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    1. RoguelikeDev Does The Complete Roguelike Tutorial Starting June 16th 2020

      Link to the post: https://www.reddit.com/r/roguelikedev/comments/grccvt/roguelikedev_does_the_complete_roguelike_tutorial/ Text of the post copied below, to save you from having to wait for Reddit...

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      Roguelikedev Does The Complete Roguelike Tutorial is back again this year. It will start in three weeks on Tuesday June 16th. The goal is the same this year - to give roguelike devs the encouragement to start creating a roguelike and to carry through to the end.

      Like last year, we'll be following http://rogueliketutorials.com/tutorials/tcod/. The tutorial is written for Python+libtcod but, If you want to tag along using a different language or library you are encouraged to join as well with the expectation that you'll be blazing your own trail.

      The series will follow a once-a-week cadence. Each week a discussion post will link to that week's Complete Roguelike Tutorial sections as well as relevant FAQ Fridays posts. The discussion will be a way to work out any problems, brainstorm ideas, share progress and any tangential chatting.

      If you like, the Roguelike(dev) discord's #roguelikedev-help channel is a great place to hangout and get tutorial help in a more interactive setting.

      Schedule Summary

      Week 1- Tues June 16th

      Parts 0 & 1

      Week 2- Tues June 23th

      Parts 2 & 3

      Week 3 - Tues June 30th

      Parts 4 & 5

      Week 4 - Tues July 7th

      Parts 6 & 7

      Week 5 - Tues July 14th

      Parts 8 & 9

      Week 6 - Tues July 21th

      Parts 10 & 11

      Week 8 - Tues July 28th

      Share you game / Conclusion

      I've followed along with these before and it's a pretty fun experience. Even if you have made a roguelike before, you will still learn a lot of new things by keeping up with and reading the comments and code posted by others as the event goes on.

      For anyone wanting to dip their toes into basic game development, this a great, hand-holding way to do that.

      5 votes
    2. Learning resources for my soon to be twelve year old son?

      My son's elementary school teachers are phenomenal. He's, also, had a gifted and talented instructor since he was four years old. He's, approximately, four to five years ahead of his peers in...

      My son's elementary school teachers are phenomenal. He's, also, had a gifted and talented instructor since he was four years old. He's, approximately, four to five years ahead of his peers in reading comprehension and mathematics.

      Our schools have been closed now for three weeks and both our sons have been using an iPad and a Macbook to do classwork.

      Today my twelve year old's teacher gave him free reign to learn whatever that interests him. He wants to learn how to make video games. In his own words: "I don't want to make a million dollar game. I just want to make something simple."

      He's been learning BASIC but he fails to see any real world application right now.

      Would you happen to know any free and paid resources that I could provide him in his endeavor?

      12 votes
    3. Game Frameworks: What are people using for game jams nowadays?

      Hi, I've been mulling ideas about a game for a while now, I'd like to hack out a prototype, and my default would be Love2D. (As an aside: one of the things I like about Love2D was that you could...

      Hi,

      I've been mulling ideas about a game for a while now, I'd like to hack out a prototype, and my default would be Love2D. (As an aside: one of the things I like about Love2D was that you could make a basic 'game' in a couple of LoC, and it was 'efficient enough' for what you got. Perhaps the only gripe I had with it was that it didn't output compiled binaries (I mean, you could make it do that, but it seemed like a hack). I think Polycode seemed to be a semi-serious contender, but last I checked (a year or two ago) it's pretty much as dead as a doornail. Some of the other alternatives I remember seeing (Godot? Unity?) felt too much like Blender.

      So I've been wondering, it's been a while since I've been keeping tabs on the 'gamedev community', so I don't know if there have been any more recent development in that space.

      So I guess my question is: What are people using for game jams nowadays? Preach to me (and everyone else) about your favorite framework and language :)

      15 votes
    4. Programming Challenge: Make a game in 1 hour!

      Background There's been some talk on ~ before, and it seems like there are quite a few people who are either interested in, learning, or working in game development, so I thought this could be a...

      Background

      There's been some talk on ~ before, and it seems like there are quite a few people who are either interested in, learning, or working in game development, so I thought this could be a fun programming challenge.

      This one is fairly open-ended: make a game in 1 hour. Any game, any engine, don't worry about art or sound or anything.

      Doing is the best way to learn. Most people's first project is something overly ambitious, and when they find that it's more difficult than they thought, they can get discouraged, or even give up entirely. This is why the 1 hour limit is important: it forces you to finish something, even if it's small. When you're done, you can come out of it saying you made a game, and you learned from it.

      Chances are the game might not be fun, look bad, be buggy, etc. But don't worry about that, everyone's game will have problems, and if you do create something really fun or innovative, congratulations, you have a prototype that you can expand on later!

      "Rules"

      Like I said before, these "rules" are pretty simple: make a game in (approximately) 1 hour. You can use any tools you want. If you use external assets (art, sound), it's probably best you use something you have the rights to (see resources). If you're completely new to game development/programming, your goal could even be to finish a tutorial.

      If you're the kind of person who tends to get carried away with these things, you might want to post a comment saying you're starting, then another one once you've finished your game.

      Please share your finished game, I'm sure everyone would love to try them! If your game is web-based, it can be hosted for free on Github Pages or Itch.io. If downloadable, it can be hosted for free on Google Drive, Mega, Dropbox, Itch.io, etc.

      Resources

      Engines

      If you're a beginner, a good engine to start with is LÖVE. It's very simple, and uses Lua, which is very easy to learn.

      If you're familiar with another language, you could use a library to make it in that language. Some examples:

      C++: SFML, SDL, Allegro

      Javascript: kontra, Phaser, pixi.js

      Python: pygame

      Rust: Piston, ggez, Amethyst

      If you want something more complex, consider Godot, Unity, or Unreal.

      You can also try something visual like Construct, Clickteam Fusion, or GDevelop

      Art

      For such a short time constraint, I'd suggest you use your own "programmer art": just use some basic shapes. Your primary focus should be gameplay.

      If you think you have time to find something, try looking on OpenGameArt.

      Sound

      You can make simple sound effects very quickly with sfxr (or in this case, a web port of sfxr called jsfxr).

      27 votes