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    1. Must-haves for new Mac users

      As is clear from my comment history, I'm not a fan of Apple as a company. However, the company I'm joining has standardized their development environment on Mac OS, and as an engineer I'm...

      As is clear from my comment history, I'm not a fan of Apple as a company. However, the company I'm joining has standardized their development environment on Mac OS, and as an engineer I'm certainly not one to ask people to put in a disproportionate amount of effort to accommodate what is, ultimately, a relatively unimportant moral stance - so they're provisioning me a Mac, probably a Macbook Pro. I have no idea what model.

      Mac users, what should my first steps be in order to be productive? I have a Keychron K2, 1080p monitor, and mouse on my desk attached to a Thunderbolt 3 hub, which I assume I can keep using, but I don't know what the options and expectations are for software such as window managers (I don't like the default one much, but I last used it seriously in 2016 - has it gotten better? are there alternatives?), search/command helper overlays a la Rofi, or even terminal apps.

      Thanks in advance!

      19 votes
    2. Playing devil's advocate: Is there any possible reason Apple is gluing parts in instead of using screws in newer devices other than "greed"?

      Inspired by the news of the new 13" MacBook Pro and Surface Book 3, I was thinking about just how much I hate not being able to replace the RAM, SSD or even battery in newer MacBook models. It...

      Inspired by the news of the new 13" MacBook Pro and Surface Book 3, I was thinking about just how much I hate not being able to replace the RAM, SSD or even battery in newer MacBook models. It seems like such an extreme decision and I wonder why.

      The obvious answer is to make the devices less repairable thus forcing people to upgrade sooner.

      But Apple isn't really dependent on devices breaking. Hardware is vastly improving every year and their customer base happily upgrades just for that. Also it could be argued that their most profitable product line – iPhones – have, despite all of that, some of the healthiest life cycles in the smartphone marketed with people happily using 5+ year old devices which still are supported in the latest releases of iOS. Few other devices hold their value in resale like Apple products, their sturdiness is quite remarkable and clearly factored into pricing and consumer decisions. They pride themselves with a reliable repair program and I have to imagine their repair geniuses (their term, not my sarcasm) don't like messing with glue.

      So, all things considered, is there an argument for fucking gluing in batteries other than petty greed? Like, is it cheaper? That doesn't seem a motivation behind any other major design decision on their part. Is it it lighter? Easier to cool? Does it make for a slimmer chassis?

      I tried searching the question but couldn't find anything (in fact, I wouldn't even know what terms to search for). Is there any good analysis or reasoned speculation? It somehow makes less sense the more I think of it and it would give me some head peace to at least know of some arguments for it other than Apple being assholes.

      17 votes