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  • Showing only topics with the tag "education". Back to normal view
    1. Optimizing for test scores

      I hate how much time school takes from me. The semester for me is just a period of un-productivity, of completing assignments that don't teach me anything, of studying materials for a test I'll do...

      I hate how much time school takes from me. The semester for me is just a period of un-productivity, of completing assignments that don't teach me anything, of studying materials for a test I'll do bad on, about knowledge I'll forget as soon as there are no more tests on it. School stresses me out, makes me anxious, destroys my ability to think and get into a flow and be active. School makes me lazy, it makes me tired, it makes me hate the world.

      I want to learn. I want to sit down at my desk and get into a flow and experiment and learn new things and become better as a result. Instead I'm optimizing for test scores.

      I'm not building things. I'm not even really studying. I'm a professional student, going for the points, and paying tens of thousands of dollars for the privilege.

      I hate tests. They are fundamentally flawed for the objective of teaching. Two of my classes are entirely test-based, and they're the classes from which I have learned nothing. My other two classes have included programming projects and essays as part of our grade. That's the knowledge I will retain, that is the information I have actually learned. But even still, those projects and essays in those classes count for a tiny percentage of their overall class grades. The majority of the grades still come from tests. From judging students based on their ability to memorize information, not to understand or practice or apply the knowledge of the class.

      Why? Why do we insist on testing students, on passing or failing them, on determining their future and institutional worth, on their ability to memorize information? Why do we give them these stressful impending tests with stressful impending due dates that cover a stressful, bloated number of topics? This is not learning. This is not education. This is gamified class-passing. Why do we structure things this way? Is it so administrations can quantify education and try to demonstrate progress? I don't get it. I fucking hate it.

      At the end of every semester. Every goddamn fucking semester, I'm exhausted, burnt out, and just so done with anything and everything that requires me to think. I end up having this stupid recovery period of about a month where I just laze about, playing video games and reflexively rejecting anything that requires thought. School inflicts upon me, mentally, the equivalent of breaking a bone.

      I fucking hate this. I want to make things and be creative and active especially during the precious months when I am not taking classes. I hate that school spoils this for me.

      9 votes
    2. If you had to teach a class about information literacy, what would your key points be?

      I'm in an online course right now that touches upon information literacy: the ability to access, sort through, and analyze information (particularly online). It is not a very in-depth course, and...

      I'm in an online course right now that touches upon information literacy: the ability to access, sort through, and analyze information (particularly online). It is not a very in-depth course, and a lot of the recommendations it gives feel a little limited/dated, or just out of touch with current internet practices (e.g. trust .edu and .gov sites -- don't trust .com sites; use Britannica Online instead of Wikipedia). It also doesn't really account for things like memes, social media, or really much of the modern internet landscape.

      I know we have a lot of very technically literate as well as informationally literate people here, and I'm curious: if you were tasked with creating a class to help people learn information literacy, including how to identify misinformation online, what would some of your key points or focuses be? How would you convey those to your students (whether those students are kids, adults, or both)?

      17 votes