mftrhu's recent activity

  1. Comment on Do you enjoy programming outside of work? in ~comp

    mftrhu Link
    Well - were I to look for an artist or a photographer, I would first look for their portfolio, and open source work/side projects are a portfolio of sort. Maybe artists are too different from...

    Whats your opinion on this? Do you work on any side projects? Do you think its reasonable for interviewers to look for open source work when hiring?

    Well - were I to look for an artist or a photographer, I would first look for their portfolio, and open source work/side projects are a portfolio of sort. Maybe artists are too different from programmers for the comparison to be a good one, but I don't think it's unreasonable for interviewers to look for it. I think it's unreasonable for interviewers to discard a candidate if they don't have one, though.

    That said - and keeping in mind the fact that I do not have a job yet - I do enjoy programming and working on side projects, if only because what I work on is pretty much just tools that I use or that would make my life easier. That's why I got into programming, a long, long, long time ago - I can make the computer do stuff for me. I can even create mini-universes with it, and how cool is that?

    3 votes
  2. Comment on In my opinion, censorship is a bad way to combat hate speech. in ~talk

    mftrhu Link
    And? I despise this kind of argument. "It is just a band-aid", "it is merely palliative care", "you are only treating the symptom, and not the underlying problem" - but there isn't anything mere...
    1. I think it is a band-aid solution. People who have their voice taken away from themselves are not suddenly going to change their mind.
    2. In a way, it is a form of removing freedom of speech. Now, I understand that a lot of the companies that are censoring hate speech are doing it primarily for the sake of sponsors, but I mean this in a more broad scope.
    3. It is effectively hiding societal problems.

    And?

    I despise this kind of argument. "It is just a band-aid", "it is merely palliative care", "you are only treating the symptom, and not the underlying problem" - but there isn't anything mere about this.

    Sometimes, you can't "treat the underlying problem", and treating the symptom is the only thing you can do. More often, you can treat the underlying problem, but you first need to tackle its symptoms to keep the metaphorical patient alive for long enough for the treatment to be useful.

    And this very much applies to "censorship" of hate speech.

    You say "it's a band-aid", and that "it doesn't stop the people from thinking that".

    The only answer I have to that is a resounding and?

    That band-aid prevents harm from hate speech. That band-aid might not stop transphobes from thinking "lol t***ies should kill themselves", but when it stops them from posting it on LGBT subs, or telling that to vulnerable people, why does it matter?

    They might keep on thinking that, sure. They might even feel emboldened by the fact that they can't say it, and cry censorship, and deem themselves "martyrs" to "political correctness", but it'll still stop - or at the very least, reduce - the amount of harm that they can concretely cause.

    Is it censorship? Some think it is. I don't care, because I don't believe that the right to free speech is somehow "more important" than any of the other rights that people have, or are given. All rights are limited to some extent when they would impinge on the rights of others, and free speech is not special.

    23 votes
  3. Comment on Fire at the Notre-Dame cathedral in ~news

    mftrhu Link Parent
    The HackerNews thread had at least one person blaming the fire on "the «refugees»". Wonder of wonders, they got downvoted, but... it's ridiculous.

    The HackerNews thread had at least one person blaming the fire on "the «refugees»". Wonder of wonders, they got downvoted, but... it's ridiculous.

    10 votes
  4. Comment on Is coffee essential? Switzerland says no. in ~food

    mftrhu Link Parent
    2.7M CHF per year is much, much less than what I expected it to cost. 2.7M is basically peanuts on this scale. From the article, That's just over thirty cents per person-year! I wish they could...

    No matter how addicted I am to the stuff, the promise of coffee during the apocalypse isn't worth $2.7 million/year.

    2.7M CHF per year is much, much less than what I expected it to cost. 2.7M is basically peanuts on this scale.

    From the article,

    Residents consume about 9 kilograms (or 20 pounds) of coffee per person annually, compared to 3.3 kilograms for the average British citizen and 4.5 for Americans [...] Reserve companies pay 3.75 Swiss francs for every 100 kilograms of imported beans

    That's just over thirty cents per person-year!

    I wish they could hook me up with their dealers, even the shittiest brands cost more than €0.30 per kg.

    2 votes
  5. Comment on What are the arguments against letting user data be collected? in ~tech

    mftrhu Link
    "Real data" is not just names and credit card info. Email addresses and things that seem anonymous, or that have allegedly been anonymized, can be used to create a profile, and identify the user,...

    It's obviously bad when "real" data like full names and credit card info leaks, but most data companies collect is probably email address and some anonymous things like which buttons and when the user clicked.

    "Real data" is not just names and credit card info. Email addresses and things that seem anonymous, or that have allegedly been anonymized, can be used to create a profile, and identify the user, and track them.

    And that data will eventually be sold, or leaked, and used by entities even less scrupulous than corps.

    And, in any case, I don't want companies to collect that data. Nothing more than that is needed to "justify" doing the "privacy thing".

    17 votes
  6. Comment on How Doctors And The Church Conspired To Stop An 11-Year-Old Girl From Having An Abortion After Rape in ~news

    mftrhu Link
    "Every life is worthy" except, apparently, the life of the mother - and it doesn't matter what she wants, or how old she is, or that she is fucking eleven, or that she was raped, or that the baby...

    SAN MIGUEL DE TUCUMÁN, Argentina — Lucía sat up in her hospital bed as the priest made the sign of the cross on her forehead, the 11-year-old’s bulging belly visible underneath her pajama shirt.

    “Think long and hard about what you’re considering doing,” Lucía’s mother remembered the priest telling them. “Save both lives,” he said. [...]

    Gustavo Vigliocco, head of the health care system in the province of Tucumán in northern Argentina, wanted to make a deal with Lucía’s family — he offered to keep the baby in exchange for a house and a scholarship for Lucía [...] Vigliocco visited Lucía every day, her mother said. He was there so often that she initially “thought he was our doctor.” Vigliocco insisted on having Lucía “hang in there,” and would occasionally stroke her belly, the family’s lawyer said. He warned them that Lucía could lose her womb if they went through with the abortion.

    [...] the archbishop of Tucumán, Carlos Sánchez, decided to send a WhatsApp audio message to a group of supporters, imploring them to “guard, and serve the life of [Lucía] and her baby.” In the 70-second audio, Sánchez revealed Lucía’s real name for the first time. “Every life is worthy,” Sánchez said.

    [...] The baby, born at 23 weeks, was fragile from the start, and its health deteriorated with every passing day. Ten days later, it died.

    "Every life is worthy" except, apparently, the life of the mother - and it doesn't matter what she wants, or how old she is, or that she is fucking eleven, or that she was raped, or that the baby wouldn't be viable, or that pregnancy was putting her life in danger. Every single life is worthy except for hers.

    This story is revolting. I would say "I hope that the people involved in this travesty will be punished", but I know that nothing will be done.

    5 votes
  7. Comment on The idea of being trans has my head in a scramble in ~lgbt

    mftrhu Link Parent
    That was also my experience, and the reason for which I kept a beard for about a decade. It looked wrong, but at least I didn't have to deal with the constant anguish of making it a tiny bit less...

    I use the mirror as little as possible, and the face in the mirror is not my face. I'd rather have it with hair than without, because at least the hair covers the wrong.

    That was also my experience, and the reason for which I kept a beard for about a decade. It looked wrong, but at least I didn't have to deal with the constant anguish of making it a tiny bit less wrong to be slapped with the fact that it wouldn't last, and that I couldn't do more about it.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on Jordan Peterson & The Meaning of Life | Philosophy Tube in ~humanities

    mftrhu Link Parent
    The science might be out there (and this applies to many, many, many things), but any given person: needs to know that it exists; needs to be willing to look for it; needs to know where to look...

    Why would you follow him when there is science out there on helping yourself now?

    The science might be out there (and this applies to many, many, many things), but any given person:

    1. needs to know that it exists;
    2. needs to be willing to look for it;
    3. needs to know where to look for it;
    4. needs to be able to understand it;
      1. and to realize when they are grossly misunderstanding it.

    Most people know (1). Some people are willing to sink their time in (2). But (3), (4), and (4.1)? They are not easy, even when the field you are dealing with is more-or-less settled, and not full of contradictory or apparently contradictory information.

    I'm just not seeing what the world would look like under a Peterson revolution

    Lobsters. Lobsters everywhere.

    7 votes
  9. Comment on What are you reading these days? #17 in ~books

    mftrhu Link
    After going through hundreds of fanfics, and dozens of millions of words, I am finally reading Worm.

    After going through hundreds of fanfics, and dozens of millions of words, I am finally reading Worm.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on People of Tildes, what apps and programs do you use regularly on your PC? in ~tech

    mftrhu Link
    Operating System I have been using Linux exclusively since June-July 2015. My laptop is currently running OpenSUSE, but the only reason I have not replaced it with Debian is because my files are...

    Operating System

    I have been using Linux exclusively since June-July 2015. My laptop is currently running OpenSUSE, but the only reason I have not replaced it with Debian is because my files are strewn around and I need to back them up.

    SUSE is not actually that bad, but - I don't use most of its features (e.g. snapper, yast), and I keep on struggling with packages. I can compile them from scratch well enough, but the instructions often have either Debian or Ubuntu in mind, and finding/compiling/installing the equivalent libraries can be a struggle.

    Desktop Environment

    I actually don't use a DE, having ditched it (Cinnamon) more than a year ago for i3wm with a mostly stock configuration. I use dunst as my notification daemon, and NetworkManager with nm-applet take care of the network on my laptop (but not on my netbook, where I'm just using wpa_supplicant).

    The first five i3 workspaces are named - 1:web, 2:im, 3:edit, 4:term, 5:misc.

    Web

    I used to use Firefox for my daily browsing. Since Quantum rolled in, though, my workflow has been disrupted thanks to both the old extensions being dropped, and to Firefox itself using up much more resources when a lot of tabs are open (despite the opposite being claimed).

    It's still hanging around my HDD, and I use it from time to time when dealing with a difficult website, but I do most of my browsing with Palemoon. I use Pentadactyl, Tree Style Tabs, uBlock Origin and NoScript with it.

    Browsing on the netbook

    My old 2011 netbook is still hanging around, and I use it from time to time (especially when I have to go out and/or don't feel like carrying a couple of kilos of effectively-desktop-bound-laptop around). It's actually not that slow for most things I want to do with it, except, of course, web browsing.

    With only 1 GB of RAM (to be shared with the rest of the system), most browsers are right out - except for very niche ones, like Dillo and NetSurf. They do not support JS, nor actually most CSS (NetSurf is the best one out of the two), but they are extremely lightweight and can handle dozens of tabs with a footprint which barely goes over 100 MB.

    Browsing on the command line

    This is related to the previous (sub-)section, but separate from it - I do a lot of my browsing/information retrieval right in the terminal. dict gives me access to dictionary servers, and translate-shell is very handy. I wrote (hacked up) my own script for doing quick searches, ddg.sh, and I often use reddit via rtv (the Reddit Terminal Viewer).

    Instant messaging

    I mostly use Telegram to keep in touch with friends and relatives (I don't know what god I have to thank for this, but basically all of my family is on it).

    I have been starting to use Discord recently, but I just use the web version unless I'm on my phone. I have a Matrix account, and I suppose that Riot should still be on my disk, but I don't really use it.

    Text editing

    I went from Notepad++ (early 2015) to Sublime Text (late 2015) to Emacs (2017), and I fell in love with the latter. I do most of my editing in it, and a few (many) more things besides.

    I do my journaling with it, and manage a personal, private wiki with org-mode.

    Document production

    I used to use Libre Office, but I gradually stopped, and nowadays I write most of my documents in either Markdown (if I think I might have to copy-paste them often) or Org-mode, going through LaTeX via either ox-latex or pandoc when I want a PDF.

    Terminal

    I use urxvt as my terminal emulator, and tmux as my terminal multiplexer.

    Other

    Password management

    I use KeePassX to manage my passwords.

    Document/reference management

    I use Zotero standalone to capture and organize web pages or papers I might want to refer to. Other material just sits under ~/Library, organized as per the universal decimal classification, with some slight tweaks: e.g., my computer science/programming books live under ~/Library/0.Science_and_Knowledge/04.Computer_science, and they all follow the same naming pattern ([First author's last name.][Year[-Month[-Day]].]Title.ext).

    File sync

    I use Syncthing to keep my files in sync across my laptop, netbook and phone. It works well enough, but it crashes and/or stops syncing often enough (once every few days) to be a bit of an hassle. I don't think I have lost any data so far, though.

    Other - other

    Too many other tools to count, often built ad-hoc with Python or hacked together with shell and awk, but this comment is already long enough without going in detail about them.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Folau set to be axed: Rugby Australia unable to contact Israel Folau following anti-gay post and intends to terminate his contract in ~lgbt

    mftrhu Link
    The last part is infuriating. He "learned to «love and forgive»" people for not agreeing with his backwards "gay people go to hell, repent your sin"? Can someone be more smug?

    In an interview last October, he told the Sydney Morning Herald he had enjoyed the off-field saga [the shitshow that followed his posts].

    [...]

    "Not that it happened on purpose, but my identity is based around my faith in God. And I truly believe that from deep down inside, what was happening off the field, even though it was challenging and it was hard, it was actually moulding me into the person [I am] ... and taught me a lot of things that I needed to learn, and I'm still learning now.

    "Obviously a lot of people will say negative things about what was happening, [his posts about gay people, amongst others, being destined for hell unless they "repent"] but it taught me to actually love and forgive them for obviously not agreeing and that's something that I've learnt to take on."

    The last part is infuriating. He "learned to «love and forgive»" people for not agreeing with his backwards "gay people go to hell, repent your sin"? Can someone be more smug?

  12. Comment on Move back to your dying hometown. Unless you can’t. in ~life

    mftrhu Link Parent
    And if your interests do not diverge too much from the interests of the people in that area - and divergence, here, might be something as trivial as "likes to read, not interested in sports". In a...

    If you're white, straight, cisgender and Christian maybe...

    And if your interests do not diverge too much from the interests of the people in that area - and divergence, here, might be something as trivial as "likes to read, not interested in sports". In a city you will probably find someone to talk/hang out with. Good luck doing that in a rural community, especially considering the fact that most don't have good public transport.

    They might be friendlier on the surface, but with a lot of rules and caveats and silly points of contention - e.g., "person X didn't greet me yesterday, what a stuck-up, fuck him" when X might just not have noticed them.

    And they are slower all-right, which is not a good thing - not when you need to add at least half a hour to get anywhere, or to buy something that you urgently need, or to get to the nearest hospital before you die.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on A new gun law banning all semi-automatic weapons used during the Christchurch terrorist attack, has passed its first reading. in ~news

    mftrhu Link Parent
    Yeah, the "if they want to kill someone they'll find a way" argument has always sounded fairly ridiculous to me. Sure. It's trivially true - if someone wants to kill people bad enough, they'll...

    trying to kill 50 people with a knife is much harder then trying to kill 50 people with a semi automatic weapon.

    Yeah, the "if they want to kill someone they'll find a way" argument has always sounded fairly ridiculous to me.

    Sure. It's trivially true - if someone wants to kill people bad enough, they'll manage.

    If gun control is not that strict they could even find a gun to do it! But they'd have to go out of their way for that, and they'd need more time and more money, and it would impose an hurdle which would discourage or stop less determined people.

    And if gun control is strict enough, if the only weapon they can't find is not even a pistol - let alone an automatic or semi-automatic rifle - but a knife, or a bat, that would limit their impact to a ridiculous degree.

    It might not completely eradicate these kinds of crimes, but no law can ever hope to do that, nor they aim at that - just reducing their incidence and impact is plenty.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What If We Detonated All Nuclear Bombs At Once? in ~misc

    mftrhu Link Parent
    You are very, very, very, very far from it. Geocide is pretty hard - It wouldn't even slag the crust, let alone actually shatter the planet - and give the pieces enough energy to keep on being...

    Earth would be no more, and the Moon will fuck off into space, 'cause guess what: nuclear weaponry is hardcore.

    How close am I?

    You are very, very, very, very far from it. Geocide is pretty hard -

    Destroying the Earth is harder than you may have been led to believe.

    You've seen the action movies where the bad guy threatens to destroy the Earth. You've heard people on the news claiming that the next nuclear war or cutting down rainforests or persisting in releasing hideous quantities of pollution into the atmosphere threatens to end the world.

    Fools.

    The Earth is built to last. It is a 4,550,000,000-year-old, 5,973,600,000,000,000,000,000-tonne ball of iron. It has taken more devastating asteroid hits in its lifetime than you've had hot dinners, and lo, it still orbits merrily. So my first piece of advice to you, dear would-be Earth-destroyer, is: do NOT think this will be easy.

    It wouldn't even slag the crust, let alone actually shatter the planet - and give the pieces enough energy to keep on being shattered. We might go the way of the dinosaurs (likely not), but it wouldn't even kill off all life - large asteroids carry with them much more energy than any piddly nuclear firecracker (if producing less fallout).

    Kinetic bombardment is a weapon of mass destruction - you might have heard of the "rods from god", or Project Thor, and even if carrying "only" the equivalent energy of 11.5 tons of TNT the rods would be just 9 tons of tungsten moving at ~4 km/s. An asteroid not only would be faster, but orders of magnitude more massive: the Chicxulub impactor, also known as "the big ass rock that killed the dinosaurs", left behind a 150-km wide crater, its mass being estimated between the one thousand and 460 thousands billions of tons, and that? That was not the biggest impact that our planet survived.

    It would be very loud, though.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on Megathread: April Fools' Day 2019 on the internet in ~misc

    mftrhu Link
    It looks like they put it back already, but I found Devuan's April's fool to be quite amusing - they replaced their homepage with the ASCII-art logo of a "green hat hackers group", with some text...

    It looks like they put it back already, but I found Devuan's April's fool to be quite amusing - they replaced their homepage with the ASCII-art logo of a "green hat hackers group", with some text on the side going

    THE WEB SUCKS -- JAVASCRIPT SUCKS -- BROWSERS SUCK
    GOPHER IS THE WAY -- GOPHER IS THE FUTURE
    ******       DEVUAN.ORG HAS BEEN PWNED       ******
    WE TURNED ALL DEVUAN'S SHITTY WEBSITES INTO PROPER GOPHERHOLES
    

    Others found it less amusing, and thought that the Devuan website got actually hacked.

    The gopherholes, BTW, are still online - if you don't have a gopher client, just do printf "\n" | nc www.devuan.org 70 | sed 's/.\([^\t]*\).*/\1/g' to check it out.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on How do people tend to perceive you, versus how you perceive yourself? in ~talk

    mftrhu Link Parent
    Mine have just been ignoring the whole thing for the last... three years, now, and it honestly suits me just fine. When they tried to "talk" about it the only thing they ever did was ignoring what...

    Mine have just been ignoring the whole thing for the last... three years, now, and it honestly suits me just fine. When they tried to "talk" about it the only thing they ever did was ignoring what I was saying - or dismissing it as my "being too clever", "being too sure of myself" - to try to scare me away from pursuing HRT.

    I'm not even sure why I expected better from them - even just getting myself heard about things as trivial as not wanting cheese on pasta, or wanting to wear long sleeves in summer, have been a struggle growing up, so why should it have been different for my gender?

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Facebook announces a ban on praise, support and representation of white nationalism and separatism on Facebook and Instagram in ~tech

    mftrhu Link Parent
    I actually don't find it that weird, not on HN at least - it's run by a start-up incubator, it's very focused on economic success, and the people who gravitate there tend to be of the "temporarily...

    there's really not a lot to me that would suggest it should be a breeding ground for the bizarre, crypto-reactionary libertarianism that tends to actually dominate such spaces in practice and also seems to be shockingly common among silicon valley CEOs,

    I actually don't find it that weird, not on HN at least - it's run by a start-up incubator, it's very focused on economic success, and the people who gravitate there tend to be of the "temporarily embarrassed billionaire" and/or rabidly capitalistic, "pull yourself by your bootstraps" sort.

    2 votes
  18. Comment on What does the word 'civilized' mean to you? Can it be used to compare and contrast socities and cultures? in ~talk

    mftrhu Link
    I frankly have no idea what "civilized" would even refer to. Is it technological progress? If so, in which areas? Is the fact that this progress is made available to its citizens? Is it having...

    Do you believe that some cultures/societies are more 'civilized' than others? What is your definition of 'civilized' / what does it mean to be 'civilized'?

    I frankly have no idea what "civilized" would even refer to.

    Is it technological progress? If so, in which areas? Is the fact that this progress is made available to its citizens? Is it having good relationships with the neighbors? Is it the treatment of one's citizens? How about the treatment of foreigners and minorities? If so, in which areas?

    Because the way people use it is all over the board,

    Is it a colonialistic-type term used to promote a higher sense of placement in the world that should be abolished. Does it have any merit in its use? If so, what do you think makes a civilized group of people and does one exist?

    And it's more often than not used in a nebulous way on purpose, in a very colonialistic and/or nationalistic manner, commonly not in good faith - "Islam is bad, they stone them gays", coming from people who are otherwise opposed to LGBT+ rights, comes to mind. Bad faith is pretty much certain when "savages" is used.

    If I had to define "civilized", I'd probably settle on "actually gives all people equal rights", and every single country currently existing would fall short of that.

    7 votes
  19. Comment on Facebook announces a ban on praise, support and representation of white nationalism and separatism on Facebook and Instagram in ~tech

    mftrhu Link Parent
    Same. I avoid political threads on there like the plague, because the comments in those are absolutely ridiculous - it feels even worse than Reddit, at times. "The Daily Stormer is just a...

    Same. I avoid political threads on there like the plague, because the comments in those are absolutely ridiculous - it feels even worse than Reddit, at times. "The Daily Stormer is just a political website, should political sites really be banned for having wrong think? [...] I'd rather find my son reading The Daily Stormer than sex ed when he is 10"

    Medicine, too. "My friend has depression, she had it for a long time" - cue three people chiming in and being upvoted for "put her on a zero-carb diet", and I always end up headdesking and backing out of the thread when I see shit like that.

    4 votes
  20. Comment on Which messenger(s) do you currently use? If you had your preference, what single messaging service would you prefer to use? in ~talk

    mftrhu Link Parent
    It's very much not an oxymoron. FOSS refers to the source code of the software itself. Encryption only concerns itself with the data that the software handles. Encryption (the algorithm) is part...

    In an ideal world something that was FOSS with end to end encryption would be used by everyone. So I guess Signal is the closest thing? I am not a software person, so it might be an oxymoron to be FOSS and encrypted (i.e. I don't understand if you would have to make your encryption public to be open source?).

    It's very much not an oxymoron. FOSS refers to the source code of the software itself. Encryption only concerns itself with the data that the software handles. Encryption (the algorithm) is part of the software, too, and it should definitely be open source for the software as a whole to be considered FOSS.

    If you are worried about the encryption being open-source weakening it, don't be. Security through obscurity is no security at all - and having the code out in the open allows people to actually check on it, at the very least see how it's put together and from what and if the encryption system being used is not homebrewed. It being closed source won't stop bad actors from getting access to it, not if it also has to run on their devices.

    2 votes