19 votes

What's the weather/climate like where you live?

A pretty light-hearted/whimsical question.

I'll start.

Over here in São Paulo City temperatures range from anywhere from 10-30 degrees and the climate tends to be more rainy in the summer (the end/beginning of the year as in the southern hemisphere, which makes stuff like christmas really odd) and less so in the winter, which often leads to pretty beautiful sunsets. Sometimes the rain comes with pretty heavy wind in what looks like a diet hurricane. The clouds are mostly cumulus in the summer. I don't think it has ever snown here.

39 comments

  1. ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    South of Western Siberia, which is apparently pretty close to Alaskan climate. It's very cold in the winter and very hot in the summer. Last winter was awfully tame at −15°C, with maybe a week of...

    South of Western Siberia, which is apparently pretty close to Alaskan climate. It's very cold in the winter and very hot in the summer.

    Last winter was awfully tame at −15°C, with maybe a week of the regular Siberian cold at −30°C. Snow wasn't particularly deep: only about 1.5m accumulated on the sides of the pathways. It was mostly cloudy, with rare clear skies.

    It's the end of May, and it's unevenly hot, with days shifting anywhere between 21°C and 29°C. It's likely going to get even hotter, crossing the 30°C threshold, but unlikely to get to 35°C. Cloudy days have been rare so far, and everything looks particularly dull when those arrive, though it does shine when it's sunny.

    It's generally rather humid here, so hot winters are also sweaty. There's enough mosquitos here: rather few and far apart in the city, but a lot in the middle of the day in the countryside. As summer grows, there's going to be a lot of flies around, too.

    12 votes
  2. [7]
    stu2b50
    Link
    The fairly unique consistent 60-70 F (15 - 21 C) of the Bay, shared by only two others parts in the world. Coming from the southern US, where it's humid and hot during much of the year, it's...

    The fairly unique consistent 60-70 F (15 - 21 C) of the Bay, shared by only two others parts in the world. Coming from the southern US, where it's humid and hot during much of the year, it's honestly kinda amazing. It's like there's always AC, outside. Consistent room temperature, outside, all throughout the year.

    Despite PGE's terrible service and prices, my electricity bill is usually like 10-15 dollars a month, since I typically neither heat nor cool my place, so it's really just the refrigerator.

    It can be a little chilly. The infamous Mark Twain quote is "The coldest winter I ever saw was the summer I spent in San Francisco".

    And yeah it's really foggy sometimes, especially on the peninsula.

    11 votes
    1. [2]
      MimicSquid
      Link Parent
      Today in particular it's intolerably hot, being all of 85F (30 C.)

      Today in particular it's intolerably hot, being all of 85F (30 C.)

      8 votes
      1. teaearlgraycold
        Link Parent
        At least our heat waves are few and far between. I see we’re back to normal later this week.

        At least our heat waves are few and far between. I see we’re back to normal later this week.

        1 vote
    2. [4]
      teaearlgraycold
      Link Parent
      What are the two other parts of the world that share our climate?

      What are the two other parts of the world that share our climate?

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        stu2b50
        Link Parent
        I believe it's an area in northern Portugal and an area in southern Australia. IIRC the classification is cool summer Mediterranean. The climate would be most of the Mediterranean, but it's...

        I believe it's an area in northern Portugal and an area in southern Australia.

        IIRC the classification is cool summer Mediterranean. The climate would be most of the Mediterranean, but it's unusually cool due to the cold pacific currents that pass through the titular SF Bay.

        6 votes
        1. Crocodile
          Link Parent
          Yep, that is correct! Among others. See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediterranean_climate#Warm-summer_Mediterranean_climate Also here is a good map of the few locations in the world with...

          Yep, that is correct! Among others. See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediterranean_climate#Warm-summer_Mediterranean_climate

          Also here is a good map of the few locations in the world with this great climate: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Koppen-Geiger_Map_Csb_present.svg

          4 votes
      2. skybrian
        Link Parent
        Maybe some part of South Africa? At least according to half-remembered stuff from botanical gardens about what plants grow.

        Maybe some part of South Africa? At least according to half-remembered stuff from botanical gardens about what plants grow.

        3 votes
  3. [4]
    ohyran
    Link
    I live in Gothenburg, Sweden. Its mostly rainy, foggy, and a very unique form of brutal cold during winters. Due to the high humidity its really nasty and the closeness to the Gulf Stream means...

    I live in Gothenburg, Sweden. Its mostly rainy, foggy, and a very unique form of brutal cold during winters. Due to the high humidity its really nasty and the closeness to the Gulf Stream means that its fairly warmish (like most of Scandinavia)

    If you like moist endless forests? foggeddaboudit! We got you covered. Moss and lichen covered rock? Its here! You like an ocean who's lashing winds never end, whipping the barren rocky shores and islands with its patches of storm ridden stumpy trees creating a howl of madness and sorrow? Oooh baby, where have you been? You enjoy long winters, darkness and a sense of cruel apathy towards the brutality of life brought upon by the shared understanding that the universe is finite and all endeavors of man, no matter how well thought out will all end as shards in the hollow void - there's hotels you can stay in here!

    According to wikipedia the Average Daily mean is between -1 to +17 celsius depending on the time of year. The oppressive climate of ennui is stable year around.

    Welcome to Gothenburg! A pearl. Or at least some crud stuck inside a living mollusc.

    /Gothenburg Tourist Board.

    11 votes
    1. [2]
      Internet
      Link Parent
      I think you're being a bit unfair about the weather of Gothenburg. I've been living here since I was born and always enjoyed the weather here, the frequent rain here is quite calming. One...

      I think you're being a bit unfair about the weather of Gothenburg. I've been living here since I was born and always enjoyed the weather here, the frequent rain here is quite calming. One exception would be our weak winters though, sleet is not even slightly enjoyable.

      6 votes
      1. ohyran
        Link Parent
        Haha yeah - it was ment as "a bit" tongue in cheek. Its OK I've lived here for about 20 years and I mean in all honesty I chose to live here 😃

        Haha yeah - it was ment as "a bit" tongue in cheek.
        Its OK I've lived here for about 20 years and I mean in all honesty I chose to live here 😃

        3 votes
    2. Silbern
      Link Parent
      Absolutely poetic!

      a sense of cruel apathy towards the brutality of life brought upon by the shared understanding that the universe is finite and all endeavors of man, no matter how well thought out will all end as shards in the hollow void

      Absolutely poetic!

      1 vote
  4. DrStone
    Link
    Currently southeast Asia. A "tropical rainforest climate" despite not being a rainforest. No distinct temperature seasons. There's a few monsoon months, and a haze month or two thanks to countries...

    Currently southeast Asia. A "tropical rainforest climate" despite not being a rainforest.
    No distinct temperature seasons. There's a few monsoon months, and a haze month or two thanks to countries in the region using slash-and-burn. Counting days, it rains about half the year, with almost all of those days being thunderstorms. Average high of 31C / 88F, low of 25C / 77F, with average humidity of 80%. It was a comically large news event, with people going crazy how "freezing" it was, when lows dropped to the low 20s C / high-60s-low-70s F for a few days. Meanwhile, I have not stopped sweating since moving to this geographic steam room since electricity is too expensive to run AC 24/7.

    I miss having seasons, both for comfort and for the sense of passing time.

    9 votes
  5. [10]
    hamstergeddon
    Link
    Converting F to C is a PITA, so I'll just use words instead :D Here in SE Pennsylvania, US it was unusually mild this past winter and it's been unusually cool this spring, although we're starting...

    Converting F to C is a PITA, so I'll just use words instead :D Here in SE Pennsylvania, US it was unusually mild this past winter and it's been unusually cool this spring, although we're starting to see warmer temps here and there. Soon we'll consistently be warm (with some god-awful HOT HOT HOT days peppered in) until October or so when it'll start being cool again. Then the cycle repeats.

    I've always lived within 50 miles (80 km) of here, so I've only ever known experiencing all of the seasons. They're usually pretty mild and we rarely have intense winters and unbearable summers. Little bit jealous of the person who said they live in SF with their $15 power bill. Because of the seasonal nature of our temps and the age of my house we pay quite a lot ot heat/cool it. Oil heat and window AC units are what we're stuck with, sadly. On the upside, oil prices tanking recently helped us out a lot as we were able to fill our oil tank for around $200 when it's usually $500+

    7 votes
    1. [2]
      devkin
      Link Parent
      Doesn’t help that Southeast PA loves to let you experience every season within a week. You’re always stuck pondering whether it is worth it to keep the air/heat on during the random extreme days,...

      Doesn’t help that Southeast PA loves to let you experience every season within a week. You’re always stuck pondering whether it is worth it to keep the air/heat on during the random extreme days, or if you just foot the bill to be comfy.

      4 votes
      1. hamstergeddon
        Link Parent
        Yeah for real. Then there are days where my AC and heat are both running in the same day because it's cold out in the morning, scorching hot by sundown, then cold again at night. And sometimes...

        Yeah for real. Then there are days where my AC and heat are both running in the same day because it's cold out in the morning, scorching hot by sundown, then cold again at night. And sometimes they compete with each other because I'm forgetful and I was spoiled by growing up in a house with central air/heat controlled by a single thermostat.

        1 vote
    2. [6]
      mrbig
      Link Parent
      If Tildes ever get bots (and I’m not saying it should, nor wish to discuss it here...), a metric/imperial converter would be useful.

      Converting F to C is a PITA

      If Tildes ever get bots (and I’m not saying it should, nor wish to discuss it here...), a metric/imperial converter would be useful.

      3 votes
      1. [5]
        Algernon_Asimov
        Link Parent
        Or people could just use the international standard to start with, so noone needs to convert from the old measure to the new. :)

        Or people could just use the international standard to start with, so noone needs to convert from the old measure to the new. :)

        3 votes
        1. [4]
          mrbig
          Link Parent
          Yes of course, that would be great. But it's understandable for people to be used to what they were taught. And the formula for Fahrenheit to Celsius is not practical for mental calculation.

          Yes of course, that would be great. But it's understandable for people to be used to what they were taught. And the formula for Fahrenheit to Celsius is not practical for mental calculation.

          4 votes
          1. [3]
            UniquelyGeneric
            Link Parent
            The NYC subway can be used as a method for quick mental calculation between Fahrenheit and Celsius, but admittedly it's only a novelty I discovered after moving here, and most New Yorkers probably...

            The NYC subway can be used as a method for quick mental calculation between Fahrenheit and Celsius, but admittedly it's only a novelty I discovered after moving here, and most New Yorkers probably couldn't recite all the stops on the 6 train so it's of limited use.

            2 votes
            1. [2]
              mrbig
              Link Parent
              Twitter doesn’t let me see it without an account. The internet is sure getting worse!

              Twitter doesn’t let me see it without an account. The internet is sure getting worse!

              1. UniquelyGeneric
                Link Parent
                What a shame, I linked it because I figured it would be the most commonly accessible link. Social media building up moats around their walled gardens I suppose... Here's another site that shows...

                What a shame, I linked it because I figured it would be the most commonly accessible link. Social media building up moats around their walled gardens I suppose...

                Here's another site that shows the same thing.

    3. spit-evil-olive-tips
      Link Parent
      Complete tangent, but...the way to do it isn't to learn the conversion formula (the one that involves multiplying by 5/9ths...or is it 9/5ths? and then adding 32...or is it subtracting?) Instead...

      Complete tangent, but...the way to do it isn't to learn the conversion formula (the one that involves multiplying by 5/9ths...or is it 9/5ths? and then adding 32...or is it subtracting?)

      Instead of converting, learn to think in Celsius:

      0 C == 32 F

      10 C == 50 F

      20 C == 68 F

      30 C == 86 F

      40 C == 104 F

      That 0 to 40 range covers most "normal" weather, so if you can memorize those 5 points, then approximation becomes much easier. 20 is on the cool end of room temperature, 30 is a fairly hot summer day (at least where I am) so 25 C is just about perfect weather. Since 5 C == 9 F, if you have those multiples of ten memorized, you can easily convert the halfway point (25 C == 68 + 9 F = 77 F). And meanwhile, 10 C == 18 F, so you can easily figure out other adjacent multiple-of-ten temperatures, such as -10 or 50 C.

      2 votes
  6. knocklessmonster
    Link
    Southern California. The legends are true. Sunny, warm, no rain most of the time. We get 45F (7C) to 60(15C) in the coldest winter, 60F (15) to 90(32) in the summer, typically, but we'll get...

    Southern California. The legends are true. Sunny, warm, no rain most of the time. We get 45F (7C) to 60(15C) in the coldest winter, 60F (15) to 90(32) in the summer, typically, but we'll get spikes up to110+ (43), typically from August to October.

    The thing nobody talks about are the Santa Ana Winds. They're katabatic winds that come from the desert, descend from the mountains and cook us through late fall and winter. If we get the winds, it'll be somewhere around 80-90F (26-32C) during the day, maybe ten degrees cooler at night, and they tend to bring forest fires after drying everything out. They'll also kick up a ton of dust, and make the place smell horribly, if your nose isn't too dry to smell.

    7 votes
  7. [3]
    mrbig
    (edited )
    Link
    Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. It’s a tropical climate. We live in a state that many Tilderinos might consider a persistent summer with a strong rain season. The lowest temperature registered in...

    Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. It’s a tropical climate. We live in a state that many Tilderinos might consider a persistent summer with a strong rain season. The lowest temperature registered in Salvador was 16°C, but it's usually way higher than that, between 25°C and 35°C. The humidity makes it feel even hotter. Many people wear jackets at 21°C, especially when it's windy. I live close to the sea so there's always a very welcome breeze (that also fucks up my electronics). The very notion of really feeling cold is considered somewhat inaccessible, only in southern states and for those that travel abroad. The Chapada Diamantina is a mountainous region of Bahia where people go to eat fondue, wear coats, and feel fancy.

    6 votes
    1. [2]
      Greg
      Link Parent
      I love the idea of eating fondue in Brazil. It's one of those little things that seems very appealingly incongruous.

      The Chapada Diamantina is a mountainous region of Bahia where people go to eat fondue, wear coats, and feel fancy.

      I love the idea of eating fondue in Brazil. It's one of those little things that seems very appealingly incongruous.

      4 votes
      1. mrbig
        Link Parent
        Brazil is a big country. We have the largest Japanese colony outside of Japan, cities in which German is the official language and snow in the far south.

        Brazil is a big country. We have the largest Japanese colony outside of Japan, cities in which German is the official language and snow in the far south.

        6 votes
  8. Silbern
    Link
    Southern Honolulu, reporting in! It's pretty much what you expect in the movies. The temperature is freakishly consistent here - winters usually have an average daytime temp of 80F (26C), and...

    Southern Honolulu, reporting in! It's pretty much what you expect in the movies. The temperature is freakishly consistent here - winters usually have an average daytime temp of 80F (26C), and summers around 86-88F (30C). During the winter, there's often a cold spell of 3 or 4 weeks where it'll drop to around 60F (15.5C), but it's totally dependant on the winds whether or jot we get it. This year, we didn't, and the summer so far has been unusually cool. As I write this, there's so heavy clouds in the air, which is pretty uncommon for almost being June.

    Honolulu gets a fair amount of precipitation, but it's very concentrated. It almost never rains in our dry season (May through October) beyond extremely brief light sprinkles, and a good chunk of winter is dry too. When it does rain though, oh boy does it rain. Winter's storms can bring flash floods, avalanches, and demolish small trees on occasion, and it can feel like the air itself is turning into water.

    Because the temperature is so warm on average here, Honolulu maintains a very green look all year round. Nearly all of our plants are evergreens, and even those that shed their leaves, like the famous Plumeria trees, only do so for a month or two at most before sprouting their leaves again. It's a real problem if you like to grow most seasonal plants - you'll have to simulate a proper winter for them, or they'll eventually die.

    Even though get get strong storms on occasion, Honolulu almost never sees hurricanes. The long trail of slowed down water to our south usually saps the energy from most hurricanes that try to approach, and the Ko'olau mountains (the eastern ones you see in all the pictures) are tall enough to block the force of some that try to approach from the north or east. Very ocassionally we'll get one that hits, like the infamous Hurricane Iniki of 1992, but it's very rare. Honolulu is pretty safe from a natural disasters standpoint, so long as you don't live in a flood plain.

    From an air quality perspective, Honolulu's is really clean, especially for a city its size. It's the second cleanest in the country from particle pollution, and tied for first for lowest ozone emissions, we never have unsafe ozone levels. This is due to a combination of the winds blowing of all any accumulated pollution, strict environmental regulations, and a relative lack of trucking or heavy commercial equipment.

    It should be noted that everything I've said applies only to the southern shore area. Hawaii's famous for its intensely varied microclimates, and Oahu (the island Hawaii's on) is no exception. If you go to the north or the east, the rainy and dry seasons are flipped, with summer being wet and winter being intermittent. It's extremely cloudy on the eastern and northern sides of the Hawaiian islands; Hilo for example, a city on the eastern side of the Big Island, is the rainiest city in the entire US, and one of the rainiest in the world. It sees only about 60 days of full sun a year, making it cloudier than Seattle, Hamburg, London, and tons of other cities famous for their cloud cover. Not usually the image people have when they think of Hawaii :) the effect is a lot less pronounced on Oahu because our mountains are far smaller, but it's still there.

    The central Pacific is a really interesting part of the world, and that includes its unique weather patterns. It's a really good place to live and I'm glad I've gotten the opportunity. But with Coronavirus causing us to have 40+% unemployment, times are tough here now...

    6 votes
  9. UniquelyGeneric
    (edited )
    Link
    NYC is around my ideal climate. I grew up in LA, and didn't appreciate how special it is to have every day be 72 and sunny. I lived in upstate NY to understand what a cold and long winter looks...

    NYC is around my ideal climate. I grew up in LA, and didn't appreciate how special it is to have every day be 72 and sunny. I lived in upstate NY to understand what a cold and long winter looks like, and I did Florida long enough to realize that I cannot stand humidity (perhaps from the dry heat in SoCal), so I ended up moving to NYC.

    New York has relatively mild Winters, hovering around freezing temperature, with a few storms that will drop enough snow to transform it into a "Winter Wonderland" of pure snow, before inevitably turning into a brown/grey mush that you have to dodge while walking about.

    The Summers are somewhat humid, peaking in the 80s F (~25-30 C), which can get a bit muggy when commuting to work. The skyscrapers and subways themselves trap in heat on the island of Manhattan, which is appreciated in the winter, but a bit too intense in the summer. You find yourself walking on the side of streets that have shade wherever you go. Occasionally a heat wave may push things into the 90s F (~32-37 C), but this isn't frequent or long lasting.

    The Spring and Fall, though, they're my favorite. Particularly the trees in the Fall. The weather is a cool 60-75 F (~15-25 C), and in Fall there's a calm undercurrent where the city feels more relaxed. The trees turn color in October (as opposed to September upstate), and I find their earth tones particularly striking against the brownstone apartments and other urban color schemes. You can also wear many layers in Fall which provides for greater flexibility of attire.

    In general, New Yorkers try to leave the city during Summer, but given the quarantine, we're probably going to stick it out here. Today was ~75 F (~25 C) and partly cloudy, so perfect for cycling and reading a book in the park, which is what I did :)

    5 votes
  10. intuxikated
    Link
    I am from south India (Kerala) its generally hot here with high humidity. Tempratures reach high as 35C in summer and can go down to 20 - 25C in winter, our normal temperature is 30C. In the past...

    I am from south India (Kerala) its generally hot here with high humidity. Tempratures reach high as 35C in summer and can go down to 20 - 25C in winter, our normal temperature is 30C. In the past couple of years there has been some drastic changes in our wheather pattern, thanks to climate change. Our summer temperature has been shot up to 40 - 42C, winter temperatures go as low as 17C, we have had floods in the fall for past 2 years and we are expecting one in this fall as well.

    Floods (2018, 2019) are the new normal to our wheather pattern, People cant do anything at this point, Govt is helpless... we dont have enough money or infrastructure to endure recurring floods like this. Sad part of all this is that the state is one of least pollting state in the country. only 52 out of 280 cities pass India government’s own standards of air pollution that say PM10 shouldn’t exceed 60 micrograms per cubic meter and all our 14 cities are on the list.

    This is not the case for all of Kerala there are regions like Munnar which is colder for the most part of an year.

    5 votes
  11. CALICO
    Link
    Currently I live in Kandahar, Afghanistan. It's 40°C/104°F this week during the day, and about 20°C/68°F in the evenings. Low chance of any rain this time of year, but it happens. Rarely, and not...

    Currently I live in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
    It's 40°C/104°F this week during the day, and about 20°C/68°F in the evenings. Low chance of any rain this time of year, but it happens. Rarely, and not for very long when it does. Next week we'll see highs of 45°C/113°F, and it should hover between 40–45°C for the next several months. Very low humidity, and very dusty & windy most days.
    Winter went below freezing temperatures in the mornings, and usually hovered right around freezing during the days. We saw a little sprinkle of snow this winter, which is pretty rare in this part of the country. A lot of rain at the tail-end of winter/beginning of spring. So much rain. Oh god, the rain. The mud. Other than the rain, it's pretty comfortable in the spring. Light jacket/T-shirt kind of weather.

    Last year I lived in Kuwait. Which is hot. Hot-hot. And humid. We're talking 90%+ humid throughout the whole summer. In July we experienced the world's highest temperatures, at 52.2°C/126°F in the shade and 63°C/145°F in the sun. It wasn't much better at night. I spent about six-months in Kuwait, and I don't think it dropped below 40°C high's that whole time. Nights were no less than 26°C/78.8°F. Dust was worse than Afghanistan, with none of the wind. The sky was almost a constant haze, and cast a beige glow over everything.
    I don't know what the other half of the year is like.

    I spent some time in Qatar late-summer. It was a little better than Kuwait.

    Not counting about two-weeks in October in the US, I've been in the Middle East for over a year now. If I have my way, I'll be here to the end of 2020. I haven't decided where my next job will be yet. I might stay somewhere in the region, or go back to DC. I miss cold. I'm not meant for the heat.

    5 votes
  12. krg
    Link
    Southern California, so...pretty close to ideal (for many). It's been fairly warm as of late, but also nice and breezy. Can't complain! Well, I won't until we get into the triple-digits in a few...

    Southern California, so...pretty close to ideal (for many). It's been fairly warm as of late, but also nice and breezy. Can't complain! Well, I won't until we get into the triple-digits in a few months...

    4 votes
  13. Greg
    Link
    London here, and today it's a beautiful 24ºC and sunny with a very light breeze. We generally sit within about 3-10ºC in winter and 15-26ºC in summer, with spring and autumn roughly halfway...

    London here, and today it's a beautiful 24ºC and sunny with a very light breeze. We generally sit within about 3-10ºC in winter and 15-26ºC in summer, with spring and autumn roughly halfway between, but it can spike above 35 and below -10 at the extremes. We're seeing summer heatwaves in the 30s more and more, and I'm surprised that most newly built/refurbished houses still don't have AC - it's not an absolute necessity, but we're definitely heading in the direction where it's worth having.

    It's really not as rainy as people seem to think, but a general grey cloud cover is pretty standard throughout a lot of the year, and in combination with the surprisingly short days in winter it can feel a bit bleak. The stereotype that Brits will be outside acting as if we're in a tropical paradise at the first glimmer of sunshine is absolutely accurate - it's only lockdown keeping the crowds at bay over the last few days!

    Personally, I'm all about the sunshine and warmth; the posts about Hawaii and Southern California here are calling to me in a very real way.

    3 votes
  14. rogue_cricket
    Link
    Some of y'all live where it's so temperate! Gotta admit, I'm a bit jealous. I'm Canadian, so every temperature will be in Celsius. :) I live in a shallow river valley on the East coast of Canada...

    Some of y'all live where it's so temperate! Gotta admit, I'm a bit jealous.

    I'm Canadian, so every temperature will be in Celsius. :)

    I live in a shallow river valley on the East coast of Canada and we're known for having some of the snowiest winters in the country. Generally our first snow fall is in November and the last one can be as late as May, although April is usually when most of it melts. This year's winter wasn't that bad, but the last two years before that we had snowbanks that were almost as tall as the street signs.

    Summers are kind of nice if a bit short. Mostly in the mid 20s. Anything hotter than 30 degrees celsius feels WAY too hot to me but I have friends who would disagree. The hottest temperature I've ever been out in was I think 39 degrees celsius 5-10 years ago.

    One thing I do like about living here is that seasons are pretty clearly delineated. Spring, summer, fall, and winter are all distinct parts of the year and each have their own nice things (although I'm not sold on Spring entirely). I like watching the plants cycle every year - timing things by the blooms of tulips and daffodils and rhododendrons, then progressing through the flowering of crabapple trees, lilac bushes, day lillies. Fall here is also gorgeous; my city is covered in trees and surrounded by forest so the views you get from the top of the valley are really nice once the weather starts to cool down.

    Another thing I like: I feel pretty safe from mother nature here. We get some mild flooding sometimes in the spring and sometimes the tail end of a hurricane or an ice storm will take out the power for a day, maybe a few days if you're rural. But no earthquakes, tidal waves, tornadoes, and no venomous critters.

    I think my ideal climate is probably on the West coast of Canada, but it's pretty expensive to live there. :(

    3 votes
  15. Evox
    Link
    I live in Australia where it can be rainy one day and 40c+ the next right now its a cold month can't stand the Hot myself but the climate is always up and down can take that for the best or worst.

    I live in Australia where it can be rainy one day and 40c+ the next right now its a cold month can't stand the Hot myself but the climate is always up and down can take that for the best or worst.

    2 votes
  16. patience_limited
    (edited )
    Link
    Reporting in from northwestern lower Michigan, USA, 45° N latitude. We're about the same latitude as Minneapolis, MN, but lake effects buffer the temperatures considerably. It's extremely...

    Reporting in from northwestern lower Michigan, USA, 45° N latitude. We're about the same latitude as Minneapolis, MN, but lake effects buffer the temperatures considerably.

    It's extremely temperate here; within the past ten days, the temperature has swung from 3°C to 32°C during the daytime. Typical January average temperature is around -15°C; July temperatures spike up to 35°C. That's accompanied by a very large change in daylight length - anywhere from 7 to 14 hours at the solstices.

    It's hard to predict what the exact weather will be in any given one-kilometer radius, because there are hill, water, forest, and wind microclimates producing their own variations. We've seen +/- 2°C variations between the entrance of our subdivision and our house.

    As to precipitation, typical annual snowfall is around 2.5 meters; total rainfall about 0.8 meters. It's often cloudy and damp. The past couple of years, total precipitation has been higher than usual, and the levels of the surrounding Great Lakes are making the news. [The Midland dam failures are halfway down the Lower Peninsula of the state, but we're seeing lakefront wash away, and the local water treatment plant backing up.]. Other than heavy snow- and rainfalls, there's not much severe weather on land (no hurricanes, monsoons, typhoons, or tornadoes).

    It's never been safe to plant anything tender before Memorial Day, and the growing season only extends from now until late September at best. Spring is a three-week period where everything explodes into leaf and bloom; fall is similarly accelerated.

    And yet, it's an absolutely glorious place to live - there are options for outdoor activity in all four seasons. I've lived and worked in many places throughout the U.S., and there's nowhere I'd rather be.

    2 votes
  17. emnii
    Link
    I came from the US midwest. Summers are too hot and humid. Winters are too cold and dry. The seasons between are too short because the temperature flips from too hot to too cold very quickly and...

    I came from the US midwest. Summers are too hot and humid. Winters are too cold and dry. The seasons between are too short because the temperature flips from too hot to too cold very quickly and vice versa. When it rains, it's probably storming. The year before I moved, my basement was constantly wet. Either the snow would build and melt and freeze and melt and dribble into my basement, or the storms would come so often that my yard was constantly saturated.

    I'm in the US Pacific Northwest. I've lived here for a year. It's my perfect climate. The winter wasn't all that cold (very few days below 32F) and the summer wasn't all that hot (very few days over 80F). Low humidity, even on hot days. It's fascinating how few storms I've seen here. When thunder peals, it causes a flurry of local Facebook/Nextdoor posts. "Hope you like rain," is what my former boss said when I told him I was leaving to move to this area. My SO and I still laugh about it. Sure, January was a wet month, but the overall wetness is overblown. Some light rain here and there is pleasant compared to the alternative. The seasons feel like smooth, gradual transitions rather than midwest switch flips.

    I'm not moving back. I'll probably live in this region until I die.

    2 votes
  18. flanew
    Link
    I live in Bangalore, India. The weather currently consists of recurrent pre-monsoon showers every evening. The summer here is during the months of March to May, since the monsoon arrives in June,...

    I live in Bangalore, India. The weather currently consists of recurrent pre-monsoon showers every evening. The summer here is during the months of March to May, since the monsoon arrives in June, changing weather drastically. During summer the average daily highs are usually 32-36 degrees (C), with the hottest temperature recorded ever being ~38 degrees. Average daily lows during summer gets to around 26-28 degrees (C) by the early mornings.

    Although, now since we're experiencing pre-monsoon showers on a daily basis, the temperature barely crosses into 30 degrees even during day and often goes as low as 21 (C) at night. It's been a week since the supposed pre-monsoon showers began. The winds during the rain are really crazy. Bangalore also lies near the highest point of elevation on the Mysore Plateau, which moderates its temperature making it substantially cooler than the plain areas a little further away. While I'm on it, the monsoon is also being expected to arrive in coastal Kerala by tomorrow, so we should experiencing proper monsoon rains here in Bangalore in a few days lol.

    During winter the temperature decreases to daily highs of around 23-25 degrees (C), and lows of 15-17 degrees (C). It doesn't get any colder except for perhaps a handful of days when the temperature reaches ~13 degrees (C). It gets to dense fogs in the mornings and sometimes rarely, evenings too. Bangalore isn't very humid too. It's never too hot, and I can always survive without an AC, and it isn't too cold either, like at my relatives' places in Himachal, where they're forced to use a heater during the winter months. I love the weather here personally.

    1 vote