25 votes

Life during the outbreak

How's everyone doing?

I'm feeling quite a bit of stress and mental burnout, so I wanted to post an "off my chest" style thread. Figured I'd keep it for the comments; maybe others could use the space, too.

(Posted in ~talk as I don't think it's productive to post this to ~health.coronavirus)

42 comments

  1. Deimos
    Link
    I'm going to set up a "daily coronavirus chat/questions/etc." thread starting tomorrow (in ~health.coronavirus). I think it'll be good just for general conversations like this, talking about how...

    I'm going to set up a "daily coronavirus chat/questions/etc." thread starting tomorrow (in ~health.coronavirus). I think it'll be good just for general conversations like this, talking about how the situation looks wherever you live, smaller questions and updates, and so on.

    25 votes
  2. [5]
    Adys
    Link
    To preface this comment, I want to highlight that I'm not an at-risk person, and I don't feel particularly worried about catching the virus. If I get it, I'll ride it out, and I'm very unlikely to...

    To preface this comment, I want to highlight that I'm not an at-risk person, and I don't feel particularly worried about catching the virus. If I get it, I'll ride it out, and I'm very unlikely to have complications. I don't actively live with anyone, so I don't even have to worry about infecting people either as long as I stay home. Rather, I've been feeling stress at the situation. For the first time in my life, I'm severely worried about what the world might look like two, three weeks from now.

    Last week, I felt like I got hit by a truck when I realized how serious things were getting in my country of residence (Belgium). A three week lockdown had been announced. I guess I didn't really think, or want to think, about the likelihood of it happening; I knew it could happen but I figured we were done trying to contain it. In retrospect, that was very poorly thought out.

    This is the truck that hit me today. Macron's words especially made me shiver:

    “Never before in history has France had to take such exceptional measures in a time of peace,” Macron said. “You will no longer be able to see your loved ones… or continue your daily routine.”

    What's scariest is that it's 15 days "for now". I think we're all trying to think it's only going to be 15 days, but without anyone really saying it out loud, we're all wondering "could it be more?". And I can't help but think that in a couple of days, Belgium's likely to follow suit.

    I sometimes sit down to do some math. I think about the likelihood that we only know about maybe at best 10% of all cases on average (most countries don't have the testing apparatus to do any more than test the most at-risk people and those already showing severe symptoms). How it puts us at nearly 2 million cases, and how that's probably still a low estimate considering the incubation period. My most optimistic math puts the final number around 15M infections, with the more pessimistic end adding a zero to it.

    Don't get me wrong… this too shall pass. We're all… reasonably certain that it'll pass. Hopefully in a matter of months most will be back to thinking less about the virus than about the new bullshit-du-jour in politics or TV or what not. Maybe not, maybe it'll last longer… a year, maybe two before we have a gen-pop vaccine. Yikes.

    I'm also personally trying to see the silver lining. Maybe the antivax movement will shut the fuck up for a while. Maybe certain countries will understand the importance of universal health care (I have a small bet that UHC in the US will become bipartisan within the next 12 months). Maybe various lifestyle changes (such as WFH) will stick around longer and we'll see environmental and personal benefits from that. Maybe we've also in general been too complacent, taking far too much of our daily comforts for granted, and this will all help pull the world to be globally friendlier and more careful with itself.

    Or maybe something more rotten is hiding three weeks down the line. All these border lockdowns making europeans feel a bit less european. And Americans, who are likely to suffer the most from the outbreak, who knows what the US will look like by then…

    I feel a lot more connected to the rest of the world than even before, so there's that. Yesterday I had a new yorker call me for work-related reasons; don't know him at all, but we ended up talking for a couple mins about what the local lockdown is like in NY and in Brussels.

    In the mean time, I'm making the best of the quarantine by finding time for the things I definitely left hanging for far too long. Work and house-work. I really hope I'm overreacting.

    18 votes
    1. Amarok
      Link Parent
      One other tiny silver lining is the dramatic reduction in global carbon emissions. The last time something like this happened was when all air travel was grounded for 9/11. That provided some...

      One other tiny silver lining is the dramatic reduction in global carbon emissions. The last time something like this happened was when all air travel was grounded for 9/11. That provided some interesting and useful data for climate scientists. I wonder if we'll learn anything new this time around.

      8 votes
    2. wycy
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Your thoughts and feelings closely echo mine. I’m also sleeping worse. It is strange not really knowing even roughly what the future of society looks like 2-3 months from now. As for the part...

      Your thoughts and feelings closely echo mine. I’m also sleeping worse. It is strange not really knowing even roughly what the future of society looks like 2-3 months from now.

      As for the part about UHC ever becoming bipartisan in the US... not a chance. The brainwash is strong, and the money behind the brainwash is immense. Hundreds of thousands of people are going to go out tomorrow (Tuesday) in many US states and risk their lives to vote against UHC during a pandemic.

      7 votes
    3. Parliament
      Link Parent
      The lack of personal control over the greater situation is what rattles me. It's like if I took that pang of fear I experience during serious airplane turbulence and stretched it over entire days...

      Rather, I've been feeling stress at the situation. For the first time in my life, I'm severely worried about what the world might look like two, three weeks from now.

      The lack of personal control over the greater situation is what rattles me. It's like if I took that pang of fear I experience during serious airplane turbulence and stretched it over entire days and weeks.

      What's scariest is that it's 15 days "for now". I think we're all trying to think it's only going to be 15 days, but without anyone really saying it out loud, we're all wondering "could it be more?". And I can't help but think that in a couple of days, Belgium's likely to follow suit.

      Absolutely. We started self-quarantining on Friday, and since then, I've begun mentally preparing for 2 months, not just 2 weeks. The White House press conference yesterday and announcements in other countries reinforced that. The county school system here went ahead and extended the shutdown from 2 weeks to a full month yesterday as well, and it's only a matter of time before every other organization, including my son's daycare, follows suit. I'm glad they made that announcement now rather than setting unreasonable expectations for people that this would be a 2 week situation, especially because a lot of other groups are taking cues from the school system.

      7 votes
    4. Algernon_Asimov
      Link Parent
      I was talking to my manager about half an hour ago (by phone, of course). Our company is about to recommend all head office employees work from home, starting next week (if not sooner). She said...

      I think we're all trying to think it's only going to be 15 days, but without anyone really saying it out loud, we're all wondering "could it be more?".

      I was talking to my manager about half an hour ago (by phone, of course). Our company is about to recommend all head office employees work from home, starting next week (if not sooner). She said it's for 2 weeks, but then she said that it will probably last longer. Some of our state governments have activated a "state of emergency" for 4 weeks, but have openly said it could last longer. The message is out there: this isn't a short-term problem.

      4 votes
  3. knocklessmonster
    Link
    I've broken out in tears twice today. It never turns into full crying, but I've had several moments of pure helplessness. I know it's coming from a general anxiety over this whole thing, and I'm...

    I've broken out in tears twice today. It never turns into full crying, but I've had several moments of pure helplessness. I know it's coming from a general anxiety over this whole thing, and I'm doing a good job, for the most part, of managing it except for an occasional moment of weakness.

    I try to bury myself in data to know that it's not that bad, and limit myself to hour-long periods on /r/coronavirus to understand what's going on. I can manage a few sessions a day at less than an hour each, but have to space them out. I'm watching the American response, specifically in my home state of California, to know what's going to happen, and what kind of policies are going to make their way through the state. Fortunately, most of the news seems to be good, even with the US preparing to deal with a substantially large series of state- or county-mandated lockdowns.

    I find maintaining little bits of normalcy helps a lot. Shave my head and neck (I have a beard, so not the face). Brush my teeth. Report to my now virtual classes on time. I'm worried about possibly cracking if this goes on too long, but that's some sort of meta-anxiety I'm really trying to learn to control, as it seems to be most of my problem.

    I'm not worried about the virus itself, but the local shortages it's causing, and the trouble it's causing because the people who weren't paying attention are now suddenly panicking, even though it won't be so bad if my state goes on a full Italy-style lockdown, which is pretty much the worst-case scenario at this point, and likely to happen.

    13 votes
  4. [3]
    rogue_cricket
    Link
    I'll be honest, it's not great. My grandfather passed away on Friday. I have been advised to self-isolate for two weeks and dealing with this without visiting my close and extended family has been...

    I'll be honest, it's not great.

    My grandfather passed away on Friday. I have been advised to self-isolate for two weeks and dealing with this without visiting my close and extended family has been really, really hard. I am working on a solution so that his funeral and services can be live streamed. I am exhausted.

    13 votes
    1. [2]
      patience_limited
      Link Parent
      I'm sorry to hear that you lost someone you loved, and might have been exposed as well. As connected as we are, it's not a substitute for the presence of family. I hope you can make the video...

      I'm sorry to hear that you lost someone you loved, and might have been exposed as well. As connected as we are, it's not a substitute for the presence of family.

      I hope you can make the video contact work. The free version of Zoom will let you host up to 100 participants, but limits recording time. It functioned pretty well when we tested it for work a few years ago.

      4 votes
      1. rogue_cricket
        Link Parent
        Thank you for your kind comment and suggestion. I actually work for a competitor to Zoom, although of course everyone should use what suits them best. :) So I am set on that front - my workplace...

        Thank you for your kind comment and suggestion. I actually work for a competitor to Zoom, although of course everyone should use what suits them best. :) So I am set on that front - my workplace has even kindly allowed me to borrow some of our test cameras.

        5 votes
  5. [4]
    Algernon_Asimov
    Link
    I realised last night, while watching yet another television show about the coronavirus, that I've been devouring too much news about the coronavirus. It's making me anxious (it also didn't help...

    I realised last night, while watching yet another television show about the coronavirus, that I've been devouring too much news about the coronavirus. It's making me anxious (it also didn't help that I was over-tired last night because I'd woken up ridiculously early to buy toilet paper). My response to any situation which I'm nervous about is to acquire information. "Knowledge is power" is very personal for me. I always need to know what's going on. Unfortunately, right now, that habit is working against me. Up to a point, having knowledge is good for me. However, I've gone beyond that point. I need to pull back. I don't need to live in an information vacuum, but I need to stop devouring every single article and television show about the pandemic. I need to keep myself informed, but I need to step back and take a breather every now and then.

    As background: I'm not in a high-risk demographic, but I'm also not a low-risk case. For a couple of reasons, I have a non-negligible risk of developing complications if I get infected - as does my housemate. So, we're both taking precautions. I can work from home, but he can't. Luckily, because of his health circumstances, he's already slightly germophobic and he already has good hygiene practices (I never used hand sanitiser before a couple of weeks ago, but he's been a regular user of it for years). But we're both sitting here hoping that neither of us catches it, because we're very likely to infect each other in the pre-symptomatic phase.

    11 votes
    1. Adys
      Link Parent
      Me too. I'm pretty conscious about it, and I hope most of my stress is because of overconsumption. But it's hard not to. It's such a fascinating, once-in-a-lifetime event. I want to learn. I want...

      I realised last night, while watching yet another television show about the coronavirus, that I've been devouring too much news about the coronavirus.

      Me too. I'm pretty conscious about it, and I hope most of my stress is because of overconsumption. But it's hard not to. It's such a fascinating, once-in-a-lifetime event. I want to learn. I want to know if there's something I can do to help (I contacted the national hospital for COVID-19 treatment to offer them my company's services for free). I want to be able to talk to my grandkids about this, tell them what it was like.

      8 votes
    2. [2]
      joplin
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I live with someone like you - anxious about the situation (and she is high-risk, unfortunately), likes having more information. She's very annoyed with her family (all in other parts of the...

      I live with someone like you - anxious about the situation (and she is high-risk, unfortunately), likes having more information. She's very annoyed with her family (all in other parts of the country) who don't seem to be taking things quite as seriously (though they are taking it seriously), and won't stop reading articles about it. Do you or anyone else have suggestions on how to help her put the brakes on the constant reading about it and work on the anxiety about it?

      To give some perspective, she has an immune condition, and she's been basically a shut-in for the past 6 months or more. (We sometimes can do a short 10-15 minute trip to a store to pick up a specific item we need, but anything longer drains her.) I've been working from home for over a week and literally haven't gone anywhere (other than walking the dog around the block) during that time.

      A person who works on the same corporate campus as me has tested positive, but I'm pretty sure that happened after I had already started working at home and they didn't work in the same building as me. The company claims to have contacted everyone they had contact with, and I didn't get a call!

      In any event, I want to help her feel less stress about the situation while being respectful of the fact that she is in a high risk group and it is a bigger deal for her than me or her other family members. If you have any suggestions on how to help, please let me know.

      Edit: Just saw your response further down about this article which I am reading now. Thanks!

      4 votes
      1. Algernon_Asimov
        Link Parent
        Sadly, I don't. I didn't do anything magic or special. I just decided not to read every article and not to watch every show about the coronavirus. I used to open every article on my subscribed...

        Do you or anyone else have suggestions on how to help her put the brakes on the constant reading about it and work on the anxiety about it?

        Sadly, I don't. I didn't do anything magic or special.

        I just decided not to read every article and not to watch every show about the coronavirus. I used to open every article on my subscribed news site that even mentioned the coronavirus. Now I just open the ones that I think matter. I used to keep my news site open all day, and continually check it for updates. Now I just check it two or three times a day. I used to watch every news/current affairs show about the coronavirus. Now I avoid them. As an added measure, I unsubscribed from the ~health.coronavirus group here, so I can only see those posts when I deliberately seek them out.

        I don't have any special tricks. I just made a decision not to read/watch everything about the coronavirus. Sorry I can't help your housemate. :(

        4 votes
  6. [3]
    skybrian
    Link
    My wife and I went for a walk today at a local hill. While driving to the trailhead, there was a long line outside the local branch of a major bank. It's quite a busy branch, but a line outside is...

    My wife and I went for a walk today at a local hill. While driving to the trailhead, there was a long line outside the local branch of a major bank. It's quite a busy branch, but a line outside is unusual. They did seem somewhat spread out.

    On the trail, people waved but kept their distance, mostly. Usually we see a lot of dog-walkers and there were some, but we also saw a few families and that's unusual. I took a picture of some dog-walkers (from a distance) and one of them asked whether it would be on social media. I didn't hear her, but my wife said no. Since then I've deleted it.

    The view was great, very dramatic due to being partly cloudy. I took pictures to send relatives. We thought there were fewer planes than usual, but there were a few, so hard to tell. Nothing looked wrong from the top of the hill.

    We were fairly cautious about touching anything. At the end of the hike there is a chain link fence, and when we got close, I would sometimes race my wife to it and touch it. She would run up to it and not touch it, and I would tease her about it, and she would tease me about insisting that it's important to touch it. This time, we didn't run, and neither of us touched it.

    When we drove home, the line was still there at the bank.


    I'm thinking that I'd like to go again tomorrow. I wonder if it will be possible?

    According to the lockdown order, all "non-essential" travel will be illegal. I'm wondering if that includes driving to a trailhead? Travel is "including, but not limited to, travel on foot, bicycle, scooter, motorcycle, automobile, or public transit, except Essential Travel and Essential Activities as defined below."

    One of the exceptions is "To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running."

    Although "All public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a household or living unit are prohibited," I guess we don't need to do it separately, because although "All public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a household or living unit" are prohibited, "Nothing in this Order prohibits the gathering of members of a household or living unit."

    I'm not a lawyer though, and perhaps there is some better source of guidance in this matter.

    9 votes
    1. Algernon_Asimov
      Link Parent
      It sounds like your nature walk is not only allowed, but encouraged. The writers of the lockdown order wouldn't have included this clause if they didn't want people to take advantage of the...

      One of the exceptions is "To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running."

      It sounds like your nature walk is not only allowed, but encouraged. The writers of the lockdown order wouldn't have included this clause if they didn't want people to take advantage of the outdoors. It's even listed as one of the "Essential Activities". "Essential" implies the authorities think this sort of activity is necessary for people.

      Enjoy!

      You're making me think that I need to talk a walk in our local botanical gardens. We've got nice weather this week. It's exactly the right time to get outdoors.

      5 votes
    2. Parliament
      Link Parent
      Something about this struck me. My wife and I have changed small behaviors like that too, either consciously or subconsciously. We live across the street from a park, and although we've gone out...

      We were fairly cautious about touching anything. At the end of the hike there is a chain link fence, and when we got close, I would sometimes race my wife to it and touch it. She would run up to it and not touch it, and I would tease her about it, and she would tease me about insisting that it's important to touch it. This time, we didn't run, and neither of us touched it.

      Something about this struck me. My wife and I have changed small behaviors like that too, either consciously or subconsciously. We live across the street from a park, and although we've gone out for our normal walk around the park and neighborhood every day since starting the self-quarantine on Friday, we haven't sat at the covered tables (or let our son) like we normally do. And that decision was entirely unspoken and understood between the two of us.

      There's also a monument/art-installation type thing at the other end of the park that our son usually climbs on. Haven't let him do that either, again unspoken but understood.

      Definitely enjoy that time outside every day if you can though - I think it's the key to avoiding stir craze over the coming weeks. I plan to ride my bike around a bit when it stops pouring rain for more than an hour.

      4 votes
  7. Surira
    Link
    Not having a great time with this. The shelter in place announcement in the bay area came out on my birthday, and I also had a not-so-great day at work, with a manager's manager being a dick on a...

    Not having a great time with this. The shelter in place announcement in the bay area came out on my birthday, and I also had a not-so-great day at work, with a manager's manager being a dick on a presentation I was leading... But I realize I'm super privileged to be able to work from home and not have to worry about losing my livelihood (for now... my business unit is kinda fucked if you ask me, but that's just me for now). I started a job search, but that's probably not going to be fruitful for now.

    On top of that, my whole family is in another part of the US, and they're suggested I drive home and shelter there. That seems irresponsible to me, since being in one of the epicenters of the disease in the US means I could be a carrier and not know it.

    At the same time though, I have an underlying condition that means if I get it, I could much more easily die than your standard youngish person, so it sort of makes sense to go home where my family has a bit more ability to influence medical decisions than a random caretaker where I live now...

    Anyway, it's been a shitty birthday, so hopefully I can look back in a year from now and see this as a unique memory of sorts. Stay safe, Tilderinos

    9 votes
  8. moocow1452
    Link
    Work doesn't care. The numbers are red so that means they're giving out overtime like candy after Halloween, the girl hacking up a lung next to me is first in line and the guy who has asthma next...

    Work doesn't care. The numbers are red so that means they're giving out overtime like candy after Halloween, the girl hacking up a lung next to me is first in line and the guy who has asthma next to me couldn't call in because he needs this job or is too in love with his pride or something. And the worst part is that we are contracted to work with a medical company that's probably working on a test and having everyone who can work from home, because they keep calling in for VPN help. Fucking hell, this sucks and if someone gets afflicted, I hope the CDC comes in with hazmat suits and starts busting heads.

    One of our team is going to talk to HR and maybe we can start taking towers homes if we don't have enough laptops to go around.

    9 votes
  9. [3]
    patience_limited
    (edited )
    Link
    I'm... not panicking? There's enough knowledge squirreled away in my head that I think I'm realistically concerned, but also optimistic that COVID-19 and its sequelae will not be the end of...

    I'm... not panicking? There's enough knowledge squirreled away in my head that I think I'm realistically concerned, but also optimistic that COVID-19 and its sequelae will not be the end of civilization as we know it. As /u/Adys said, there might be some silver lining to the situation - maybe the revelation that the emperor wears no clothes will lead to real political change starting in November.

    It may be that I'm still a little numb, but I'm very glad I started rationing my news exposure and trimming my sources in January. I'm already seeing bad habits start again with the pandemic, but I feel like I've got better emotional separation with respect to what I can and can't control.

    I'm a little stir-crazy because the pool, gym, and physical therapy are shut down, but I'm getting out to walk, weather permitting. The town I'm in is remote enough that there are no cases yet, but connected enough that the local hospital system now has a testing site and isolation rooms/ventilators ready. The state's governor has shown both foresight and compassion. Today, she ordered expanded sick/childcare leave and unemployment compensation, with small business aid under discussion. Michigan communities might pull through this time, without all the disasters of a 2008-style crash.

    Spouse's employment is secure right now (he's crazy busy). We're both over 50; aside from non-critical issues, in good general health. That's no guarantee of safety, but we're not especially at risk, and don't have dependents or elderly relations.

    By comparison with most people in the U.S., I'm very fortunate, and trying to concentrate on gratitude.

    I've spoken or corresponded today with friends who are more or less in the middle of the crisis - people afraid of getting sick, losing their jobs, or inundated with work and/or childcare.

    One is an academic culinary program director whose students are out the costs of a semester of school, and unable to work or find jobs when they were supposed to graduate in three weeks.

    One of my former staff is working from home, as is his wife, with their five-month-old baby; he's now confronted with essential work travel he can't refuse.

    A perinatologist is struggling to take care of women with complicated pregnancies when she can't safely book them for hospital deliveries and C-sections if things go wrong. She isn't even considering her own risks, and has always been someone I thought of as a medical hero.

    A close friend is agitated because she lost a family member to pneumonia two weeks ago, and there were no tests at the time. Her mother is 70+ and medically fragile. She's also trying to keep phone service working for hundreds of medical clinics and get new ones set up - the environment is challenging right now.

    My biggest emotional response is generally simmering rage - at rotten economic and political systems; carefully cultivated public ignorance, distrust and confusion; lack of systemic resiliency; and other failures to acknowledge basic scientific reality. I'm angry that I can't do much to help or control the situation, besides venting here.

    8 votes
    1. [2]
      joplin
      Link Parent
      I'm glad there are no cases near you! I have family near Kalamazoo, and there have been confirmed cases there. Last I heard, family was all doing well.

      I'm glad there are no cases near you! I have family near Kalamazoo, and there have been confirmed cases there. Last I heard, family was all doing well.

      2 votes
      1. patience_limited
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        I'm now wrong, there's three confirmed cases in the county as of 6:00 p.m. today, based on updated numbers here. As I said, we're connected. Edit: This is going to change fast.

        I'm now wrong, there's three confirmed cases in the county as of 6:00 p.m. today, based on updated numbers here. As I said, we're connected.

        Edit: This is going to change fast.

        3 votes
  10. Gibdeck
    Link
    UK: I'm starting to get a little worried - we're moving this coming weekend which just compounds things. We were in 3 different shops yesterday and all of the toilet paper, canned goods and even...

    UK: I'm starting to get a little worried - we're moving this coming weekend which just compounds things. We were in 3 different shops yesterday and all of the toilet paper, canned goods and even the meat isles looked like they had been ransacked. Shelves completely empty.

    I'm now starting to wonder whether I should have been stocking up like all the other fuckwits. Would they even close the shops altogether?

    It's not the virus stressing me, it's the people's crazy fucking reaction to it.

    8 votes
  11. [4]
    Silbern
    Link
    To be quite honest, I know this is super selfish as a relatively healthy young person living in a super remote place to think, but I'm actually having a pretty good time so far. The virus has...

    To be quite honest, I know this is super selfish as a relatively healthy young person living in a super remote place to think, but I'm actually having a pretty good time so far. The virus has effectively shut down my university for the time being, and with some local businesses closing and tourism dropping off, it's given me a lot of R&R time recently since there isn't really a lot to do. Far from feeling burned out, this has been a great opportunity to detach from the usual schedule and take some time to catch up on stuff I've been putting off for a while, and to just revel in being bored for once.

    Obviously it sucks for everyone who's losing their loved ones, and I worry quite a bit about the economic impact this pandemic may leave behind (the US stock market has become extremely volatile over the last couple weeks, and even our usual steady bedrocks in government bonds are weakening), but I've been wondering if it wouldn't be healthy for us to do this more often. If, as busy and chaotic as modern societies are, if it wouldn't be great if we could shut everything down for a few weeks once in a while.

    7 votes
    1. Adys
      Link Parent
      I don't think it's selfish, and personally I'm really glad for anyone who can get a positive out of the lockdowns and the social distancing in general.

      I don't think it's selfish, and personally I'm really glad for anyone who can get a positive out of the lockdowns and the social distancing in general.

      5 votes
    2. [2]
      skybrian
      Link Parent
      I am feeling oddly energized, at least now that I'm getting enough sleep. I've always been a bit of a news junkie, and now I have something big and important to think about, and also real-life...

      I am feeling oddly energized, at least now that I'm getting enough sleep. I've always been a bit of a news junkie, and now I have something big and important to think about, and also real-life choices to make. It's important not to overdo it on news, though.

      5 votes
      1. UniquelyGeneric
        Link Parent
        I too have gotten a spurt of energy from the past few weeks. Perhaps it's the break from routine, or the existential awareness everywhere you go, but I've been trying to direct the energy to...

        I too have gotten a spurt of energy from the past few weeks. Perhaps it's the break from routine, or the existential awareness everywhere you go, but I've been trying to direct the energy to something more productive.

        Since I've started WFH I've spent more time in my room and with my desk than I usually do, and it's gotten me to see areas of improvement, which is helping me envision my new apartment when I move in a few months. I've also gotten around to doing some digital housekeeping and taking care of the odds and ends that drive my hobbies and projects online. I even did my taxes today!

        The only left to do is to try to write some more music, but sharing an apartment with others 24/7 has made me more conscious of the noise I make, so unfortunately I have not made much progress on that front.

        6 votes
  12. Arshan
    Link
    I live in the middle of the US, and this weekend was the first time I noticed anything in my day to day life. I went grocery shopping and so many food staples were just gone; I got the LAST bag of...

    I live in the middle of the US, and this weekend was the first time I noticed anything in my day to day life. I went grocery shopping and so many food staples were just gone; I got the LAST bag of rice. One of my roomates worked from home today. Other than that, my current intentional unemployment means that I haven't been getting out that much anyway, and I am not worried about losing a job.

    I considered the odds of a significant infectious outbreak of this scale to be inevitable, so I am not overwhelmed like most people seem to be. To be honest, I thought more people assumed the same; that globalization would lead to a fast moving outbreak at some point. Even historically, it is my understanding that pandemics at a global scale are, roughly, a per century thing.

    So, yeah I guess I am personally feeling pretty okay, but I do hope everyone in more serious situations can find some peace.

    5 votes
  13. Gyrfalcon
    Link
    Things have been a little complex for me because I'm planning to start a new job in a few weeks, but that job is approximately 1,100 miles from where I live now, and I need to go home for a while...

    Things have been a little complex for me because I'm planning to start a new job in a few weeks, but that job is approximately 1,100 miles from where I live now, and I need to go home for a while first to clear out my room and things before I move. The added complication is that my parents, while not in the prime risk group, are definitely old enough that their risk is higher, and the temporary job I'm finishing up with today is in retail. Oh, and the state where home is is having a rough time of it, so we'll see if I can even get in by the time I'm ready to go.

    I'm just going to try to get going as soon as I can, and break the drive up into chunks so I can manage it on my own. If I bring some food, buy some more in grocery stores along the way, and stay in hotel rooms alone, I think I can minimize my potential as a disease vector and get to my destination safely.

    5 votes
  14. cwagner
    Link
    I treat it as a game. Not because I’m callous, but because I feel that it helps my mental well-being. When life gives you lemons… I look at the statistics and maps and cheer for new cases, Germany...

    I treat it as a game. Not because I’m callous, but because I feel that it helps my mental well-being. When life gives you lemons… I look at the statistics and maps and cheer for new cases, Germany is currently rank 6 and it’s a race to try to catch up to Spain.

    Of course, my approach won’t work for everyone, I already worked from home and my wife studied from home. And eating out is far less common here than for example in the USA. Day to day life barely changed for us even with the upcoming shutdown.

    The EU will announce a ban of travel into the bloc today, Germany already closed some borders and after some states had already done a partial lockdown of places, we now have a federal shutdown of non-essential stores coming up.

    I have a general outlook of "If I can’t change it, I’ll take it." and it serves me very well.

    4 votes
  15. asoftbird
    (edited )
    Link
    Living in a medium sized Dutch city. Getting groceries is a hassle; I only have toilet paper after asking the local Aldi manager (a friend) to keep one pack in stock for me. Before this, I went to...

    Living in a medium sized Dutch city.

    Getting groceries is a hassle; I only have toilet paper after asking the local Aldi manager (a friend) to keep one pack in stock for me. Before this, I went to the shops every day and found an empty shelf every damn day.

    It stresses me out. Stressed out me gets anger attacks. Had to leave the store to avoid kicking the shit out of the empty shelves.

    Anyway, bread is another one of those things not available anywhere. Think I'll drive to another town and see if I can get bread there. Same for basic foods like rice, pasta, eggs. Nothing available.

    Seriously, if you're not in (semi-)lockdown yet: prepare and get some things. Don't hoard.

    Edit: elaborating a bit since I felt like it;

    I get angry from being too stressed. Not something that happens in daily life, ever. Last time this happened on a regular basis was when I was like 9 years old. In any case, the absolute smallest things make me pretty much just explode, like last week when the lockdown announcement came. I couldn't get the lid on the butter container in one try. Kicked a box across the room. It's really not fun to be so limited, and it's stressing everyone out. Friends (from the USA) told me there's been fights at stores, guns pulled. Someone over here also got stabbed for a similar reason. I'd say I kinda understand them even though it's obviously not ok to do that.

    4 votes
  16. Bullmaestro
    Link
    Brit here. I'm not high risk but I live with people who are, so that means I'd need to self-isolate so as to not put their lives in jeopardy. Not looking forward to the next three months. People...

    Brit here.

    I'm not high risk but I live with people who are, so that means I'd need to self-isolate so as to not put their lives in jeopardy.

    Not looking forward to the next three months. People have been panic buying supplies like mad over the past few weeks to the point where supermarket shelves are largely empty. Hand sanitiser is unobtainium here, while soap disappears from the shelves the moment any store gets a fresh supply.

    A WFH arrangement looks increasingly likely, which will complicate matters at work. I had hoped to apply for a team leader role that my boss posted recently but given that I'll probably need to work remotely soon, I have a feeling that will destroy my candidacy for it.

    2 votes
  17. [9]
    Kuromantis
    Link
    I almost don't leave home already, so whatever curfews they put on us, not much will change to me unless some serious stuff happens to the economy and fucks over my father's work, which admittedly...

    I almost don't leave home already, so whatever curfews they put on us, not much will change to me unless some serious stuff happens to the economy and fucks over my father's work, which admittedly seems quite likely, in which case lord knows he's the only source of income and since my country dodged the 2008 crisis I have no idea if they know how to handle such a thing, but since his job is thankfully only a staircase down since the first floor of my house is where he works, we're safe from public transport (or at least I hope.)

    Me(me)-irl Tl;dr just in case

    I keep optimism by telling myself "If it gets bad then only a minority of us will really suffer" and "those who suffer the most are old people who travel a lot like businesmen and corporate managers classes, who tend to vote and fund conservatives" which admittedly is "everyone I hate could die from pneumonia if the pandemic is bad enough and that's good" type accelerationism.

    1 vote
    1. [8]
      patience_limited
      Link Parent
      Back up a moment, my brother, I was a traveling corporate manager-class, and most of us don't vote conservative if we're in businesses where connection to reality (e.g. healthcare) is important. I...

      Back up a moment, my brother, I was a traveling corporate manager-class, and most of us don't vote conservative if we're in businesses where connection to reality (e.g. healthcare) is important. I don't think anyone deserves to suffer or die from this - the virus is an enemy of Humanity, and that's the most important thing we all need to focus on.

      6 votes
      1. [7]
        Kuromantis
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        OK, again, I'll admit that what I said is basically accelerationism (read: insanity) with a pinch of class war and 'oust trump at all costs' mixed in, same logic as that trump above moderates 2020...

        OK, again, I'll admit that what I said is basically accelerationism (read: insanity) with a pinch of class war and 'oust trump at all costs' mixed in, same logic as that trump above moderates 2020 post from way too long ago,with the same obvious criticism (you think you/your parents and grandparents won't suffer too) and this is probably logic that was used to justify the Holocaust and a lot of people would get caught in a crossfire if this were to actually happen, but if it takes an entire generation to get pneumonia for conservatives to reconsider their political beliefs, I honestly would probably pay that price.

        It can happen to pro-life mothers, it can happen to all the other conservatives as well, and God knows we need trump out in november and if it takes something like this to do it, I would honestly take it.

        1 vote
        1. [3]
          Algernon_Asimov
          Link Parent
          If it was just a matter of people catching pneumonia, it would be easier to accept your position. However, people have died, are dying, and will continue to die from this virus. About 3.4% of...

          if it takes an entire generation to get pneumonia for conservatives to reconsider their political beliefs, I honestly would probably pay that price.

          If it was just a matter of people catching pneumonia, it would be easier to accept your position. However, people have died, are dying, and will continue to die from this virus. About 3.4% of people who catch the virus will die. That's about 3 or 4 people out of every 100 people.

          How many people are in your town? Up to 70% of those people will catch the coronavirus. How many people is that? Now multiply that number by 3.4%. That's how many people will die... just in your town.

          How many people do you know? If you know 30 people, then one of those people will almost certainly die from this coronavirus (especially if your grandparents are included among those 30 people!)

          Your accelerationism is coming at the cost of people's lives, including people you know.

          Is ousting Trump worth people dying? Is it worth the death of one or more of your own grandparents?

          Would you die if it would oust Trump? Are you willing to sacrifice your life for this cause, just like you're willing to sacrifice other people's lives?

          8 votes
          1. [2]
            Kuromantis
            Link Parent
            Alright, I admit that I can't seriously take this to heart and can only stomach it because trump is probably an aspiring dictator with enough Republican support to succeed.

            I'll admit that what I said is basically accelerationism (read: insanity) with a pinch of class war and 'oust trump at all costs' mixed in, same logic as that trump above moderates 2020
            post from way too long ago, with the same obvious criticism (you think you/your parents and grandparents won't suffer too) and this is probably logic that was probably used to justify the Holocaust in the 1940s ("Old people dying is good because they're rich. I wouldn't be surprised if swapping old with Jewish is what the nazis used to justify the Holocaust) and a lot of people would get caught in the crossfire if this were to actually happen.

            Alright, I admit that I can't seriously take this to heart and can only stomach it because trump is probably an aspiring dictator with enough Republican support to succeed.

            1 vote
            1. Algernon_Asimov
              Link Parent
              Good to know. There are some things you just don't say, even if you're not serious. Wishing illness and death on millions of vulnerable people just to remove one politician from office is one of...

              Good to know.

              There are some things you just don't say, even if you're not serious. Wishing illness and death on millions of vulnerable people just to remove one politician from office is one of those things.

              6 votes
        2. [4]
          Comment deleted by author
          Link Parent
          1. [3]
            patience_limited
            Link Parent
            I appreciate the kind words but I'd like to note, for the benefit of all concerned, that /u/Kuromantis is 14 years old. I know I was just as extreme and nihilistic, if not more so, when Ronald...

            I appreciate the kind words but I'd like to note, for the benefit of all concerned, that /u/Kuromantis is 14 years old. I know I was just as extreme and nihilistic, if not more so, when Ronald Reagan was blithely waving nukes around. It's not going to help them if we dogpile on for a poorly considered post.

            This is a terrifying time, and it's too easy for all of us to head for the extremes in our responses. Let's be here for each other, and accept there will be times we can't keep the dark feelings under full control.

            7 votes
            1. [2]
              Kuromantis
              (edited )
              Link Parent
              Uhh... thanks... I guess... I only felt like I was being dogpiled When I realized you're the (uhh, what? Person I guess) that I replied to originally when you said you were an old managerial-class...

              Uhh... thanks... I guess...

              I only felt like I was being dogpiled When I realized you're the (uhh, what? Person I guess) that I replied to originally when you said you were an old managerial-class worker and you weren't a fox news libertarian nut. I will admit though that when you talked about Reagan my immediate reaction was 'Reagan took the law seriously, he wouldn't actually have tried anything, unlike trump'

              Back to naively(?) hoping Biden will win and the election will be fair.

              1 vote
              1. patience_limited
                Link Parent
                Somewhere up there, I mentioned that my biggest emotional reaction was simmering rage. I have a very clear grasp of just how badly the American political system, the current administration of...

                Somewhere up there, I mentioned that my biggest emotional reaction was simmering rage. I have a very clear grasp of just how badly the American political system, the current administration of madmen, and our dysfunctional instincts are f*cking people globally.

                I'm not going deeply into it here, but the Reagan presidency prototyped some of the lawlessness you're seeing under Trump, and did it while grandstanding with weapons that could literally wipe life off the Earth's face. "History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes." Yes, we desperately need to evict Trump and the Republicans - they're a danger to civilization (the nukes haven't gone away, climate change, etc.).

                At the same time, I deeply believe that there are far too many innocent bystanders who will be killed if we keep politicising COVID-19 response. All the science fiction stories about humanity coming together to fight alien invaders? Well, COVID-19 and similar threats are the aliens.

                Note: I'm 55, not 70 - not much need for excess concern here.

                5 votes