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  • Showing only topics with the tag "physics". Back to normal view
    1. What is a great book to learn high-school level physics?

      That's a requirement for a test I'm going to take. I tend to learn better with well designed, reasonably comprehensive books that don't treat me like a dumbass (not as a genius either!). Please...

      That's a requirement for a test I'm going to take. I tend to learn better with well designed, reasonably comprehensive books that don't treat me like a dumbass (not as a genius either!).

      Please notice that I'm not asking for websites, interactive platforms, videos, or whatever, but about books, preferably ones that I can study on my Kindle (so PDFs are not ideal). I know all the major websites but I just can't follow them.

      I can pay very small amounts but I'm pretty much unemployed in a third world country so free is always better.

      If there are requirements to understand such books, kindly inform!

      I finished school more than 20 years ago and I was not a good student. But I'm kind of a decent learner now that I have a diagnostics (ADHD).

      Thanks a bunch!

      EDIT: guys, I am actually a beginner in the sense that I literally know little to nothing about the subject! I'm also not a math wizard. Advanced suggestions are appreciated but also entirely useless. This is also for a test, so, beyond a very brief introduction, general understandings on the Neil DeGrasse Tyson level is also of little use for me. I don't need to understand the beauty of the cosmos, I need to pass a test. Thanks!

      10 votes
    2. Science hobbyists of Tildes

      Who here does science at home, for fun? I've been an electronics tinkerer for a while, but I've only recently gotten into reproducing some interesting physics phenomena, like accelerating small...

      Who here does science at home, for fun?

      I've been an electronics tinkerer for a while, but I've only recently gotten into reproducing some interesting physics phenomena, like accelerating small screws with electromagnets and varying the current, voltage, and substances involved to optimize the acceleration. It's fun stuff, but I'm looking to get a vacuum pump and some good vacuum equipment so that I can create a similar experiment on a higher level of energy: "cathode rays", or accelerating electrons produced by thermionic emission. This is like the mechanism powering old televisions and computer monitors, but I hope to set the system up so that it's easy enough to add additional electromagnets to focus or deflect the beam.

      What interesting phenomena have y'all replicated? How did it go? Do you feel that you learned something? Have you published anything on the topic?

      10 votes
    3. Ask a cosmology PhD student (almost) anything!

      Hi all, I am a PhD student focusing in cosmology. I wanted to up the science content here on Tildes, and I thought that one way to do so is to have an informal little Q&A session. As such, feel...

      Hi all,

      I am a PhD student focusing in cosmology. I wanted to up the science content here on Tildes, and I thought that one way to do so is to have an informal little Q&A session. As such, feel free to use this post to ask any questions you might have about cosmology specifically, and physics in general.

      This may not be as exciting as some other science AMAs given that I am a rather early graduate student, so there may be a lot of questions I don't know the answer to. However, I'm willing to try my best and answer over the next few days, and to let you know I don't know if I don't!

      A bit about myself: I did my undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago where I studied physics and mathematics, and then I was a student researcher in a computational cosmology group at a national lab. I subsequently enrolled at UC Davis to continue studying cosmology. Ask me anything about physics, cosmology, or high performance computing!

      I also invite anyone else with expertise to chime in as well!

      23 votes
    4. Entry-level oscilloscope and function generator

      Hi physics tilderinos, I'm about to move into my own apartment and have my own space for the first time in a long time. I'm a software engineer by profession, but I'm an avid electronics hobbyist,...

      Hi physics tilderinos, I'm about to move into my own apartment and have my own space for the first time in a long time. I'm a software engineer by profession, but I'm an avid electronics hobbyist, and I'd love to get my own simple lab set up. I already have the essential handheld gear - soldering iron, multimeter, etc - but I don't have access to an oscilloscope or a decent function generator.

      I do know how to use a scope, though only analog, since my last one in high school was a Beckman Industrial Circuitmate 9020 20MHz analog scope from the 90s. I'm considering the Rigol DS1054Z, since it's recommended by a lot of hobbyists and the software options are all hackable (so you can buy the cheap version and get all the options free). I'd love to know of alternatives and any issues with this scope, or advice on how to find a better one (noting that $400 is really the absolute top of my price range).

      For a function generator, on the other hand, I have absolutely no idea what to buy. I was looking at a couple of DDS generator kits, but a $75 generator kit seems like it would be a biiiit sketch. Any help is appreciated.

      8 votes