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  • Showing only topics with the tag "computer science". Back to normal view
    1. Resources for a comprehensive self-education in Computer Sciences

      What is this? As someone distinctly outside of the field of programming, with no formal education in the Computer Sciences, I am currently in the process of putting myself through a crash...

      What is this?

      As someone distinctly outside of the field of programming, with no formal education in the Computer Sciences, I am currently in the process of putting myself through a crash education. I have found the internet is full of helpful guides in some departments (general language syntax, algorithms), while not nearly as easily accessible in other departments (compiler theory/operation, debugging).

      I recently picked up C# on some tilderino's suggestion (months ago, can't remember who it was, thank you if you see this!), and while the Microsoft Documentation is useful when you have a basic understanding of the topic at hand, I found that buying C# 7.0 in a Nutshell put it all together for me, whereas I was struggling with the official resources.

      Since we have quite the concentration of CS and IT related professionals and enthusiasts here, I guess what I'm looking for here are suggestions on books (physical or otherwise), resources, courses, blogs, or even material from your own CS courses or anything else helpful in putting together the bigger picture beyond learning the syntax and solving problems on Project Euler. Anything helpful beyond another "Hello World!" guide really, especially in the realms of debugging best practices, CLI usage (Windows if possible).

      The general topics I'm thinking of are:

      1. Programming Theory/Paradigms
      2. Algorithms
      3. Debugging & Optimization
      4. Compiler Function/Theory
      5. Architecture
      6. Command-line Interfaces
      7. Unlisted Topics (Such as GitHub/Lab Use)
      18 votes
    2. Is programming science?

      There's no doubt computer science is indeed a science, but what about programming itself? Does it fulfill the basic requirements that make something a science? I'm not an academic, just trying to...

      There's no doubt computer science is indeed a science, but what about programming itself? Does it fulfill the basic requirements that make something a science? I'm not an academic, just trying to start a conversation.

      In many ways, programming is like Math: a means to an end. And Math is a science. Like math, programming has several fields with vastly different ideas of what constitutes programming. Because it is applied logic, programming is also provable and disprovable. There are many disputing hypothesis and, even though absolute truth is a distant dream, it is certain that some sentences are truer than others. Again, like Math, Programming has many practical applications, such as finances and engineering.

      Some people consider Math a propaedeutics: not a science in itself, but a discipline that provides fundamentals to actual sciences such as chemistry and physics. The same reasoning could be applied to programming, as nothing more than a tool for computer science. I personally think there's something unique about programming and it's problem-solving methods that can be considered a field of its own.

      What you guys and girls think?

      6 votes