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  • Showing only topics with the tag "education". Back to normal view
    1. How did we reach 7 billion people without informing/educating all about how we really live?

      [M/29/small town India, English isn't my first language] I'll admit to being what is called a country bumpkin. The education I received was lacking in many ways, I wasn't taught about the real...

      [M/29/small town India, English isn't my first language]

      I'll admit to being what is called a country bumpkin. The education I received was lacking in many ways, I wasn't taught about the real world, I never really thought about how the food on my plate was grown or how we plunder the living world for resources etc.

      My question is, how did humanity reach 7 billion plus people without even paying a thought about educating the kids properly.

      There is a bitter irony to the fact that we have all been convinced to use the word "growth" to describe what is ultimately a process of depletion and breakdown. tweet

      If we are depleting the earth of all resources, how will coming generations live?

      But if we don't grow, how can we progress?

      Edit: Why can't we have good quality education for everyone and good quality healthcare for everyone on this planet?

      21 votes
    2. What's the education system like in your country?

      Ok I'll start: Brazil: here the schools are split between the fundamental level, which is 1-9th grade, which is then subdivided onto fundamental I and II, which range from 1-5th (ages 6-11) and...

      Ok I'll start:

      Brazil: here the schools are split between the fundamental level, which is 1-9th grade, which is then subdivided onto fundamental I and II, which range from 1-5th (ages 6-11) and 6-9th grades (ages 11-15) respectively. Then we have 'medium' level ("Ensino Médio") which goes from 10th-12th grade, and then we have a national test called ENEM, where everyone takes a test to be able to enroll in the many colleges/universities which accept it, where you then reach 'superior' class and take technical courses and the like.

      Class goes from 7-12:20 Am for fundamental II and 1-5:20 pm for fundamental I. This is because each day is divided into six periods of 50 minutes (+a 20 minute break, like in most places) for the sake of making subject distribution easier.

      There are 8 subjects in fundamental class, Portuguese (grammar), math, geography, history, science, physical education, English (still mostly grammar) and arts. (Unsurprisingly it's more about culture & music than how to draw)
      In 'medium' class, 3 more subjects are added, which are biology, physics and chemistry.

      Funding for education is reserved for the states to decide, although it usually goes from 15-25% of total tax revenue.

      16 votes
    3. What evidence-based learning strategies do you employ?

      I am soon starting a PhD program. I think lately the best investment of my time towards becoming a researcher is learning how to teach myself to become a better learner. There are a lot of various...

      I am soon starting a PhD program. I think lately the best investment of my time towards becoming a researcher is learning how to teach myself to become a better learner. There are a lot of various strategies I have come across, but I haven't found much that has the support of research. One example I have found is spaced-repetition via the software AnkiDroid (when were med students planning on sharing this with the rest of us?).

      What other techniques and strategies are out there? And if they work for you, where in research literature is the technique supported?

      12 votes
    4. Can you access university libraries in your country w/o an affiliation to the university?

      In Turkey, where I live, almost all universities restrict access to staff and students (only their own students if not a graduate student); the only exception I can find is the Koç University...

      In Turkey, where I live, almost all universities restrict access to staff and students (only their own students if not a graduate student); the only exception I can find is the Koç University where paid membership is open to public. I've researched in the past and found that major universities around the world---i.e. Italy, France, UK, US; selection factor being the languages I can read---seem to allow the public to access in one way or another (article, in Turkish, with results). But I wonder how accurate my reading is with the reality, and thus I'm asking this question.

      So, as a plain citizen w/o any current affiliation to any educational institutions, can you access university libraries where you live? Does it matter if you have certain diplomas or affiliations? How easy it is?

      10 votes
    5. What was your educational experience like?

      What did you like about school? What did you dislike about it? What were the most important things that you learned? What would you change about education if you had the power? If you could go...

      What did you like about school?
      What did you dislike about it?
      What were the most important things that you learned?
      What would you change about education if you had the power?
      If you could go back and re-do things knowing what you know now, what would you do differently?

      I'm not necessarily looking for individual answers to each question, I'm just putting those out there to frame the kind of thoughts I'm looking for. I'm really just interested in hearing other people's stories! I'm a teacher and frequently do a lot of talking about education from my own perspective, but I don't feel like I do enough listening to others' views.

      Also, to avoid gumming up the questions with multiple tenses, I wrote everything in past tense. That doesn't mean I'm only interested in the responses of people who are done with their formal education though. I'd love to hear from people who are still in school as well!

      18 votes
    6. Studying social sciences.

      I have business degree and planning to get masters in political science or sociology. I only had electives related to these fields and I enjoyed it greatly. I know people don't like these programs...

      I have business degree and planning to get masters in political science or sociology. I only had electives related to these fields and I enjoyed it greatly. I know people don't like these programs because of low employment opportunities. So is it good idea to purse them despite low prospects of employment? I know enjoy learning about these subjects a lot. What was your experience like? How are your employment situation? What was your favorite part?

      6 votes
    7. Anyone have or pursuing a PhD?

      Hello Tildes, I recently was accepted to my first PhD program, to one of my top choices. I am really quite excited about it. So I wanted to ask you... If you have a PhD: Are you glad you spent all...

      Hello Tildes,

      I recently was accepted to my first PhD program, to one of my top choices. I am really quite excited about it.

      So I wanted to ask you...

      If you have a PhD:

      • Are you glad you spent all that time pursuing it?
      • What does having one allow you to do that not having one would prevent you from doing?
      • Do you still maintain connections with your advisor(s) and/or fellow students?
      • Are you proud of your research?
      • Do you still look at research in that field?
      • What do you do now?

      If you pursuing a PhD, or have one and can answer these questions as your past self:

      • Do you get along with your advisor?
      • How much time do you spend looking at publications in your field?
      • Is most of your new knowledge from these publications, or do you perhaps rely on books you have not yet read?
      • How has your own funding (e.g. NSF fellowship) or lack thereof impacted what you do with your day?
      • What do you anticipate doing after you finish?
      • What (open source?) tools do you find the most useful in your work?
      • How do you balance work/life?
      • If you are/were a TA, how did you learn how to be an effective one?
      • How do you make sure you are on track with your research goals?
      • What are your biggest wins? Your biggest regrets?
      • any other things you want to talk about?

      Cheers!

      20 votes
    8. What are some common skills that will become extinct in the next couple of decades?

      Today I got into a conversation with my coworkers about how cursive is all but dead with our students. We adults all grew up learning it and were often forced to use it even when we didn't want...

      Today I got into a conversation with my coworkers about how cursive is all but dead with our students. We adults all grew up learning it and were often forced to use it even when we didn't want to, but it has been out of vogue in American schools for a while now, so most of our students legitimately don't know how to read or write it. Opinions as to whether or not this was a bad thing were split. Some people considered the skill unnecessary and were happy to see it go the way of the dinosaur. Life moves on, they said--and the skill was inessential anyway because students could simply print instead. Some even took things a step further and argued that print was also going to become outdated with the prevalence of computers and phones. Nevertheless, others argued that cursive was important and valuable for kids to learn, particularly if they wanted to be able to sign their names or read documents written in script (e.g. old letters from family members, historical documents, etc.)

      The discussion then continued to analog clocks. Being able to read them is still technically in the curriculum standards for many states, but it's the kind of thing that often gets briefly touched on and then discarded. Because digital clocks are so prevalent now, many students never practice reading analog clocks outside of those specific lessons, and thus they never truly master it. While more of our students can read analog clocks than can write in cursive, it too seems to be headed down the path to extinction. Opinions about whether this was bad were much stronger, with nearly everyone agreeing that it's a worthwhile skill rather than something inessential.

      The conversation made me curious to hear what everyone here thinks--not just about these but about dying skills in general. What are some skills that you believe will fall out of widespread use in the coming years? Is their departure a good/bad thing?

      27 votes
    9. What should the government's role in education be? How much schooling should be compulsory? How much of it should be paid for by the student or their parents?

      This started as a sub-thread in a topic about possible contenders for the 2020 US Presidential race, but it generated enough interesting discussion that I thought it'd be worth spinning off into...

      This started as a sub-thread in a topic about possible contenders for the 2020 US Presidential race, but it generated enough interesting discussion that I thought it'd be worth spinning off into its own topic, particularly so we can include people outside the US who are ignoring or filtering out topics about American politics.

      To expand on the questions in the topic title:

      • What level of education should be required by law of every citizen?
      • How should schools be funded? What role should taxes play vs. tuition paid by the student or their parents?
      • Should homeschooling be allowed, and if so, how strict should the educational requirements be?

      And if you want to go really deep:

      • What is the purpose of education in the first place? Is it to make better and more productive workers; to create an informed electorate; to learn for the sake of learning?
      16 votes
    10. Who was the most influential teacher in your life? And how did they influence you?

      We're finishing up the graduation season which has me thinking about some of the impactful teachers in my life. Who's someone that made a big impact on you? What lessons did they teach you or...

      We're finishing up the graduation season which has me thinking about some of the impactful teachers in my life. Who's someone that made a big impact on you? What lessons did they teach you or passions did they instill?

      7 votes
    11. Should how to use computers effectively be taught in mainstream education?

      Since computers and computer-like devices are prevalent in most modern societies shouldn't we be teaching people how to use them effectively and for purpose, rather than saying "oh, they'll pick...

      Since computers and computer-like devices are prevalent in most modern societies shouldn't we be teaching people how to use them effectively and for purpose, rather than saying "oh, they'll pick it up" or "they grew up with it, they'll understand it just fine". Both of which, are clearly not the case.

      What does tildes think of a mandatory computing class in early grades, and/or several years of classes to master the concepts, like the U.S. does with History, English literature, Math, and Sciences?

      Should computers be necessary to learn as an academic subject?

      Or is it fine that many people can't do very simple tasks on computers?
      Is it fine that they do not understand basic computing concepts? e.g. keyboard shortcuts, searching, folder management

      32 votes