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  • Showing only topics with the tag "early access". Back to normal view
    1. How would you feel about companies releasing "game concepts" for you to test?

      What is a "game concept": visually-unpolished but functional game costs little compared to the full product only basic UI and UX solid, release-worthy mechanics released publicly in order to test...

      What is a "game concept":

      • visually-unpolished but functional game
      • costs little compared to the full product
      • only basic UI and UX
      • solid, release-worthy mechanics
      • released publicly in order to test a particular kind of gameplay (standalone, not part of any other game)
      • retracted once the testing period is over
      • testers get 50% off purchasing or updating to the polished, complete game (possibly also in-game perks)

      Pros:

      • game design team gets to test quirkier ideas without the investment of a full game
      • mostly prevents flops (idiocy and hubris can still lead on)

      Cons:

      • players have to pay in order to participate (fewer players will want to join)
      • game is retracted after testing is over (may cause player discontentment)

      The essence of early access. Relevant to titles anywhere between AAA and indie (though more suited to AAA). Good early tests generate publicity. Bad tests are not as bad a publicity due to disclosed status.

      Thoughts?

      14 votes
    2. Do you restrict your game purchases to avoid early access?

      A couple of years ago I had the itch for a 3D platformer and didn't feel like replaying Super Mario 64 for the nth time. I saw that there was a game called Poi and it was clearly inspired by SM64....

      A couple of years ago I had the itch for a 3D platformer and didn't feel like replaying Super Mario 64 for the nth time. I saw that there was a game called Poi and it was clearly inspired by SM64. I picked it up and played it while it was in early access.

      I enjoyed my time with it, but because the game wasn't content and feature complete, I ended up making my way through an unfinished, buggy version. This is not a complaint, as I knew well that it was still in development, but I can't deny that it hampered my enjoyment of the final product. When I finally sat down to play through the game for the "first" time after its release, my previous experience soured my current one because I was retreading familiar, albeit improved, levels.

      Distance, another early access game I purchased, released in full this past month. Unlike with Poi, I actually stopped myself from playing Distance in early access (after trying it out briefly), so that I wouldn't ruin the game for myself. As such, my enjoyment of it has been far greater. Those two games, plus a handful of others, have made it such that I pretty much will no longer buy a game if it's in early access, simply because I'd rather wait for the full thing.

      With that in mind, I'm curious if other people do the same thing, or if some people actually like the behind the scenes experience of playing a game as it gets built? Also, what are some early access success stories that have had solid, full releases? What are some that would be considered successes in spite of the fact that they haven't fully released yet?

      12 votes
    3. Beat Saber released in Early Access

      @beatsaber: 🎉 🎉 We just released Beat Saber on Steam & Oculus Store! Thank you for your support & excitement. Enjoy! 🙌 #VR #BeatSaber Beat Saber on Steam: https://t.co/tOB2rdtref Beat Saber on Oculus Store: https://t.co/h9nsHSBGdG Beat Saber Original Soundtrack: https://t.co/kIx3aHquzW https://t.co/AEsCnjAOrf

      5 votes