typical dungeons and linear gameplay, but I also don't care about being unique in my love for this game. To me, Breath of the Wild is in homage to what I felt when playing The Legend of Zelda, The Adventure of Link, and Link's Awakening as a child (I leave out A Link to the Past because I didn't get an SNES until many years after its release). I loved the feeling of being alone in a vast world, something I never felt in any of the other 3D Zelda games. The worlds were either too small, to[o] populated, or too linear.

    But much like in the first two Zelda games, Breath of the Wild throws you into its world, and (other than the tutorial stuff at the beginning) leaves you alone to explore. This is exactly what I did when playing those early Zelda games and when imagining I was Link (or that my Lego Robin Hood was him) as a kid. Other than the lack of spooky dungeons, Breath of the Wild was everything I'd been waiting for in a 3D Zelda. It's my favorite game of all time. What I wouldn't give to forget the game and play it again for the first time!

    10 votes
  20. Comment on I found work on an Amazon website. I made ninety-seven cents an hour in ~tech

    clem
    Link Parent
    I used to have a lot of down time in my main job, so MTurk was a great supplement. I was already on the clock for one job, so if I could make an extra couple dollars an hour doing this work, all...

    I used to have a lot of down time in my main job, so MTurk was a great supplement. I was already on the clock for one job, so if I could make an extra couple dollars an hour doing this work, all the better. I think people who focused on it as their sole job did a lot better than me, as they knew how to find the best HITs.

    It never seemed worth it to me to explore it any more. It didn't seem like, even at its best, MTurk paid a livable wage, so I just browsed /r/HitsWorthTurkingFor for decent HITs and did them when I had time. I never made more than a few hundred dollars per year. But it was easy and some of the surveys (generally academic ones) were fun. I especially liked when they asked very personal questions (I'm looking at you, Angela Listy).

    5 votes