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  • Showing only topics with the tag "punk". Back to normal view
    1. Sharptooth - Transitional Forms (2020)

      Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/transitional-forms/1502187566 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/6pHXuiWvMSPTyBb0hHe8Yv?si=gPRk-8hoRD2qoFZI91LSfg YouTube:...

      Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/transitional-forms/1502187566
      Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/6pHXuiWvMSPTyBb0hHe8Yv?si=gPRk-8hoRD2qoFZI91LSfg
      YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYQhPJrQIlgNxrODF9mS-wAC5BS6jET0c

      Baltimore hardcore outfit Sharptooth is back with their sophomore effort and it's no slump. The riffs are crunchy as hell and the vocals are more brutal than ever. Remaining is Sharptooth's political edge, which is as sharp as ever. Stand out lyrics include "You're not a feminist just because you fucked one" and the album opener "This is a song about nothing/Oh no, not a single thing/'Cause in the absence of content/I hope that you'll forget/That all this shit never meant a thing."

      Lauren Kashan's vocals are vastly improved. Her unclean vox are much more guttural while her cleans include more harmonies and layered work. Fellow song writer of the group Lance Donati employs a lot of inverted power chords to keep the sound aggressive and explosive.

      For fans of political hardcore punk like Stray From the Path, seeyouspacecowboy, Knocked Loose and Every Time I Die.

      3 votes
    2. Taqwacore: the paradoxes of the punk Islam scene

      Hi folks, I was recently introduced (at a relatively superficial level) to the existence of the "Taqwacore" sub-culture of Western punk music. The duality inherent or apparent in this type of...

      Hi folks, I was recently introduced (at a relatively superficial level) to the existence of the "Taqwacore" sub-culture of Western punk music. The duality inherent or apparent in this type of self-expression is absolutely fascinating to me, and I would love to learn more about it.

      I personally find it a little hard to understand exactly how these musicians reconcile the anti-establishment and maybe progressiveness of punk with many tenets of Islam; the concept of organized religion seems inherently establishment (and dated) to me, and yet these groups somehow embrace both ends of the spectrum. I'm very curious if any Tildesians have opinions on Taqwacore bands or thoughts on the sub-genre as a whole!

      8 votes
    3. Fucked Up - Dose Your Dreams (2018)

      Apple Music BandCamp Spotify Canadian hardcore punk outfit Fucked Up is back with their first new full length since 2014. The group has been known for their art rock output as of late, concept EPs...

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      Canadian hardcore punk outfit Fucked Up is back with their first new full length since 2014. The group has been known for their art rock output as of late, concept EPs they put out years following the Chinese Zodiac. The band is known for disliking each other, sometimes to the point of physical altercations. It is likely a side effect from both the front man and one of the guitarists being songwriters and lyricists, resulting in butting heads. But the result is hard to argue with, Fucked Up has been adored by critics since they came on the scene.

      This album sees one of those two songwriters, lead vocalist Damian Abraham, take a back seat. His vocals don't even appear in ever song on this album. Instead, the whole group does leads at various points throughout the record. It's much more experimental and broad in its genre, employing a lot of pop influences. This results in an album that some how continues the art rock sound they had been cultivating and challenging the listener, while at the same time being very poppy. With a mammoth 18 tracks, the album gives the band plenty of room to explore this new space they find themselves in.

      Like the past couple Fucked Up albums, it's also concept. It has a story and follows a main character in rock opera-like fashion. Their anti-capitalist message comes through in the magical reality of the story of a factory worker that is shown the drudgery of modern life by a sorceress.

      It's ambitious, fun and at the end of day, still very much punk. Super enjoyable, in my opinion. A good introduction to the band if you've never heard them, though you may find their past work a little more one dimensional.

      4 votes