• Activity
  • Votes
  • Comments
  • New
  • All activity
    1. 4K screen on 15" laptop - worth it?

      Pricing up my next Thinkpad (I'm a lifer for Thinkpads I think now) and I keep hovering over the 4K screen option. I'm looking at a 15.6" screen. The FHD 14" screen I currently have is lovely and...

      Pricing up my next Thinkpad (I'm a lifer for Thinkpads I think now) and I keep hovering over the 4K screen option. I'm looking at a 15.6" screen. The FHD 14" screen I currently have is lovely and sharp with a decent colour gamut, and I don't think I can see pixels, even now when the machine is literally on my lap. I'd guess the screen is maybe 35cm from my eyes at the moment.

      I don't really game, I do edit photos, video (HD, not 4K) and do a little 3D work with Blender/FreeCAD/etc. I usually run Debian/Gnome, occasionally dropping into Windows because my 3D printer's preferred slicing software is Windows only (grrrr).

      The other bonus to 4K is HDR400 and twice as many nits of brightness but again, I'm not sure that's worth an extra £250. I'd probably turn the brightness down anyway. The HDR is potentially interesting but as I don't watch TV/movies on this machine and my camera doesn't output HDR, that's likely not very useful despite sounding good. I could buy quite a lot more compute power and ram with that money instead..

      I would go and look at one in person but I have no idea where the nearest 4K Thinkpad is, in person, and even if I did, I don't really want to go into shops right now.

      Any thoughts, experiences, advice, etc would be much appreciated.

      9 votes
    2. Hive mind: In the early 2000s, there was a website that tracked and reviewed open source applications. What was it?

      You could look up, say, CMSes, get some basic info about each one (to make useful decision), and learn who its active committers were. The site closed, I know. Do you remember its name? Or people...

      You could look up, say, CMSes, get some basic info about each one (to make useful decision), and learn who its active committers were. The site closed, I know. Do you remember its name? Or people who were part of it?

      I asked someone to write an article for me about "review sites for open source" -- think Yelp for Software -- and neither of us can remember its name. But if you have others that you think should be included (for positive or negative reasons), please let me know.

      10 votes
    3. Cloud storage recommendations?

      I'm thinking of paying for some cloud storage and I'd like to hear your recommendations and experiences with cloud storage providers. I'd like the best bang/buck and preferably something that...

      I'm thinking of paying for some cloud storage and I'd like to hear your recommendations and experiences with cloud storage providers. I'd like the best bang/buck and preferably something that works well with Linux (Void is my current distro). I had been using Keybase as they offer 250GB of space for free(?), though I recently learned they've been acquired by Zoom which...concerns me. Plus, I can't seem to get the filesystem mounted on Void for some reason =/.

      Here are a few I'm considering:

      Major Players

      • Google One: $20 a year for 100GB

      • Microsoft 365: $70 for 1TB of storage + Microsoft productivity suite (that I probably won't use all that much)

      Out of these options, I think I'd prefer Microsoft at this point.

      Smaller Players

      • Cloudamo: $25 a year for 100GB. Bonus that it's built on open-source tech and looks pretty flexible.

      • pCloud: I've been seeing this recommended in my current search for a provider. But... seeing as of this posting the website is down, I'm not filled with confidence.

      • Wasabi: More of a DIY option, it'd be ~$72 a year for 1TB.

      Cloudamo looks the most promising, here.

      Complete DIY

      • I have a 2TB drive that I guess I can expose to the Internet as a fileserver. Dunno what my ISPs policy on this is and I wouldn't be confident in its reliability.

      Well, those are a few options. Got any more?

      24 votes
    4. [SOLVED] Archiving a deceased loved one's Twitter timeline, including media

      Recently a loved one of a friend has died and they would like to archive their entire timeline (no retweets), including media they posted. I've looked around a little bit and the Twitter API only...

      Recently a loved one of a friend has died and they would like to archive their entire timeline (no retweets), including media they posted.

      I've looked around a little bit and the Twitter API only allows 3200 tweets to be exported. As this includes RTs, this goes back to about 2018, while the account was made in 2011, so it's missing about 90% of their tweets. Also, getting all the media isn't really possible.

      Do any of you know a way to accomplish this? Or, can anyone direct me to scripts that crawl the page and save every non-RT tweet + potential media? I'm not very tech-oriented but I can at least run python scripts.

      I should mention that I've so far checked out Allmytweets.net (returns RTs) and the Twitter archival project (or whatever it's called), which is a group of people that help in archiving accounts, but they haven't responded yet.

      13 votes
    5. What's your computer/PC like?

      (I'd be surprised if this hasn't been asked before.) A few questions that come to my mind are: What are your computers' specs? How are your computer parts/cabling organized? (Are they?) What is...

      (I'd be surprised if this hasn't been asked before.)

      A few questions that come to my mind are:

      What are your computers' specs?

      How are your computer parts/cabling organized? (Are they?)

      What is the resolution of your monitor(s?)

      What OS is it?

      I'm not really knowledgeable when it comes to technology, so you can add you own questions as you please.

      Edit: In hindsight, my knowledge of specs is even poorer that I thought it was and I can barely read the answers. Ah well "^~^

      21 votes