25 votes

What editor/IDE do you use?

How fast do you think it is and what are your reasons to use it?

55 comments

  1. [7]
    Bauke
    Link
    I've used Visual Studio Code for a while now and really like it. It's got great integration with the languages I use and the ecosystem is very nice, for anything that's not supported out of the...

    I've used Visual Studio Code for a while now and really like it. It's got great integration with the languages I use and the ecosystem is very nice, for anything that's not supported out of the box there's usually an extension that does a great job. And the extensions system has been improving too, a relatively recent update made it so you don't have to reload VS Code anymore when you install a new extension (most of the time, sometimes you do) and I really like that even if it's just a simple quality of life thing.

    As for performance, I don't think I care. It's got Electron's big RAM-filled butt that it sits on, but I have enough to spare. I have never really paid attention to the CPU usage, that might be something to look into.

    18 votes
    1. cfabbro
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Ditto, and for everything vscode struggles with (e.g. super large files, esp find/replace in them), I just switch to Notepad++, which handles that stuff like a dream. p.s. For anyone interested in...

      Ditto, and for everything vscode struggles with (e.g. super large files, esp find/replace in them), I just switch to Notepad++, which handles that stuff like a dream.

      p.s. For anyone interested in reading more responses, this same question was asked last year too:
      https://tildes.net/~comp/7i7/what_editor_do_you_use

      7 votes
    2. [4]
      reese
      Link Parent
      I use VS Code as well, but exclusively with the amVim extension. I've been evangelizing this extension since I joined Tildes. I haven't found anything worth replacing it. Works like a charm.

      I use VS Code as well, but exclusively with the amVim extension. I've been evangelizing this extension since I joined Tildes. I haven't found anything worth replacing it. Works like a charm.

      7 votes
      1. antiolrach
        Link Parent
        Wow, can you read my mind? I was just thinking today that I’d love to use vim bindings in VS Code

        Wow, can you read my mind? I was just thinking today that I’d love to use vim bindings in VS Code

        1 vote
      2. [2]
        ras
        Link Parent
        Is there any advantage to amVim over VSCodeVim?

        Is there any advantage to amVim over VSCodeVim?

        1 vote
        1. Adys
          Link Parent
          I think @reese was the one who told me about amVim. I have switched over from vscode-vim. It is a lot faster overall; vscode-vim is sluggy at best. But both of them lack a huge amount of features,...

          I think @reese was the one who told me about amVim. I have switched over from vscode-vim. It is a lot faster overall; vscode-vim is sluggy at best. But both of them lack a huge amount of features, and it doesn't feel like there's any real progress being made in either of them.

          I'm super happy with vscode but the vim bindings are lacking :(

          2 votes
    3. Seven
      Link Parent
      I use VSCode as well for literally everything, and I love it. As a Windows user, the remote development in WSL feature is super convenient for me. Not having to worry about all the quirks of...

      I use VSCode as well for literally everything, and I love it. As a Windows user, the remote development in WSL feature is super convenient for me. Not having to worry about all the quirks of Windows development is just so great.

      4 votes
  2. [2]
    Staross
    Link
    I use an editor I wrote for myself. I'm doing scientific computing and I'm a bit peculiar when it comes to having interactive figures, integrated REPL and ways of executing code (specially after...

    I use an editor I wrote for myself. I'm doing scientific computing and I'm a bit peculiar when it comes to having interactive figures, integrated REPL and ways of executing code (specially after years of using matlab). Even though it's limited in some ways and buggy I haven't yet found something that suits me better. I also use vs code when I need some features like multiple cursors.

    13 votes
    1. ThatFanficGuy
      Link Parent
      This reminds me of vid. The guy wrote his own programming language – and then wrote an editor in it.

      This reminds me of vid. The guy wrote his own programming language – and then wrote an editor in it.

      2 votes
  3. [3]
    cwagner
    Link
    The JetBrains suite of tools. I used to mainly use Visual Studio with ReSharper, and for the few times I did pure JS stuff: WebStorm and Java: IntelliJ. But recently, after yet another round of...

    The JetBrains suite of tools. I used to mainly use Visual Studio with ReSharper, and for the few times I did pure JS stuff: WebStorm and Java: IntelliJ.

    But recently, after yet another round of trying, and failing, to replace ReSharper, I had enough of it and simply fully switched to their IDEs (while I was at it, also to Datagrip instead of SQL Server Management Studio).

    While startup takes a moment, they are otherwise really fast and I get all the features I want.

    7 votes
    1. [2]
      Omnicrola
      Link Parent
      I also use JetBrains's full suite of stuff both at work and home. Love all of them, don't mind giving them money at all. ReSharper is great but sloooow. I've very much enjoyed using Rider when...

      I also use JetBrains's full suite of stuff both at work and home. Love all of them, don't mind giving them money at all. ReSharper is great but sloooow. I've very much enjoyed using Rider when messing around with Unity.

      2 votes
      1. cwagner
        Link Parent
        I only use them at home. But my workplace removed my workstation after I hadn’t been there for half a year, so it’s work as well ;) And yeah, the slowness was my problem. I’ll probably switch back...

        I only use them at home. But my workplace removed my workstation after I hadn’t been there for half a year, so it’s work as well ;)

        And yeah, the slowness was my problem. I’ll probably switch back to VS/R# when they manage the out-of-process change for it because a) I have the full suite anyway and b) I work on a bunch of legacy projects and publishing them works way better with VS (and I still use it for that).

        1 vote
  4. [4]
    vaddi
    Link
    Emacs, together with using Linux on my main machine both force me to learn/understand more about computers.

    Emacs, together with using Linux on my main machine both force me to learn/understand more about computers.

    6 votes
    1. [3]
      clone1
      Link Parent
      In what way does using a certain text editor force you to learn more about computers?

      In what way does using a certain text editor force you to learn more about computers?

      4 votes
      1. vaddi
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Emacs is not a very good editor out of the box so you need to configure it. But since it is a very old piece of software, personalizing it requires you to search stuff online, program, understand...

        Emacs is not a very good editor out of the box so you need to configure it. But since it is a very old piece of software, personalizing it requires you to search stuff online, program, understand its pitfalls, and knowing a little bit of every Linux tool/utility that communicates with it.

        For example, if you want to set up a dictionary, you'll soon discover what are aspell and/or hunspell. Additionally, if your native language is not english you will probably have a bunch different dictionaries, and will have to know how to pass different arguments to this utilities from inside Emacs. Stuff like this happens all the time and forces you to understand your tools.

        Another example is using Emacs to write LaTeX. For that I had to look up about different TeX engines (pdfTeX, XeTeX, etc.) and a bunch of other stuff, but in Overleaf I would simply press compile and not care about what was happening in the background.

        Yet another example: when setting up my Python editing environment I found out about jedi, flake8, pylint, black, rope etc. It is not like I 100% understand all of this tools, but I know which pieces make up my final tool, while if I was using VScode I would simple install the Python package and be done with it.

        It is also true that some times I don't have time to look into stuff and simply use VScode or Overleaf.

        9 votes
      2. rogue_cricket
        Link Parent
        Potentially they're writing ELisp to modify it? Not that other IDEs can't be modified similarly.

        Potentially they're writing ELisp to modify it? Not that other IDEs can't be modified similarly.

        2 votes
  5. [2]
    Diff
    Link
    Used to use VSCodium. Might go back to it, I have to say I do miss the intelligent autocompletion for Go code. It's weird, the only IDEs that have that are either big non-native Electron behemoths...

    Used to use VSCodium. Might go back to it, I have to say I do miss the intelligent autocompletion for Go code. It's weird, the only IDEs that have that are either big non-native Electron behemoths (Atom, VSCode) or just have a messy interface (LiteIDE) or one that doesn't integrate well at all with the desktop (Sublime).

    So for the moment I've given up all that convenience for Gedit and/or GNOME Builder which are nice, native, well-behaved applications.

    But if anyone knows how to get Golang autocomplete going on in either of these, please lemme know. GNOME Builder has "Ctags" support but I have no idea what that is and I have completely failed to find out how to make use of it despite much effort.

    6 votes
    1. reese
      Link Parent
      Back when I wrote Go for money, I just used VS Code, but I knew a guy who shelled out for GoLand and swore by it. Looks like JetBrains offers a 30-day trial for it if you're interested.

      Back when I wrote Go for money, I just used VS Code, but I knew a guy who shelled out for GoLand and swore by it. Looks like JetBrains offers a 30-day trial for it if you're interested.

      4 votes
  6. undu
    Link
    I use neovim with several plugins for searching, autocompletion and linting: https://gitlab.com/unduthegun/dotfiles/tree/master/nvim/.config/nvim I use it for editing OCaml, C and Python, as well...

    I use neovim with several plugins for searching, autocompletion and linting: https://gitlab.com/unduthegun/dotfiles/tree/master/nvim/.config/nvim

    I use it for editing OCaml, C and Python, as well as viewing logs and manpages.

    Right now I'm waiting on the tree-sitter integration which will hopefully make syntax highlighting better. But it's more than enough for editing projects with hundreds of thousands of lines and I'm happy with it.

    6 votes
  7. scissortail
    Link
    I'm pretty fond of nano--I'm no coding god, but its simplicity and ease of use suit me just fine.

    I'm pretty fond of nano--I'm no coding god, but its simplicity and ease of use suit me just fine.

    6 votes
  8. cmccabe
    Link
    Vim or nano, because I’m boring.

    Vim or nano, because I’m boring.

    5 votes
  9. alexandria
    Link
    I move between ed(1), ex-vi(1), and vim(1). In vim I have some convenience plugins for vim-orgmode, and some things like clearing search highlights and making searches case insensitive. That's...

    I move between ed(1), ex-vi(1), and vim(1).

    In vim I have some convenience plugins for vim-orgmode, and some things like clearing search highlights and making searches case insensitive. That's generally all I've ever needed tbh. I turn syntax highlighting off in vim (and the other two don't have it).

    4 votes
  10. [6]
    Grand0rbiter
    Link
    Kakoune.

    Kakoune.

    4 votes
    1. [5]
      giodamelio
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I'm curious what you think of Kakoune? I have been a vimmer for years but I am pretty interested in Kakoune. The few times I have tried it I have been turned away by the lack of plugins and the...

      I'm curious what you think of Kakoune? I have been a vimmer for years but I am pretty interested in Kakoune. The few times I have tried it I have been turned away by the lack of plugins and the sort of strange plugin architecture. I keep thinking about it though.

      3 votes
      1. [2]
        Grand0rbiter
        Link Parent
        I love it. The instant feedback is awesome, specially with multiple selections. The command syntax is intuitive for me and since i didn't use vim that much in the past, it was quick for me to pick...

        I love it. The instant feedback is awesome, specially with multiple selections. The command syntax is intuitive for me and since i didn't use vim that much in the past, it was quick for me to pick up.

        My needs are simple so i just use it vanilla with little configuration. Don't use any plugins for now, so i don't miss anything.

        Anyway, multiple selection is a delight to use. Specially when i use a bulkrename script i made (or the one within nnn) that puts all the filenames in a text file so i can rename using kakoune. Like when i need to rename a bunch of subtitle files (.srt) to match the names of the episodes of a season, it is so simple to select all the text until before the extension (.mp4), yank and just paste in the subtitles just before the .srt, hit :wq and done.

        3 votes
        1. giodamelio
          Link Parent
          The multi select is what has drawn me to trying a few times. It seems more intuitive. I will have to give it another look.

          The multi select is what has drawn me to trying a few times. It seems more intuitive. I will have to give it another look.

          3 votes
      2. [2]
        ntgg
        Link Parent
        I switched from vim to kakoune about a year ago, after like 4 years of using vim as my primary editor. I have found that there are plugins for everything I need, and to me the plug-in architecture...

        I switched from vim to kakoune about a year ago, after like 4 years of using vim as my primary editor. I have found that there are plugins for everything I need, and to me the plug-in architecture makes just as much sense as vim's, if not more. The best part is that writing a plugin for kakoune is super easy and extensible, so you can do essentially anything you want with it. I personally use the plugins plug.kak, kak-lsp, auto-pairs.kak, and a few more. You can see my config here. I also have a few scripts in my autoload directory, but I don't have those backed up apparently, so they are not there.

        The only big downside is that major breakig changes can still happen, and probably will happen, but that is usually a 5 minute fix, if it even effects you. The other downside that I can think of is the documentation for the more in-depth stuff is mostly found in an issue on GitHub, not in the readme or wiki.

        One cool thing, and the original reason I checked it out, is that the highlighters are region based, so when editing markdown or latex code blocks you can get syntax highlighting for the language you specify.

        I recommend reading the migrating from vim guide if you're coming from vim, and giving kakoune a try!

        3 votes
        1. giodamelio
          Link Parent
          Thanks for the links. I will have to give it a try again. Maybe I will take a swing at making a simple plugin.

          Thanks for the links. I will have to give it a try again. Maybe I will take a swing at making a simple plugin.

          2 votes
  11. null_radix
    Link
    emacs and neovim... i use emacs b/c i started programming in scheme and orgs-mode is nice, but for most other things i use neovim

    emacs and neovim... i use emacs b/c i started programming in scheme and orgs-mode is nice, but for most other things i use neovim

    4 votes
  12. [3]
    Apos
    Link
    Right now I mostly use vscode, but I plan on using Oni2 as soon as it's ready. I made my own theme for vscode: https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=vyne.apostheme

    Right now I mostly use vscode, but I plan on using Oni2 as soon as it's ready.

    I made my own theme for vscode: https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=vyne.apostheme

    4 votes
  13. vegai
    Link
    (Doom) Emacs or Visual Code Studio depending on how much pain I'm prepared to stand :) Emacs is <3 but love hurts sometimes.

    (Doom) Emacs or Visual Code Studio depending on how much pain I'm prepared to stand :) Emacs is <3 but love hurts sometimes.

    4 votes
  14. shiruken
    Link
    Visual Studio Code! Swapped from Atom last year.

    Visual Studio Code! Swapped from Atom last year.

    3 votes
  15. Flashynuff
    Link
    I swear by IntelliJ, or VS Code for smaller projects. I'm continually amazed by the things that the VS Code team has figured out how to do with Electron.

    I swear by IntelliJ, or VS Code for smaller projects. I'm continually amazed by the things that the VS Code team has figured out how to do with Electron.

    3 votes
  16. evrim
    Link
    I’ve been using RubyMine for the last few years, both for Ruby on Rails projects and React Native projects. It has been working great for me.

    I’ve been using RubyMine for the last few years, both for Ruby on Rails projects and React Native projects. It has been working great for me.

    3 votes
  17. Kremor
    Link
    I use emacs with evil mode, I love how hackable it is but I wish the extensions were as hassle free as the ones in VSCode.

    I use emacs with evil mode, I love how hackable it is but I wish the extensions were as hassle free as the ones in VSCode.

    3 votes
  18. Wulfsta
    Link
    Neovim has been my editor of choice for quite a while now.

    Neovim has been my editor of choice for quite a while now.

    3 votes
  19. cardigan
    Link
    Most of the time I spend on a computer is spent inside of GNU Emacs. Through it I send a lot of email, manage and play my music and movie libraries, do basic web browsing, use all of the chat...

    Most of the time I spend on a computer is spent inside of GNU Emacs. Through it I send a lot of email, manage and play my music and movie libraries, do basic web browsing, use all of the chat services that I use, and maintain my weblog and personal writings. Typically, the only other programs I'll open on my computer are Firefox and the occasional terminal emulator for utilities that don't degrade gracefully to ansi-term.

    I don't often think about how fast it is except when my (very slow) network connection causes it to hang when it's trying to fetch some email.

    There are many reasons why I use it. One crucial one is a preference to lead my digital life through one consistent and extensible interface. Another is that I very much support the social and technical ethos of Emacs, which is described in this essay that comes with every copy of the program.

    3 votes
  20. fifthecho
    Link
    I bounce between VS Code and Sublime. I want to become more of a full-time Sublime user, but the Extensions for VS Code are more discoverable and often times more mature.

    I bounce between VS Code and Sublime.

    I want to become more of a full-time Sublime user, but the Extensions for VS Code are more discoverable and often times more mature.

    2 votes
  21. [2]
    markh
    Link
    Is there anything for Sublime similar to VSCode’s default git diff viewer? That thing is super valuable.

    Is there anything for Sublime similar to VSCode’s default git diff viewer? That thing is super valuable.

    2 votes
    1. StellarTabi
      Link Parent
      Is this for diffs or for merge conflicts? Meld is much better than VSCode for merge conflicts.

      Is this for diffs or for merge conflicts? Meld is much better than VSCode for merge conflicts.

      2 votes
  22. Micycle_the_Bichael
    Link
    Vs Code => VS Codium => Atom. I started in VS Code. It was fine. I had problems with plugins and getting things to work right but honestly my use cases are so minimal it was mostly from a lack of...

    Vs Code => VS Codium => Atom.

    I started in VS Code. It was fine. I had problems with plugins and getting things to work right but honestly my use cases are so minimal it was mostly from a lack of caring enough to fix it. Moved to codium. Had the same experience. Eventually switched to atom bc I have a coworker who cares a lot about his IDE and had a nice setup and did most the legwork for me so now I have a nice IDE and didn’t have to go through the headaches of setting it up and tweaking it. Both VS’s work really well I have nothing against them I’m just lazy

    2 votes
  23. krg
    Link
    I mostly code lil toy projects and micro has been serving me well for that.

    I mostly code lil toy projects and micro has been serving me well for that.

    2 votes
  24. stu2b50
    Link
    Visual Studio Code w/ Vim Keybindings + Vim VSCode for when I'm working on a single project for a while. The SSH plugin is really nice. Vim for logs and quicker edits. In the end, Vim is fast and...

    Visual Studio Code w/ Vim Keybindings + Vim

    VSCode for when I'm working on a single project for a while. The SSH plugin is really nice.

    Vim for logs and quicker edits. In the end, Vim is fast and vim is available, and for some things a text editor like VSCode is just not the right tool.

    2 votes
  25. synergy
    Link
    either IntelliJ or Sublime when I'm working on Mac and notepad++ on windows. Tried VS Code couple times, just couldn't get into it. It's too bloated and slow. I could see myself taking the time to...

    either IntelliJ or Sublime when I'm working on Mac and notepad++ on windows.
    Tried VS Code couple times, just couldn't get into it. It's too bloated and slow. I could see myself taking the time to get used to it if I did more front end work.

    2 votes
  26. aymm
    Link
    On my Windows desktop I use VSCode. It's a good IDE, but I do notice some speed issues. Especially with PlatformIO it tends to hang sometimes for a couple seconds, sometimes it even needs to...

    On my Windows desktop I use VSCode. It's a good IDE, but I do notice some speed issues. Especially with PlatformIO it tends to hang sometimes for a couple seconds, sometimes it even needs to reload the window.

    On my Macbook I currently use TextMate, and have used Sublime Text in the past. Both are pretty fast and I like the overall feel of TexteMate better, but Sublime has better plugins

    2 votes
  27. cadentius_aurelius
    Link
    For just hammering out a Shell script, or editing a few lines of a single module or config, Kate. Its in the KDE ecosystem, so it has some integrations with stuff like Dolphin, and it can be used...

    For just hammering out a Shell script, or editing a few lines of a single module or config, Kate. Its in the KDE ecosystem, so it has some integrations with stuff like Dolphin, and it can be used as a backend in other KDE programs (none come to mind, but there was at least one specialized editor that I realized was using all my Kate settings). Frankly not much more advanced than NP++, but it is fast and it has an absurdly wide array of highlighting syntaxes (and 99% of the time it guesses correctly which to use).

    For any project with more than a file or two, PyCharm. Even non-Python things. Relative to Kate, it is fat and it is slow, taking up a gigabyte of RAM on average, but wow...the power. Ctrl-click to jump to declaration of any name, double-ctrl+up/down or alt-click to add more cursors, configurable inspections for everything, a keybind to instantly run Black, and even VCS integrations that correctly call to my YubiKey to sign/push commits.

    It could be that I am just used to doing refactors the hard way, but JB really locked me in with this one.

    2 votes
  28. mrbig
    Link
    Emacs.

    Emacs.

    2 votes
  29. HanakoIsBestGirl
    Link
    Idle for python and otherwise nano because im a noob

    Idle for python and otherwise nano because im a noob

    2 votes
  30. top
    Link
    I use ne, the nice editor. It's like nano in its "just type and it works" but like a GUI with visual menus at the top (when you press F1). Nice and fast, works well through ssh, configurable...

    I use ne, the nice editor. It's like nano in its "just type and it works" but like a GUI with visual menus at the top (when you press F1). Nice and fast, works well through ssh, configurable keybinding, easy macros, fairly standard keyboard shortcuts, the list goes on.

    2 votes
  31. onyxleopard
    Link
    I use TextMate 2.0. It’s the best native macOS text editor I’ve ever used. I don’t use IDEs as I don’t like being separated from my code. I think there’s such a thing as too much tooling.

    I use TextMate 2.0. It’s the best native macOS text editor I’ve ever used. I don’t use IDEs as I don’t like being separated from my code. I think there’s such a thing as too much tooling.

    2 votes
  32. Wren
    Link
    For stuff like editing config files and writing a few lines of bash I use nano simply because I'm usually already in the terminal and why not. For actual programming I use Sublime. It's a good...

    For stuff like editing config files and writing a few lines of bash I use nano simply because I'm usually already in the terminal and why not.

    For actual programming I use Sublime. It's a good combination of simplicity and functionality, and it's not overly focused towards any individual language.

    2 votes
  33. [2]
    starchturrets
    Link
    VScode, then VScodium. I’ve tried to setup vim/neovim for web dev, but I couldn’t even install plugins without running into weird errors, so I gave up.

    VScode, then VScodium. I’ve tried to setup vim/neovim for web dev, but I couldn’t even install plugins without running into weird errors, so I gave up.

    2 votes
    1. LukasDrsman
      Link Parent
      I gave up on plugin managers with vim. I just install them manually.

      I gave up on plugin managers with vim. I just install them manually.

      2 votes