49 votes

Open-Source, Free Games

For those of you who may be too poor to afford the latest AAA titles, or just don't want to support policies like micro-transactions and "If you're offended, just don't buy it", there are many open-source and/or free games that can tide you over. Some of my favorites are:

  • FreeCiv: A civilization building game based on Sid Meier's Civilization 1 and 2
  • OpenTTD: A transport network building game based off of Chris Sawyer's Transport Tycoon Deluxe
  • Dwarf Fortress: Not Open-Source - fortress colony management simulator with an additional RPG gamemode

Do you guys have any other free, possibly open-source games that you would recommend?

51 comments

  1. [13]
    vili (edited ) Link
    Nethack is an open source dungeon adventure that's been around for over 30 years now and was one of the first games to be called "roguelike", long before the word acquired a slightly new meaning...

    Nethack is an open source dungeon adventure that's been around for over 30 years now and was one of the first games to be called "roguelike", long before the word acquired a slightly new meaning in the late 2000s. Despite playing it for almost three decades, I've never been able to complete it (I've been close twice!) and I still discover new secrets when I play.

    The Ur-Quan Masters is an open source port and update of the classic Star Control II, a game that among other things inspired the Mass Effect series. Absolutely brilliant and quite funny!

    The Battle for Wesnoth is a lovely fantasy strategy game somewhat reminiscent of the Warlords series from the 90s.

    18 votes
    1. [11]
      masochist Link Parent
      Nethack is also actively antagonistic toward player success, gleefully ignoring so many lessons of good game design and letting the player actively put themselves into a situation where they...

      Nethack is also actively antagonistic toward player success, gleefully ignoring so many lessons of good game design and letting the player actively put themselves into a situation where they either cannot win or will die. I would absolutely not recommend it as someone's first roguelike because of how much it actively wants the player to suffer. Nethack was my first roguelike and it was so unkind that it convinced me I hated roguelikes. Then I tried some others and learned that, no, it's just Nethack.

      8 votes
      1. vili Link Parent
        You are absolutely correct that Nethack is not everyone's cup of tea and I'm certainly aware that this topic really divides players, like Coke and Pepsi or something. Sorry, I'm getting my liquid...

        You are absolutely correct that Nethack is not everyone's cup of tea and I'm certainly aware that this topic really divides players, like Coke and Pepsi or something. Sorry, I'm getting my liquid metaphors all mixed up here.

        Anyway, my experience has been pretty much the opposite from yours. The Moria-based roguelikes like Angband just never really clicked with me at all. I'm not exactly sure why, but I suppose it's probably because I feel Nethack is more of a randomly generated puzzle game than a real RPG, because of Nethack's humour, because of Nethack feeling less grindy than for instance Angband, because I'm a bit allergic to Tolkien, and because for these reasons I simply played it more early on and therefore feel more at home in that world now.

        Similarly, while I have checked newer iterations in the genre and can recognise the qualities of games like Linley's Dungeon Crawl and Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, they just always make me return to Nethack in the end. I guess partly out of habit by now.

        There was one exception, though. In fact, I may actually have spent more combined time in my life playing ADOM than Nethack. There was a period when I got really, really sucked into it, but for some reason I haven't touched it for close to twenty years now, whereas I still dip into Nethack at least once a year. Nethack's Android port is actually one of the first apps that I install on a new phone, even if I rarely play it there (the controls are quite horrible on a touch screen) other than when bored on an airplane or something. It just feels good to know that it's there.

        I have occasionally looked at the Steam page for the new ADOM, but haven't taken a bite yet. I probably should, if only to pay the creator for the countless hours that I spent with his game back in the day. I did send him a postcard in 1996 though, so I feel I have done my part in supporting the development (or maybe not).

        As for Nethack's alleged antagonism towards the player, it doesn't bother me. I suppose it's because of the way I see it as a sandbox puzzle game, and not as something to be completed. I just like to jump in, make a run and enjoy what happens, while making note of how far I managed to get this time.

        Because of this, the game's later levels are also quite beyond me. In order to really git gud, I should probably read spoilers and guides, but that's not why I enter the dungeon. For me, Nethack is like Pacman, I turn it on and play, and no matter how well I do, ultimately I die. And I really like that game loop.

        7 votes
      2. [9]
        xstresedg Link Parent
        Any recommendations of good rougelikes? Nethack was also my first and since then, I don't enjoy them. Roguelites are fun though.

        Any recommendations of good rougelikes? Nethack was also my first and since then, I don't enjoy them. Roguelites are fun though.

        4 votes
        1. [6]
          masochist (edited ) Link Parent
          First, thank you for differentiating between roguelike and roguelite, especially in this discussion. To answer your question, it depends upon what you like! Probably the biggest question is: how...

          First, thank you for differentiating between roguelike and roguelite, especially in this discussion.

          To answer your question, it depends upon what you like! Probably the biggest question is: how do you feel about fantasy settings? Lots of roguelikes have a fantasy setting, but a few don't. What are you looking for in a roguelike? That's another important question. Does the game need to be in active development or are you okay playing something frozen in time?

          edit: tyop

          3 votes
          1. [2]
            xstresedg Link Parent
            I'm a fantasy guy primarily, as well preferring graphical as opposed to ASCII style games. I didn't actually know that roguelite was a thing, constantly thinking it was a typo. Just learned what...

            I'm a fantasy guy primarily, as well preferring graphical as opposed to ASCII style games.

            I didn't actually know that roguelite was a thing, constantly thinking it was a typo. Just learned what it meant a few months ago, despite having played roguelites.

            2 votes
            1. masochist Link Parent
              I should point out that I prefer ASCII graphics, so while I'm going to make suggestions that have graphical options, I haven't tested them extensively so can't comment on them. First, there are...

              I should point out that I prefer ASCII graphics, so while I'm going to make suggestions that have graphical options, I haven't tested them extensively so can't comment on them.

              First, there are the suggestions in this post. I really like Angband, but Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup has a lot of good ideas as well. Angband has a lot of Tolkien inspiration, whereas DCSS has its own original world. TOME used to be called Tales of Middle Earth (as a derivative of Angband), but moved to its own world. If you want something with more of a sense of humor and you're fine paying a few dollars, Dungeons of Dredmor offers more complexity than just about anything I've mentioned already. It's a truly graphical roguelike in that it's not just randomly-generated with permadeath like the roguelites but it's also turn- and grid-based with a focus on tactical combat, etc., all the stuff you'd expect from the Berlin interpretation.

              2 votes
          2. [3]
            vili Link Parent
            Is there a non-fantasy roguelike that you would particularly recommend? I've never found a good one but would love to try one again!

            Is there a non-fantasy roguelike that you would particularly recommend? I've never found a good one but would love to try one again!

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              masochist Link Parent
              Sadly there aren't many. :( Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead (also mentioned in this thread) is probably the only one that meets the open source and free criteria. It's survival horror-themed, with...

              Sadly there aren't many. :( Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead (also mentioned in this thread) is probably the only one that meets the open source and free criteria. It's survival horror-themed, with Lovecraftian elements (which you might consider fantastical). Cogmind definitely meets the non-fantasy criterion, but it's neither free nor open source. The Wikipedia list of roguelikes doesn't even have much outside of that. If you sort by the setting column (click / tap it), you'll see that almost everything on the list has fantasy elements.

              This is definitely an untapped combination of setting and mechanics if any prospective game developers are reading!

              edit: If you're interested in roguelites, I can give you a number of good suggestions, but non-fantasy roguelikes are very rare.

              3 votes
              1. vili Link Parent
                Thanks! I think I'll give Cogmind a try. I have this very vague memory of playing a sci-fi roguelike in the early 90s, but can't for the life of me remember what it was called or whether it really...

                Thanks! I think I'll give Cogmind a try.

                I have this very vague memory of playing a sci-fi roguelike in the early 90s, but can't for the life of me remember what it was called or whether it really existed. I did a bit of googling and it could in theory be JauntTrooper, although in my head it had ascii graphics. Or I could be getting my decades mixed up and it was actually ZAPM, which I definitely have played at some point.

                Anyway, here are a couple of other sci-fi roguelikes that I encountered while doing research: Ascii Sector, Prospector, Eversector, AliensRL, and Xenomarine. I haven't played any of these.

                1 vote
        2. [2]
          AlastrionaCatskill Link Parent
          I've seen ToME, Angband, Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, and several others mentioned - all free and worth a spin.

          I've seen ToME, Angband, Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, and several others mentioned - all free and worth a spin.

          1 vote
    2. balooga Link Parent
      The Ur-Quan Masters is fantastic! We should mention Ur-Quan Masters HD, which is the more or less a modernized version of the same game.

      The Ur-Quan Masters is fantastic! We should mention Ur-Quan Masters HD, which is the more or less a modernized version of the same game.

      3 votes
  2. [5]
    mftrhu (edited ) Link
    Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead, a roguelike set in a modern, post-apocalyptic world plagued by zombies. It has a huge amount of depth, despite the fact that Z-levels have yet to land in the latest...

    Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead, a roguelike set in a modern, post-apocalyptic world plagued by zombies. It has a huge amount of depth, despite the fact that Z-levels have yet to land in the latest stable release (ignore it, 0.C is from 2015, just use experimental).

    Edit: also, The Powder Toy. It's a falling sand game/physics sandbox game with heat, electricity and pressure - you can literally draw a nuke, or a nuclear reactor, or even a CPU. I wasted a lot of time in my second year of uni with this, had a lot of fun, and I was working on my own calculator (I had gotten an adder done).

    Edit II, the return: oh! I'm not sure if OpenMW really counts as FOSS (you still need the assets from the original game IIRC), but the engine itself definitely is - and probably a better way to play Morrowind under Linux than going through Wine.

    Edit III, revenge of the edit: as of 2019-03-27, Cataclysm: DDA apparently moved from the en.cataclysmdda.org subdomain to a bare cataclysmdda.org and added HTTPS. They also released a new stable version on 2019-03-08, 0.D (Danny), consisting of the 37k+ commits made in the last three-four years.

    12 votes
    1. [2]
      rogue_cricket Link Parent
      I came here to suggest Cataclysm. It is an absolute blast, and the stories that come out of it are fantastic. One of my favourite moments was when my character was drinking a smoothie made out of...

      I came here to suggest Cataclysm. It is an absolute blast, and the stories that come out of it are fantastic. One of my favourite moments was when my character was drinking a smoothie made out of his former friend, reading a book by the light of a fire fuelled by the rest of that same guy.

      5 votes
      1. mftrhu Link Parent
        I fell in love with it when I accidentally set the tutorial on fire - the walls came down and I escaped, singed, into the game world. It was magnificent.

        I fell in love with it when I accidentally set the tutorial on fire - the walls came down and I escaped, singed, into the game world. It was magnificent.

        3 votes
    2. AlastrionaCatskill Link Parent
      Those are pretty cool games! Never could work around buiding neat Powder Toy stuff so i'd just make a pressurized volcano. I suppose if we're going to count OpenMW, I like OpenRCT2 as well.

      Those are pretty cool games! Never could work around buiding neat Powder Toy stuff so i'd just make a pressurized volcano.

      I suppose if we're going to count OpenMW, I like OpenRCT2 as well.

      3 votes
    3. masochist Link Parent
      If we're going to count OpenMW, then we should absolutely count all of the Doom, Hexen, Heretic, Quake, Quake 2, Quake 3, and similar source ports.

      If we're going to count OpenMW, then we should absolutely count all of the Doom, Hexen, Heretic, Quake, Quake 2, Quake 3, and similar source ports.

      3 votes
  3. [3]
    hungariantoast (edited ) Link
    Aurora 4X is another free, not open source, programmed as a hobby, in Visual Basic 6, (C# rewrite currently in alpha though) video game. (I'd link you to the Wikipedia article, but some asshat...

    Aurora 4X is another free, not open source, programmed as a hobby, in Visual Basic 6, (C# rewrite currently in alpha though) video game. (I'd link you to the Wikipedia article, but some asshat deleted it because Rock, Paper, Shotgun was the only media company brave enough to write about it.) It's an incredibly detailed, as in be sure to bring the correct amount of oxygen for your colonists to survive their trip to Mars detailed, 4X game set in space.

    There's a lot you can do in Aurora. You can start the game with a divided Earth, similar to what we have now, and compete with the various nations for control over the Sol system, or you could make things easier and just have a nice, cute, united Earth to start your game from. From there, you get to mine asteroids, build various ships, help the private industries build your economy, and get invaded by aliens and realize you forgot to design and research the thirty-six individual components necessary to build missile cruisers.

    Fun game.

    It is often times called "the Dwarf Fortress of space."

    Because it looks like this

    And this

    Let me just say that, I love complicated games. Hearts of Iron 3 is my most played game on Steam, Dwarf Fortress and Cataclysm: DDA are probably my most popular choices off of Steam, and I still have at least a hundred hours dumped in to Victoria II, Europa Universalis IV, Total War: Rome II & Attila, Star Ruler, anything Fallout or Elder Scrolls since Oblivion, AI War, Divinity: Original Sin, Pillars of Eternity, and I've got close to a hundred hours in Endless Legends and Endless Space 1 & 2, Supreme Ruler Ultimate, Distant Worlds, and more, but I think you get the point.

    I love complicated games. I've mastered Paradox Interactive's most unapproachable game. I know quite a bit about Dwarf Fortress and how the game actually works, how a lot of the mysterious gameplay emerges. I've mastered a majority of its mechanics and have dabbled in pretty much all the rest by now. I actually don't have to reference its wiki just to keep a minimal fort alive.

    I won't fucking touch this game.

    It's such a beautiful concept and idea. It offers so many options and paths to a player and honestly, understanding the mechanics isn't the hardest part of the game.

    No, not getting bored is the hardest part of the game.

    You see, Aurora 4X, being designed the way it is in Visual Basic 6, actually reads and writes all the relevant data for each turn (which can be from five seconds of in-game time, to thirty days, if I remember correctly), to a database file on your file system, making a SSD an absolute requirement to get some semblance of playability out of the game's performance.

    There's just one problem.

    Now, bear with me, I don't understand the intricacies of this system as this is technology that is quite before my time, I am just repeating what I have read.

    The read/write limit for the database file that Aurora uses to process everything in the game for each new turn? That limit is hard set by whatever API the game uses to interact with the database.

    So, your fancy SSD may be able to write hundreds of megabytes of data at any given second, and perhaps read even more, but Aurora doesn't care, because it's design has capped it at a certain, currently unknown read and write rate.

    Essentially, once the game really picks up, and you've got thousands of ships, asteroids, planets, and other objects in space, in the various star systems and alien races, the game has to read and write data for every single object to the disk, and it's programmatically capped at a hard limit for how fast it can do that, regardless of hardware capabilities.

    This means that eventually, regardless of hardware, every single computer capable of doing better than the capped limit still gets drug through the maelstrom of FPS death as games continue on, with turns of multiple, in-game days, eventually taking hours in real life to complete.

    This is also why there is going to be a C# rewrite of the game released sometime this year, which I have to hand it to Steve (the developer, once professional online Poker player), rewriting the game you've been making for over a decade, into an entirely different language, and releasing an alpha of that rewrite with all the current features of the normal build, in under three years, is quite impressive.

    But I won't touch Aurora until the C# alpha is out, because I have no interest in struggling to learn a game where FPS death is a programmed inevitability. At least with Dwarf Fortress I can drown some fucking kids.

    7 votes
    1. [2]
      masochist Link Parent
      Given how much you like complexity, have you tried AI War? It's neither free nor open source, but it definitely has the complexity that you're talking about. Additionally, I wonder if something...

      Given how much you like complexity, have you tried AI War? It's neither free nor open source, but it definitely has the complexity that you're talking about.

      Additionally, I wonder if something like Wine or ReactOS could be tweaked to remove those API limitations to get a lot more performance out of the game--if they even exist in those implementations.

      1 vote
      1. hungariantoast Link Parent
        Yeah, I love most of Arcen's games and AI War II is shaping up quite nicely, it's a shame that Stars Beyond Reach never made it out of their office though. The Last Federation and Skyward Collapse...

        Yeah, I love most of Arcen's games and AI War II is shaping up quite nicely, it's a shame that Stars Beyond Reach never made it out of their office though.

        The Last Federation and Skyward Collapse are probably my next favorite games by Arcen, after AI War, but Starward Rogue is also really fun.

        1 vote
  4. [2]
    Tygrak Link
    Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup: A pretty easy to learn rogue-like, can be played in the browser

    Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup: A pretty easy to learn rogue-like, can be played in the browser

    10 votes
    1. masochist Link Parent
      Note that, as is usual of a proper roguelike, there's still a lot of complexity in DCSS. Further, as the game is under active development (0.23 was just released two weeks ago), that complexity is...

      Note that, as is usual of a proper roguelike, there's still a lot of complexity in DCSS. Further, as the game is under active development (0.23 was just released two weeks ago), that complexity is changing. There's a lot of depth if you want to dig into it. A benefit of playing online is that it's easy to play an older version if that's what you're into. Again, I find myself liking older versions, so that's convenient. If you're so inclined, you can also build an older version from source, which is what I do.

      5 votes
  5. [2]
    nsz Link
    0 AD it's an age of empires style rts that seems like it has some promise. Still early in the development though.

    0 AD it's an age of empires style rts that seems like it has some promise. Still early in the development though.

    10 votes
    1. bilbodwyer Link Parent
      Ahhh 0AD. It's been early development for as long as I've been using Linux!

      Ahhh 0AD. It's been early development for as long as I've been using Linux!

      2 votes
  6. mat Link
    FreeOrion a 4X game in the style of Master of Orion. I'm not allowed to install it because otherwise I lose all my time to it.

    FreeOrion a 4X game in the style of Master of Orion.

    I'm not allowed to install it because otherwise I lose all my time to it.

    8 votes
  7. [2]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. Grendel Link Parent
      I just recently started playing Xonotic and the community really is friendly. Everyone is just there to play and have fun, and no one really stresses about winning or rankings or anything. You...

      I just recently started playing Xonotic and the community really is friendly. Everyone is just there to play and have fun, and no one really stresses about winning or rankings or anything. You have to catch it at the right time though, as the servers can be pretty dead during the day.

      2 votes
  8. Pannuba Link
    StepMania is an open-source clone of Dance Dance Revolution with many added features such as the ability to download and play custom songs (from here and here, mainly), themes, keyboard and USB...

    StepMania is an open-source clone of Dance Dance Revolution with many added features such as the ability to download and play custom songs (from here and here, mainly), themes, keyboard and USB pad support, speed mods and more.

    8 votes
  9. moocow1452 Link
    Pixel Dungeon and all of the various rebuilds are pretty nice as far as phone roguelikes go.

    Pixel Dungeon and all of the various rebuilds are pretty nice as far as phone roguelikes go.

    7 votes
  10. Netzakh Link
    Tales of Maj’Eyal (ToME) is a free, open source roguelike RPG. ToME on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_of_Maj%27Eyal And there are many Angband variants which are both free and...

    Tales of Maj’Eyal (ToME) is a free, open source roguelike RPG.

    ToME on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_of_Maj%27Eyal

    And there are many Angband variants which are both free and open-source. More: http://www.roguebasin.com/index.php?title=List_of_Angband_variants

    5 votes
  11. masochist Link
    Just to clarify the comment here, Angband is itself another roguelike (one of the oldest, around the same vintage as Nethack). It derived from Moria (so old it doesn't have an official website,...

    Just to clarify the comment here, Angband is itself another roguelike (one of the oldest, around the same vintage as Nethack). It derived from Moria (so old it doesn't have an official website, unless you count a rewrite (I don't)), and as you may guess from the names, they're both largely Tolkien-inspired (though the devs take some liberties). If you find Nethack excessively cruel (it is entirely possible to die on the first turn of the game through no fault of your own) and Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup (otherwise known as DCSS) excessively complex, Angband might be just what you want. The game's changed maintainers a few times in recent years, and as such has taken a different direction. I am personally very much not a fan of this new direction, and I stick with version 3.5.1 (I like to say that Angband is like D&D and that 3.5 was the last good version), but the game is still actively developed if you want to try the new versions.

    And if you happen to be on a Unix system, browsing the games ported to your platform can be pretty educational and informative (e.g. through the ports or packages directory). I've played or at least heard of everything in this thread already, largely through exploring the FreeBSD ports tree.

    5 votes
  12. [3]
    Keegan (edited ) Link
    Openarena is essentially a quake remake with a server browser and tons of game modes. There is a semiactive community in the game, but there's always at least one server of each gamemode with...

    Openarena is essentially a quake remake with a server browser and tons of game modes. There is a semiactive community in the game, but there's always at least one server of each gamemode with actual people in it. There hasn't been an update in a while though (but I haven't seen any bugs at all, so it really isn't that essential for any updates).

    http://www.openarena.ws/
    https://github.com/OpenArena/

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      Macil Link Parent
      I think it's worth emphasizing that the game is exactly Quake 3's engine and gameplay with improved netcode added in. I love jumping into a free-for-all match in OpenArena. It's a very fast...

      I think it's worth emphasizing that the game is exactly Quake 3's engine and gameplay with improved netcode added in.
      I love jumping into a free-for-all match in OpenArena. It's a very fast gameplay loop, and the game is quick to load and connect, so I can even easily drop in for as little as a few minutes and have some fun.

      3 votes
      1. Keegan Link Parent
        Oh wow, I did not even realize it was the same engine. Very interesting. One of the cool things is how it requires almost nothing to run. It even runs on a Raspberry Pi pretty well, hitting 50+...

        Oh wow, I did not even realize it was the same engine. Very interesting.

        One of the cool things is how it requires almost nothing to run. It even runs on a Raspberry Pi pretty well, hitting 50+ frames per second (I'm not sure what settings it was on).

        1 vote
  13. [2]
    knocklessmonster Link
    Nullpomino is a really awesome, open-source, cross-platform Tetris game. It's written in Java, but it does everything Tetris can/has ever done. I got bit by the Tetris bug a few days before...

    Nullpomino is a really awesome, open-source, cross-platform Tetris game. It's written in Java, but it does everything Tetris can/has ever done. I got bit by the Tetris bug a few days before Tetris99 came out (T99 has just helped feed my new addiction), but nullpomino is great for laid back gaming, or exploring different ways to play Tetris. Alternatively, jstris is free, but I don't know if it is open source, and supports 20-player multiplayer, as well as the major single-player modes of Tetris (practice, marathon, various sprints, etc).

    panel-pop, an C++/SDL version of Panel de Pon, or "Tetris Attack" and "Puzzle League" as it was known here. It's a solid port. It's not as polished as NullPomino is, though, but it's effective.

    Warzone 2100 is a commercial game that later got a full source code and data release, and is still maintained, 20 years after its release. It plays kind of like StarCraft, but with a tech-tree to progress through, rather than just a dependency chain. It's not as cumbersome as it may seem. I showed a buddy of mine the game a few years ago, because he was into StarCraft, and he actually loved the game.

    5 votes
    1. DashEquals Link Parent
      Love Nullpomino, it's what Tetris Ultimate should have been.

      Love Nullpomino, it's what Tetris Ultimate should have been.

      1 vote
  14. rogue_cricket Link
    One game I enjoyed for a while was Liberal Crime Squad. It's made by the same folks as Dwarf Fortress, although it predates it (it was made in 2004) and it's quite a lot simpler. It's a...

    One game I enjoyed for a while was Liberal Crime Squad. It's made by the same folks as Dwarf Fortress, although it predates it (it was made in 2004) and it's quite a lot simpler. It's a squad-based RPG based off of Oubliette with a lot of management aspects.

    http://lcs.wikidot.com/ <- here is the wiki, which also has links to versions on the front page.

    (It is political, of course, but it's so over-the-top that it just comes off as silly, which seems to be the intent. I wouldn't say it advocates any particular thing any more than Mortal Kombat advocates ripping out spines, it's just exaggerated for the sake of being exaggerated.)

    4 votes
  15. MimicSquid Link
    It's not open source, but I strongly recommend Kingdom of Loathing It's been going strong since 2006, and is a repository of humor that's worth checking out

    It's not open source, but I strongly recommend Kingdom of Loathing It's been going strong since 2006, and is a repository of humor that's worth checking out

    4 votes
  16. Ephemere Link
    I've been a fan of bzflag for years, generally as something to spin up during a long meeting. The biggest advantage to it, silly as it will sound, is that you can go from thinking 'I want to play...

    I've been a fan of bzflag for years, generally as something to spin up during a long meeting. The biggest advantage to it, silly as it will sound, is that you can go from thinking 'I want to play bzflag' to being in an online match in 2-4s on a modern desktop.

    The downside is that I've noticed the playerbase is perhaps in terminal decline, but you can still find a game or two.

    3 votes
  17. [2]
    heady Link
    The OpenRA re-implementation of Command & Conquer Red Alert is a great nostalgic RTS with a active community. Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory is now open source but a lot harder to find players.

    The OpenRA re-implementation of Command & Conquer Red Alert is a great nostalgic RTS with a active community.

    Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory is now open source but a lot harder to find players.

    3 votes
  18. Maven Link
    Zero-K, it's free and I'm pretty sure open source too. It's an RTS, a bit like starcraft except there's a bazillion macros and scripts to partially automate all the boring micro stuff so you can...

    Zero-K, it's free and I'm pretty sure open source too. It's an RTS, a bit like starcraft except there's a bazillion macros and scripts to partially automate all the boring micro stuff so you can spend more time on the interesting strategy parts.

    3 votes
  19. tobylane Link
    CorsixTH is a OpenTTD-like clone of Theme Hospital, a British game from 1997. The single player is almost complete, many improvements and fixes beyond the original. There are still some remaining...

    CorsixTH is a OpenTTD-like clone of Theme Hospital, a British game from 1997. The single player is almost complete, many improvements and fixes beyond the original. There are still some remaining coding tasks if you like C++/Lua.

    2 votes
  20. [2]
    hungariantoast Link
    I'm just going to make a new comment instead of editing my current one, because what else could I do except to bump this topic? KeeperRL is an interesting and fun dungeon management game with a...

    I'm just going to make a new comment instead of editing my current one, because what else could I do except to bump this topic?

    KeeperRL is an interesting and fun dungeon management game with a bunch of different ways to play, including as a lone adventurer.

    It's available on different platforms for around $15, but is actually open source, hosted on GitHub and offers the full version of the game, just with no sound and ASCII graphics instead of its nice tileset, for free from its website.

    The next update is going to introduce Z-levels similar to Dwarf Fortress, which should change the game quite a bit.

    I have not played it much, despite having bought the game a long time ago, but I found myself playing it more recently and despite still being in alpha, it's a good game. Development is very active so it's definitely something to keep an eye on as it moves towards implementing even more features.

    2 votes
    1. AlastrionaCatskill Link Parent
      I've never heard of that one before but that sounds like Dwarf Fortress as the goblins instead of dwarves. I want it.

      I've never heard of that one before but that sounds like Dwarf Fortress as the goblins instead of dwarves. I want it.

      1 vote
  21. [2]
    Beagon Link
    For nostalgia: https://openrct2.org - Fun to play solo https://www.openttd.org - Fun to play with friends or on a random server against people around the world.

    For nostalgia:
    https://openrct2.org - Fun to play solo

    https://www.openttd.org - Fun to play with friends or on a random server against people around the world.

    2 votes
    1. knocklessmonster Link Parent
      Worth mentioning: OpenRCT2 only needs the game data, which can be had from the demo. You didn't mention it, but it may make somebody more interested if they want to play.

      Worth mentioning: OpenRCT2 only needs the game data, which can be had from the demo. You didn't mention it, but it may make somebody more interested if they want to play.

      3 votes
  22. [3]
    what (edited ) Link
    osu! is my favourite rhythm game. It has a few different modes, but the main mode is where you move the mouse around and tap with the keyboard to click on circles and sliders around the screen....

    osu! is my favourite rhythm game. It has a few different modes, but the main mode is where you move the mouse around and tap with the keyboard to click on circles and sliders around the screen.

    The game is completely free, and while the current client (which IIRC is ~10 years old now) is closed-source, the entire game is being written from scratch, and it's all open-source.

    1 vote
    1. [2]
      hungariantoast Link Parent
      Psssst Your formatting for the link is buggered

      Psssst

      Your formatting for the link is buggered

      2 votes
      1. what Link Parent
        Thank you, fixed :)

        Thank you, fixed :)

        1 vote