28 votes

What are you typing on?

What are you all typing on?

Right now I'm using a Planck with gateron reds. It was a gift from a friend and I'm loving it. It didn't take too long to get used to the ortholinear layout and I'm starting to like it more than staggered. At first the lack of keys seems like a con, but once you really start digging into the power the firmware offers it's easy to counteract, and it can become easier and faster to use than a full size keyboard

65 comments

  1. [3]
    CALICO
    (edited )
    Link
    I'm very curious to read some of the responses in this thread; I understand that there is a subsection of the computerized population who care very much about the tactile experience that is their...

    I'm very curious to read some of the responses in this thread; I understand that there is a subsection of the computerized population who care very much about the tactile experience that is their keyboards—I've seen it a bit on reddit, I've seen some threads about it on 4chan.org/g/. There seems to be a sub-culture who cares very deeply about this, and especially a preference for mechanical keys.

    I personally type on a Logitech G105. There's no great reasoning behind it, other than it has illuminated keys, didn't break the bank, and I found it at a Walmart. I don't necessarily love it, but I don't dislike it either. Illuminated keys are something that I value very much—I don't think I experience dyslexia or something on that level, but I do sometimes get lost on my keyboard; the easy visibility of the keys make it quick-business to rectify the embarrassingly common mistakes I make when touch-typing fails me for whatever reason.
    The tactile sensation of the keys does leave a bit to be desired. I developed into a computer oriented person on a PC with a mechanical keyboard, although I can't recall the model of that offhand, and that was very pleasing to type on. Even if it was a little too clickety clack at times, it felt better than the bullshit response my keyboard gives me now.

    What I have works well enough, I suppose. But it's not exactly the ideal experience.

    9 votes
    1. [2]
      Ghost1y
      Link Parent
      If you're willing to spend a little more, a Ducky Shine series keyboard might be up your alley. They make nice, solid mechanical keyboards with backlighting. You can select your switches from a...

      If you're willing to spend a little more, a Ducky Shine series keyboard might be up your alley. They make nice, solid mechanical keyboards with backlighting. You can select your switches from a few choices as well.

      1 vote
      1. CALICO
        Link Parent
        The look of them is pretty appealing. I might have to consider getting one in a year or so, when I upgrade my kit a bit.

        The look of them is pretty appealing. I might have to consider getting one in a year or so, when I upgrade my kit a bit.

  2. [2]
    Whom
    Link
    I use an IBM Model M, however it's a mid 90s Lexmark one that will make repairs a bit more of a pain and the board a bit less desirable, though in my opinion not lower quality. It's the best thing...

    I use an IBM Model M, however it's a mid 90s Lexmark one that will make repairs a bit more of a pain and the board a bit less desirable, though in my opinion not lower quality. It's the best thing I've ever typed on, and a nice clean one off of ebay along with an adapter will still cost you less than any modern mechanical keyboard that would even begin to compare.

    It's also worth mentioning that I've got a nice rebind going which uses the Caps Lock key as a replacement for the Super key and both shifts at once acting as a Caps Lock press. I like it a lot, to the point where even if I end up in a sad Model M-less life, I'll probably do the same and find something else to do with the Super key.

    6 votes
    1. Krael
      Link Parent
      Using a Model M here as well, one of the IBM terminal keyboards from 1989. It's just so damn satisfying to type on. The keys are nice and "crunchy", with decent actuation force. Only downside is...

      Using a Model M here as well, one of the IBM terminal keyboards from 1989. It's just so damn satisfying to type on. The keys are nice and "crunchy", with decent actuation force. Only downside is how horrifically loud it is.

      Well, that and how much of a tremendous pain in the ass it was to get working. See, terminal keyboards aren't regular keyboards. This one in particular uses weird key codes that no computer made since the 70s can understand, and has an RJ45 plug. So right off the bat, I needed a $40 adapter with an onboard microcontroller to translate its calls into something a modern system can read.

      Then, since this one is a regular keyboard instead of one of those massive "mech cockpit" keyboards with a billion keys, the controller made some goofy assumptions about it and wrecked the keymapping. For example, ESC was being read as F23, sysrq was being read as "LANG_4", etc. So I had to use a HID utility to figure out what each and every key was being read as, create a configuration for the controller remapping them all to normal keys, and use a shifty CLI windows-only program to upload it to the controller. So yeah, kind of a pain in the ass.

      With all that taken care of, it's a pretty great keyboard. Not bad for a $10 goodwill find. Damn thing is almost pristine, like somebody bought it and realized "oh fuck this is a terminal keyboard? what the hell am I gonna do with that?!" and stuck it in a closet for ~30 years. The keycaps don't even have any shine on them.

      Anyway, the moral of the story is to always check the connectors. I like my keyboard, but I sure as hell wouldn't get another one when standard Model Ms exist.

      1 vote
  3. [3]
    Smittyrb
    Link
    I might get lynched for this, but a 10$ off-brand keyboard from Best Buy. College times are tough; I dream of clickity clack keys one day... Hey, it's a got a 10key though!

    I might get lynched for this, but a 10$ off-brand keyboard from Best Buy. College times are tough; I dream of clickity clack keys one day... Hey, it's a got a 10key though!

    6 votes
    1. musa_totter
      Link Parent
      No one blames you for being unable to afford something better. I hope you can afford one soon, it makes a big difference IMO.

      No one blames you for being unable to afford something better. I hope you can afford one soon, it makes a big difference IMO.

      2 votes
    2. cain
      Link Parent
      I had a 1200 dollar PC with a 10 dollar amazon basics keyboard and mouse for the longest time.

      I had a 1200 dollar PC with a 10 dollar amazon basics keyboard and mouse for the longest time.

      1 vote
  4. [4]
    kfwyre
    Link
    I know mechanical keyboards are all the rage, but you'd have to make a very compelling case to pry me away from my Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000. It is by far the most comfortable keyboard I've...

    I know mechanical keyboards are all the rage, but you'd have to make a very compelling case to pry me away from my Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000. It is by far the most comfortable keyboard I've ever used, especially with the footer on.

    5 votes
    1. PahoojyMan
      Link Parent
      Almost the same situation here. I have a mechanical keyboard with cherry browns which I find super satisfying to type with. I feel like a little kid with a stupid grin on my face going clackity...

      Almost the same situation here. I have a mechanical keyboard with cherry browns which I find super satisfying to type with. I feel like a little kid with a stupid grin on my face going clackity clack.

      But I spend 99% of my time on the Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic with the footer (which makes a world of difference). It's not perfect for gaming, but it's so damn comfortable.

      2 votes
    2. giodamelio
      Link Parent
      I am in the same situation. I bought one years ago at a surplus store and haven't looked back. I think I am on my third or fourth one at this point. At this point I don't think I could ever go...

      I am in the same situation. I bought one years ago at a surplus store and haven't looked back. I think I am on my third or fourth one at this point. At this point I don't think I could ever go back to using a non split keyboard.

      Every time I come across one of these threads, I always want to buy a mechanical keyboard, but I think that just comes down to my love of endless tinkering. When I really think about it I can't think of a reason to actually buy one.

      2 votes
    3. trazac
      Link Parent
      I used to type on your keyboard's big brother, the Microsoft Natural Elite. I preferred it over the 4000 because it had less mushy switches, and overall felt a bit more solid. It was, at least a...

      I used to type on your keyboard's big brother, the Microsoft Natural Elite. I preferred it over the 4000 because it had less mushy switches, and overall felt a bit more solid. It was, at least a the time, much cheaper. I actually bought a handful of them. When their production was ending. I gave a few of them away to friends who wanted them and my father in law stole my last one.

      In the past, I've had a few passing glances at the Sculpt, because I really like the chiclet style and I have some nostalgia for that form factor, but the only thing I really liked about those keyboards was the split and my current keyboard is much better.

      1 vote
  5. murph
    Link
    IBM Model M. Only keyboard I need. It will probably outlive me.

    IBM Model M. Only keyboard I need. It will probably outlive me.

    4 votes
  6. [3]
    calcifer
    Link
    Das Keyboard 4 with MX browns. It's neither the best, nor the cheapest keyboard but I have one at home and one at work and they've never let me down. I also have a shitty $20 vertical mouse that...

    Das Keyboard 4 with MX browns. It's neither the best, nor the cheapest keyboard but I have one at home and one at work and they've never let me down.

    I also have a shitty $20 vertical mouse that completely eliminated my RSI. If you are having wrist pains, I strongly recommend getting one. It'll take a few weeks to get used to, but your nerves will thank you.

    3 votes
    1. ali
      Link Parent
      I will check that mouse out. I have had problems with RSI on and off for a few years now.

      I will check that mouse out. I have had problems with RSI on and off for a few years now.

      2 votes
    2. kfwyre
      Link Parent
      I can second the vertical mouse. I have a different model, but it's wonderfully comfortable. It definitely felt foreign for a while, and, as I picked up competency with it, I expected that I would...

      I can second the vertical mouse. I have a different model, but it's wonderfully comfortable.

      It definitely felt foreign for a while, and, as I picked up competency with it, I expected that I would "unlearn" how to use a flat mouse. Instead of replacing my mousing skill, however, it actually added to it. Now I can use either just fine, even for twitch/precision stuff like gaming.

  7. [3]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. clone1
      Link Parent
      I was on a ducky one for a few years until I got this planck. It's a really solid budget board, a lot nicer than any gaming brand. But the planck's steel back plate as opposed to ducky's aluminum...

      I was on a ducky one for a few years until I got this planck. It's a really solid budget board, a lot nicer than any gaming brand. But the planck's steel back plate as opposed to ducky's aluminum and the metal case definitely make it feel a lot more premium.

      3 votes
    2. Arishaig
      Link Parent
      I have the same board for my desktop and I really like it. I agree that it's a little loud, but so long as you don't have anyone nearby that would be bothered it's more than worth it for that...

      I have the same board for my desktop and I really like it. I agree that it's a little loud, but so long as you don't have anyone nearby that would be bothered it's more than worth it for that satisfying click-clack. The only real complaint I have is that any backlight setting above 3 is just way too bright for me. I kind of wish the LEDs weren't such a bright blue.

      1 vote
  8. json
    Link
    Currently tapping away on the screen of my phone. Otherwise it'll be the built in keyboard to my XPS13 9730. I'd like to get a mechanical keyboard one day when I also get screens and a dock for my...

    Currently tapping away on the screen of my phone.

    Otherwise it'll be the built in keyboard to my XPS13 9730.

    I'd like to get a mechanical keyboard one day when I also get screens and a dock for my laptop and/or be a desktop dude again.

    3 votes
  9. [2]
    hungariantoast
    Link
    I too am typing on a Planck (rev6), but with Kailh BOX Navy switches. I also have a Cooler Master Masterkeys Pro L that was my previous board. It has MX Blue switches. I have another generic...

    I too am typing on a Planck (rev6), but with Kailh BOX Navy switches. I also have a Cooler Master Masterkeys Pro L that was my previous board. It has MX Blue switches.

    I have another generic mechanical keyboard that was $40, but I cannot remember the brand, model, or switch brand, but they are knockoff MX Blue switches.

    So, I have an obvious preference for clicky switches and I have found that, the heavier the switch is, the happier I am. The fact that I can use my Planck at work without annoying co-workers is also a huge plus, but I would probably be happy with some heavy tactile switches like the Kailh BOX Royals if I had to turn down the volume on my keyboard.

    As far as keycaps, I prefer the SA profile that is currently on my Planck. Not only do they feel great, but they make the Navy switches sound much better than any other switch profile I have tried.

    So why would I bother paying $150+ for a 48-key keyboard? Well, the Planck's ortholinear layout and small size ensures that you do not need to move your wrists to complete any combination of key presses. Everything is within reach, 100% of the time. Since every key is within reach and your wrists are not moving at all, the amount of strain that you might experience from typing gets reduced or eliminated.

    On a normal, larger, staggered keyboard, you might have to result to changing the keymap of your keyboard to something like Colemak or Dvorak or in order to potentially reduce RSI, but with the Planck, the keymap of your keyboard (including the default QWERTY) does not matter as much, since every key will still be within reach without moving your wrists.

    Another nifty thing about the Planck is that it uses the QMK firmware that allows me to edit my keymap quickly and introduces an unfathomable amount of customization into my keyboard.

    Plenty of other keyboards also use QMK, so if you are thinking about shopping around for a new board, I highly recommend considering QMK compatibility when deciding on a new keyboard.

    The reason I prefer to use mechanical keyboards in general is because I find that they offer a much more enjoyable and reliable typing experience than "regular" keyboards. I spend most of my day at a desk typing, so why would I not want to spice up that experience and make it a little better, friendlier for myself?

    Some people, like family members, cannot really fathom why I am so particular about something as simple as a keyboard (or a mouse/trackball for that matter) but I think that is because they spend very little time typing.

    I rationalize taking up mechanical keyboards as a hobby in the same way that I rationalize driving a Miata as my main car. Driving is something I simply have to do nearly every day, why should I not use something that I enjoy to accomplish that?

    3 votes
    1. clone1
      Link Parent
      Yeah, I echo your sentiment about spending extra time and money on something you use everyday. I'm very particular about keyboards, my operating system, editors, and pens. You sound like you've...

      Yeah, I echo your sentiment about spending extra time and money on something you use everyday. I'm very particular about keyboards, my operating system, editors, and pens.

      You sound like you've spent a lot of time optimizing your layout. I'm still developing mine. I'd love to see yours for ideas.

      2 votes
  10. Klayy
    Link
    I'm using a Logitech k740. Personally I like the flat keys with the slightly raised bottom row. I am thinking about getting an ergonomic keyboard though, but I don't want to spend too much because...

    I'm using a Logitech k740. Personally I like the flat keys with the slightly raised bottom row. I am thinking about getting an ergonomic keyboard though, but I don't want to spend too much because what if I end up not liking it? All in all I'm not a big keyboard fiend, but I absolutely have to have a vertical mouse.

    2 votes
  11. tomf
    Link
    I'm on a Durgod Taurus K320 TKL with cherry reds. I was using a (so called) Magic Keyboard prior to this with my MBP, but I really wanted some extra keys to map for specific, but minor functions....

    I'm on a Durgod Taurus K320 TKL with cherry reds. I was using a (so called) Magic Keyboard prior to this with my MBP, but I really wanted some extra keys to map for specific, but minor functions. I decided to dip my toes back into the mech world with a cheaper keyboard --- and I couldn't be happier.

    On the caps themselves I doubled up the o-rings to make it even quieter for my zealous bottoming out. Touch typing has taken me some time to get used to, and I'm pretty good, but I tend to hammer the shit out of keys when I have a modifier. No idea why.

    2 votes
  12. [2]
    bme
    Link
    pok3r with mx-browns. I have an ergodox as well that I enjoy.

    pok3r with mx-browns. I have an ergodox as well that I enjoy.

    2 votes
    1. cain
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Same here with a pok3r with browns. I have the backlit version. My first mechanical keyboard and will be the one I use until it dies

      Same here with a pok3r with browns. I have the backlit version. My first mechanical keyboard and will be the one I use until it dies

      2 votes
  13. Parliament
    Link
    The Kinesis Advantage Pro. It changed my life so much that I have two of them.

    The Kinesis Advantage Pro. It changed my life so much that I have two of them.

    2 votes
  14. [2]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. trazac
      Link Parent
      I've always heard that the Ascent Accessory is the only reason to buy a Freestyle. It's a hard pill to swallow considering it costs twice as much as the keyboard itself. I've always wanted to try...

      I've always heard that the Ascent Accessory is the only reason to buy a Freestyle. It's a hard pill to swallow considering it costs twice as much as the keyboard itself. I've always wanted to try it but it's so expensive.

  15. Ghost1y
    Link
    I use a Leopold FC660C keyboard. It's a Topre 65% keyboard (has arrow keys and a few system keys above 60%). It's solid, basic, charcoal gray with black lettering in a nice font so it looks very...

    I use a Leopold FC660C keyboard. It's a Topre 65% keyboard (has arrow keys and a few system keys above 60%). It's solid, basic, charcoal gray with black lettering in a nice font so it looks very sleek, but no-frills too. It's great.

    2 votes
  16. 316nuts
    Link
    CM Storm Quickfire, full w/ cherry blues clack clack!

    CM Storm Quickfire, full w/ cherry blues

    clack clack!

    2 votes
  17. [2]
    JuniperMonkeys
    Link
    I use the thin Apple keyboards, even on my work Dell and gaming PC at home. I'd love all the customization options you get with mechanical keyboards (although I would probably go broke, hah), but...

    I use the thin Apple keyboards, even on my work Dell and gaming PC at home. I'd love all the customization options you get with mechanical keyboards (although I would probably go broke, hah), but when it comes to typing I'm really sensitive to the height of a keyboard, and mechanical keyboards I've tried have all been way too tall. Even the new Cherry low-profile switches seem thicker than my keyboard before one adds the PCB, caps, and case.

    2 votes
    1. Staross
      Link Parent
      Same, mac keyboard on pc (the very flat one). I can't go back to these bulky, tall ones, they are wrist nightmare.

      Same, mac keyboard on pc (the very flat one). I can't go back to these bulky, tall ones, they are wrist nightmare.

      1 vote
  18. stephen
    Link
    Shitty stock wireless dell keyboard that came with my workstation. It has nice mushy keys and these sweet feature where the batteries come loose and send the same letter 12 timessssssssssss. Are...

    Shitty stock wireless dell keyboard that came with my workstation. It has nice mushy keys and these sweet feature where the batteries come loose and send the same letter 12 timessssssssssss.

    Are wire really so bad? Like I would rather have a wire than have to toss out all these batteries.

    2 votes
  19. Weldawadyathink
    Link
    Phone keyboard. But my main one on my PC is a wasd keyboards 80% with cherry clears and Tai Hao pbt sunshine keycaps. I also have cheapo wireless tenkey with ergo clears.

    Phone keyboard. But my main one on my PC is a wasd keyboards 80% with cherry clears and Tai Hao pbt sunshine keycaps. I also have cheapo wireless tenkey with ergo clears.

    2 votes
  20. microfracture
    Link
    IBM Model M. Built on Oct 27, 1986 and still going strong.

    IBM Model M. Built on Oct 27, 1986 and still going strong.

    2 votes
  21. Nitta
    Link
    An inexpensive Chinese tenkeyless keyboard with linear switches. It's okay, not super good. Still my first one after the most primitive keyboards and laptops. The greatest convenience is the lack...

    An inexpensive Chinese tenkeyless keyboard with linear switches. It's okay, not super good. Still my first one after the most primitive keyboards and laptops. The greatest convenience is the lack of numpad: more place for the mouse and better looks.

    I think the ThinkPad "island" (newer type) keyboard was nicer.

    2 votes
  22. [2]
    Cetera
    Link
    On desktop, I use a Logi G610 orion brown, although at the moment I'm typing on a surface pro type cover. While I do love a good mechanical keyboard, for some reason I really love a good laptop...

    On desktop, I use a Logi G610 orion brown, although at the moment I'm typing on a surface pro type cover. While I do love a good mechanical keyboard, for some reason I really love a good laptop keyboard - it's just something about the gentle click of these types of key switches that's really appealing.... Let's call it a guilty pleasure.

    2 votes
    1. trazac
      Link Parent
      I agree on the scissor swtich front. I think they get a bad rap because of how close they are to standard rubber domes, but they are very satisfying to type on and make a keyboard very light. My...

      I agree on the scissor swtich front. I think they get a bad rap because of how close they are to standard rubber domes, but they are very satisfying to type on and make a keyboard very light. My keyboard, the TypeMatrix 2020, uses scissor switches. I switched from a Mech with Blue-style switches to this keyboard and I don't regret it. Still love me a good mech, but my first love is scissor switches.

      1 vote
  23. trazac
    Link
    I probably have one of the more unique keyboards here. It's not sold any more but also wasn't popular, but it's still my favorite keyboard that I've ever owned. The TypeMatrix 2020 (not my...

    I probably have one of the more unique keyboards here. It's not sold any more but also wasn't popular, but it's still my favorite keyboard that I've ever owned. The TypeMatrix 2020 (not my picture, but I have this exact one with the Dvorak switch). I'm kind of sad that I'm a bit late to this party because my comment is going to get buried and this is such a unique and cool keyboard that's relatively unknown.

    It's a matrix, or grid, layout. There is no staggering at all. Keyboards like the Kinesis Advantage and Ergodox have similar layouts, but they still have staggering to account for finger length. TypeMatrix doesn't have any staggering on their keyboards. It doesn't have fancy mechanical switches, and instead opts for scissor switches. These are the types of switches you'd find on a chiclet or laptop keyboard. In this form they are very pleasurable to type on. It keeps the keyboard very thin and light as well. I can very easily carry it around with me if I want to, although I've gotten pretty good at adapting to a normal keyboard.

    The keyboard also has a very healthy split. It's very comfortable for me and I miss it when it's gone. The split is padded with some functional keys, backspace, enter, and tab, and they're very useful in the middle of the keyboard. Shift is extended to two rows and is accessible from the homerow. There is an inlaid number pad, but unlike inlaid numberpads on laptop keyboards, this one is actually useful because of the grid layout. Despite the split, the keyboard is very small.

    It is, of course, a bit of a pain to learn on. Getting rid of the staggered muscle memory is easier on the right hand than on the left. Enter is a hard one to remember, not normally a huge issue since shift doesn't do anything when tapped but very annoying at first. Some other keys are shifted around like the brackets and the | \ key. It'll take at east a week or two to learn fully, and it makes going back to a normal keyboard just as hard. Personally I can type on either now very easily.

    2 votes
  24. [3]
    J-Senior
    Link
    Corsair strafe. My planck should be arriving soon though, I'm in the top 10 on the shipping list.

    Corsair strafe. My planck should be arriving soon though, I'm in the top 10 on the shipping list.

    1 vote
    1. [2]
      clone1
      Link Parent
      Nice. Have you started work on your layout yet?

      Nice. Have you started work on your layout yet?

      1 vote
      1. J-Senior
        Link Parent
        So far I've only used full sized keyboards, so I'm going to flash the default and then make changes as I go

        So far I've only used full sized keyboards, so I'm going to flash the default and then make changes as I go

        1 vote
  25. Greed
    Link
    Coolermaster Masterkeys Pro L RGB with red switches.

    Coolermaster Masterkeys Pro L RGB with red switches.

    1 vote
  26. StellarV
    Link
    I have an EagleTec mechanical keyboard with Outemu Blue switches. It was only $50 for it so it was a really great deal for a mechanical keyboard. I've had it for almost a year with no issues and...

    I have an EagleTec mechanical keyboard with Outemu Blue switches. It was only $50 for it so it was a really great deal for a mechanical keyboard. I've had it for almost a year with no issues and the keys feel great. It's my first mechanical keyboard aside from using the old IBM Model M's.

    1 vote
  27. vakieh
    Link
    Logitech G910. I'd prefer something with Cherry Browns, but I like the large format (most mechanicals I find tend to be tiny little midget keyboards) and I want a tenkey, media buttons, and macro...

    Logitech G910. I'd prefer something with Cherry Browns, but I like the large format (most mechanicals I find tend to be tiny little midget keyboards) and I want a tenkey, media buttons, and macro keys. The fancy lights don't hurt either.

    1 vote
  28. SleepyGary
    Link
    Steelseries 6GV2, a reviewer called it And that's what I love about it. No back lit keys, the layout shuffles the backslash beside the regular slash making it easy for my pinky to hit it, it's got...

    Steelseries 6GV2, a reviewer called it

    A durable, but ultimately boring mechanical gaming keyboard

    And that's what I love about it. No back lit keys, the layout shuffles the backslash beside the regular slash making it easy for my pinky to hit it, it's got some heft so it stays put very well and the design is clean rectangles in a rectangle.

    The mechanical keys are Cherry MX Blacks which don't have the massive clacking sound typically associated with mechanical keyboards and I really like that. Especially in our open office concept shared workspace, as well as at home since my wife is often in the room over and she doesn't need to hear my typing like I'm angrily writing a rant to my Member of Parliament.

    1 vote
  29. quan7hum
    Link
    Old Ducky Zero with custom caps and MX reds. I think I'll be using this until it breaks some day in the far future. My next keyboard will have MX browns or similarly working keys.

    Old Ducky Zero with custom caps and MX reds. I think I'll be using this until it breaks some day in the far future. My next keyboard will have MX browns or similarly working keys.

    1 vote
  30. haykam821
    Link
    A 12-inch MacBook keyboard :(

    A 12-inch MacBook keyboard :(

    1 vote
  31. Marsanghas
    Link
    Leopold FC750R Grey/BLue with Cherry MX Brown. (on my phone I use the WRIO keyboard)

    Leopold FC750R Grey/BLue with Cherry MX Brown.

    (on my phone I use the WRIO keyboard)

    1 vote
  32. aphoenix
    Link
    I'm typing on my MacBook Pro's keyboard. It's not particularly good, but I've been making an effort to embrace it. I also often user a Das Keyboard v3, which is delightful.

    I'm typing on my MacBook Pro's keyboard. It's not particularly good, but I've been making an effort to embrace it.

    I also often user a Das Keyboard v3, which is delightful.

    1 vote
  33. demifiend
    Link
    I'm at working and using a cheap Chicony job, but I have my eye on a Unicomp Ultra Classic buckling spring USB keyboard.

    I'm at working and using a cheap Chicony job, but I have my eye on a Unicomp Ultra Classic buckling spring USB keyboard.

    1 vote
  34. zlsa
    Link
    I'm typing on a MacBook Pro 15" 2017 (yes, the one with the low key travel.) It was one of the things I was hesitant about at first, but in just a few days I came around. I've never liked the key...

    I'm typing on a MacBook Pro 15" 2017 (yes, the one with the low key travel.) It was one of the things I was hesitant about at first, but in just a few days I came around. I've never liked the key travel in mechanical keyboards (I prefer low-travel keys), and the MBP is surprisingly tactile. If I needed a new keyboard for a desktop computer, I'd try to find one as similar as possible to the MBP (as long as it didn't have the dirt/dust intrusion issues.)

    1 vote
  35. dominantp
    Link
    ErgoDox with MX blues. I have 3 in total. I have a Zen keyboard waiting to get built as well. me rikey split mech's

    ErgoDox with MX blues. I have 3 in total. I have a Zen keyboard waiting to get built as well. me rikey split mech's

    1 vote
  36. Fdashstop
    Link
    I used a Corsair K70 Mk 1 with MX Browns for the longest time. It truly was a great experience, but I don't especially care these days.

    I used a Corsair K70 Mk 1 with MX Browns for the longest time. It truly was a great experience, but I don't especially care these days.

    1 vote
  37. bibliophagist
    Link
    I use an ASUS Chromebook. It has a keyboard just like a macbook. Not my favorite (I miss fat keys with curves from my youth) but it has a nice push back and doesn't click too loudly. I like that...

    I use an ASUS Chromebook. It has a keyboard just like a macbook. Not my favorite (I miss fat keys with curves from my youth) but it has a nice push back and doesn't click too loudly. I like that they're a little bit textured (rather than super smooth) and it has all of the essential keys I'd want.

    1 vote
  38. knocklessmonster
    Link
    It's a 2013 Razer Black Widow I bought when I built my gaming computer. I just wanted a cheap mechanical keyboard with media keys. If this one dies, I would definitely buy another, but I don't...

    It's a 2013 Razer Black Widow I bought when I built my gaming computer. I just wanted a cheap mechanical keyboard with media keys. If this one dies, I would definitely buy another, but I don't think that's going to happen. I spilled a liter of water on mine, took it apart and hanged it on a rack for a couple days, and it was good as new, and a freshly clean.

    1 vote
  39. DangerChips
    Link
    Gamdias Hermes Lite, it's my first 'modern' mechanical keyboard and I'm loving it. Wasn't too expensive and has a great tactile feel. The only other mechanical keyboards I've used before this was...

    Gamdias Hermes Lite, it's my first 'modern' mechanical keyboard and I'm loving it. Wasn't too expensive and has a great tactile feel. The only other mechanical keyboards I've used before this was on my Tandy 1000 so.. Not much to compare to.

    1 vote
  40. musa_totter
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    I've got a G710+ with Browns. It's the only mechanical keyboard I bought for myself so far, but I would like to get a slightly smaller 100% with Blues sometime. I've only had a short experience...

    I've got a G710+ with Browns. It's the only mechanical keyboard I bought for myself so far, but I would like to get a slightly smaller 100% with Blues sometime. I've only had a short experience with an MX Blue keyboard, but I liked what I felt.

    1 vote
  41. jwilcoxson
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    My keybord at the office is an Apple USB Aluminum Extended, too bad it’s been discontinued for an insanely priced Bluetooth version.

    My keybord at the office is an Apple USB Aluminum Extended, too bad it’s been discontinued for an insanely priced Bluetooth version.

    1 vote
  42. Abrown
    Link
    Magicforce 68 w/ Gateron Browns -- looking at a low profile split w/ reds for my next board. I have horrible typing habits despite being pretty fast and pretty accurate -- my right hand routinely...

    Magicforce 68 w/ Gateron Browns -- looking at a low profile split w/ reds for my next board. I have horrible typing habits despite being pretty fast and pretty accurate -- my right hand routinely encroaches on the right-most keys that my left normally gets if I'm typing a word that brings my left hand to the edges of the board and I figure I'll eventually make my own split board with extra keys to compensate rather than re-teach myself how to type...

    1 vote
  43. Exalt
    Link
    Ducky One Two with cherry browns. No backlighting, I'm 90% touch typing anyways and the light at the edge of my eye is super annoying. My monitors provide enough to see the keys anyways, even when...

    Ducky One Two with cherry browns. No backlighting, I'm 90% touch typing anyways and the light at the edge of my eye is super annoying. My monitors provide enough to see the keys anyways, even when the room is fully dark.

    I wouldn't say I care a lot about my keyboard. I bought this one after hearing everyone rave about mechanical keyboards and deciding that since I spend all day on the computer I ought to at least give it a try. It is nicer, don't get me wrong, but after all the hype I was a little let down. In the end though, these things are practically indestructible so the cost (~$100) is worth even a small improvement since I use it so much.

    1 vote
  44. Luna
    Link
    Currently I'm using an Apple Magic Keyboard because I'm at work. At home, I have a Das Keyboard Pro 4 with Cherry MX Brown switches. I chose the keyboard because it had media keys and a volume...

    Currently I'm using an Apple Magic Keyboard because I'm at work.

    At home, I have a Das Keyboard Pro 4 with Cherry MX Brown switches. I chose the keyboard because it had media keys and a volume knob, a USB 3.0 hub, and wasn't "gamer"-ified.

    I used to have a Corsair K70 RGB with Cherry MX Reds (it was from before they changed to the Corsair Gaming logo), but keys started not registering and I couldn't fix it by cleaning the keyboard (and it was out of warranty). I kinda miss the RGB, but I always disliked how it never stored the profiles on the device, so I'd have to be signed in to Windows with CUE installed for any non-static configurations.

    Of the switches I've tried (reds, blues, and browns), I like typing on blues the most, but I went for browns because even with o-rings to help reduce the volume, blues are still too loud for my liking. Browns are still pretty good, and o-rings get them to a better volume. Reds just feel mushy. I've tried Topre switches because some coworkers got them, but testing one for 30 seconds isn't enough to be able to make a fair comparison IMO.

    1 vote
  45. frostycakes
    Link
    I have a refurb Razer Ornata that I picked up at Mcro Center for about $25 or so. I wanted something backlit, and with a more satisfying feel than the crappy old HP keyboard I was using before...

    I have a refurb Razer Ornata that I picked up at Mcro Center for about $25 or so. I wanted something backlit, and with a more satisfying feel than the crappy old HP keyboard I was using before this, and it happened to be the cheapest that hit all those buttons. It's no proper mechanical keyboard (but it does have a clicky sound and firmer feel), but it gets the job done.

    1 vote
  46. Naethure
    Link
    I've been using the Microsoft Modern Keyboard for a few months and I love it. I had been looking for a good scissor switch keyboard for a long time, and had settled with the Microsoft Designer...

    I've been using the Microsoft Modern Keyboard for a few months and I love it. I had been looking for a good scissor switch keyboard for a long time, and had settled with the Microsoft Designer Keyboard for a couple of years. I love its keys, but hated the compact layout, so I was pretty happy when they released the Modern one with the same keys but a better layout. The fingerprint scanner is also pretty convenient for logging in to my computer, though that's secondary to the keys and layout.

    1 vote
  47. toly
    Link
    My work keyboard is an Infinity Ergodox with MX Browns that I ended up getting because I started getting RSI pain especially for common but unwieldy shortcuts that I would use. I used a MS Natural...

    My work keyboard is an Infinity Ergodox with MX Browns that I ended up getting because I started getting RSI pain especially for common but unwieldy shortcuts that I would use.

    I used a MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 initially to try to deal with the RSI but the garbage membrane keyboard didn't work for me. I had to click on keys more or less right in the middle so they wouldn't stick, the spacebar required more force after using it for a year or so, and the same shortcuts that cause RSI issues before didn't really get addressed on that keyboard because they were still unwieldy to perform.

    It was either a Kinesis Advantage or the Ergodox and I really wanted something more customizable and smaller than the Advantage so I went with the Ergodox. Been using it everyday for two years and still something I am very happy with to this day.

  48. aldian
    Link
    I'm using a DasKeyboard full size with Cherry MX Browns. It's so tactile and wonderful without being as loud as clicky switches like Cherry Blues. At work I have a Corsair 10 key-less with browns....

    I'm using a DasKeyboard full size with Cherry MX Browns. It's so tactile and wonderful without being as loud as clicky switches like Cherry Blues.

    At work I have a Corsair 10 key-less with browns.

    Worth noting, neither of these keyboards needs software on the machine to control their lighting features, which is really handy for me since they get used in macOS, Windows, and various Linux / BSDs and microcomputers that don't have the software.