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  • Showing only topics with the tag "self promotion". Back to normal view
    1. Hi there, I've started a new public server on Discord for music discussion, recommendations, etc. I've seen a number of these go down in flames or completely lose the appeal for their core...

      Hi there, I've started a new public server on Discord for music discussion, recommendations, etc. I've seen a number of these go down in flames or completely lose the appeal for their core audience, so I've borrowed some principles from Tildes, adapted for the somewhat different but related issues this kind of Discord server typically runs into. I thought this may be of interest to some users here, so you're all welcome as long as you play by our rules!

      If you'd like to see our rules and goals first, check the paste here. They'll be pretty familiar to anyone here, though they are subject to change depending on our needs. This should go without saying, but to be clear, this server is not officially connected to Tildes, nor is it exclusive to Tildes users. There just might be some overlap in ideas :)

      Here's our permanent invite link if you'd like to join: https://discord.gg/kC4sSQq

      14 votes
    2. I am working on an app called Percent Done that is a combination of goal setting, time tracking and habit tracking. I like setting time-based goals for myself every day, such as “write for an...

      I am working on an app called Percent Done that is a combination of goal setting, time tracking and habit tracking.

      I like setting time-based goals for myself every day, such as “write for an hour” or “work on Percent Done for four hours.”

      I also like Seinfeld’s “don’t break the chain” method. For example, Apple Watch shows you how many days you have completed your exercise circle and tells you that you have been keeping at it for x days.

      Percent Done is a marriage of these two concepts. It allows you to set goals and track the time you spend on them, as well as how many days in a row you have consistently completed them. For example, you can add a goal that says “write for an hour every day,” and Percent Done will notify you every day to write for an hour. You will be able to tap on this goal and Percent Done will start counting back from one hour. You will also be able to see how many days in a row you have written for an hour.

      Here is a demo GIF.

      You can also add one-time goals to Percent Done with or without time tracking, so it is a task management tool as well.

      You can play with the design prototype here: Percent Done design prototype

      I would really love to get your feedback on this. If you are interested in being a beta tester, feel free to reply to this topic or e-mail me at "hi at evrim dot io."

      By the way, this is almost completely a self-promotion post. If it is against the rules, I'd be happy to remove this.

      24 votes
    3. Update! After a few hours of struggling I managed to set up Read the docs for Tildee, it should help using the library significantly. After getting some inspiration from TAPS I thought that maybe...

      Update! After a few hours of struggling I managed to set up Read the docs for Tildee, it should help using the library significantly.

      After getting some inspiration from TAPS I thought that maybe I try to work on something vaguely similar on my own. And after… some? hours of coding today I came up with this: tildee.py (source)
      It's a wrapper for the Tildes Public/Web API that is already used by the site internally to make it work. The obvious problem with that is that it will at one point break when this unstable API is changed. It can do basically all things a normal user can do with the notable exception of applying comment labels (because I haven't gotten around to that yet).

      Example of usage for a DM reply bot (result):

      import sys
      from tildee import TildesClient
      import time
      
      # Initialize client and log in, 2FA isn't supported yet and will probably break in horrible ways
      t = TildesClient("username", "password", base_url="https://localhost:4443", verify_ssl=False)
      
      while True:
          # Retrieve the "unread messages" page and get a list of the conversations there
          unread_message_ids = t.fetch_unread_message_ids()
          for mid in unread_message_ids:
              # Access the conversation history page; this also clears the "unread" flag 
              conversation = t.fetch_conversation(mid)
              # Get the text of the last message
              text = conversation.entries[-1].content_html
              # Abort if it's from the current user (I don't think this could actually happen)
              if conversation.entries[-1].author == t.username:
                  break
              print(f"Found a message by {conversation.entries[-1].author}")
              # If the message contains a reference, reply in kind
              if "hello there" in text.lower():
                  print("Replying…")
                  t.create_message(mid, f"General {conversation.entries[-1].author}! You are a bold one.")
              # Delay before processing next unread message
              time.sleep(3)
          # Delay before next unread check
          time.sleep(60)
      

      This has a lot of potential. Haven't yet figured out potential for what, but I'll take what I can get.
      I'd be really grateful if someone with a little more experience than me (that's not exactly a high bar :P) could give me some pointers on the project's structure and the "API design", hence the ask tag. Other creative ideas for what to use this for are appreciated, too.

      48 votes
    4. Genetic Algorithms

      Introduction to Genetic Algorithms Genetic algorithms can be used to solve problems that are difficult, or impossible to solve with traditional algorithms. Much like neural networks, they provide...

      Introduction to Genetic Algorithms

      Genetic algorithms can be used to solve problems that are difficult, or impossible to solve with traditional algorithms. Much like neural networks, they provide good-enough solution in short amount of time, but rarely find the best one. While they're not as popular as neural networks nor as widely used, they still have their place, as we can use them to solve complicated problems very fast, without expensive training rigs and with no knowledge of math.

      Genetic algorithms can be used for variety of tasks, for example for determining the best radio antenna shape, aerodynamic shapes of cars and planes, wind mill shapes, or various queing problems. We'll use it to print "Hello, World!".

      How does it work?

      Genetic algorithm works in three steps.

      1. Generate random solutions
      2. Test how good they are
      3. Pick the best ones, breed and mutate them, go to step 2

      It works just like evolution in nature. First, we generate randomised solutions to our problem (in this case: random strings of letters).

      Then, we test each solution and give it points, where better solutions gain more points. In our problem, we would give one point for each correct letter in the string.

      Afterwards, we pick the best solutions and breed it together (just combine the strings). It's not bad idea to mutate (or randomize) the string a bit.

      We collect the offsprings, and repeat the process until we find good enough solution.

      Generate random solutions

      First of all, we need to decide in which form we will encode our solutions. In this case, it will be simply string. If we wanted to build race cars, we would encode each solution (each car) as array of numbers, where first number would be size of the first wheel, the second number would be size of the second wheel, etc. If we wanted to build animals that try to find food, fight and survive, we would choose a decision tree (something like this).

      So let's start and make few solutions, or entities. One hundred should be enough.

      from random import randint
      
      goal = "Hello, World!"
      allowed_characters = list("qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmQWERTYUIOPASDFGHJKLZXCVBNM ,!")
      
      def get_random_entity(n, string_length):
          entities = []
          for _ in range(0, n):
              entity = ""
              for _ in range(0, string_length):
                  entity += allowed_characters[randint(0, len(allowed_characters)-1)]
              entities.append(entity)
          return entities
      
      print(get_random_entity(100, 13))
      

      Test how good they are

      This is called a "fitness function". Fitness function determines how good a solution is, be it a car (travel distance), animal (food gathered), or a string (number of correct letters).

      The most simple function we can use right now will simply count correct letters. If we wanted, we could make something like Levenshtein distance instead.

      def get_fitness(entity):
          points = 0
          for i in range(0, len(entity)):
              if goal[i] == entity[i]:
                  points += 1
          return points
      

      Crossover and mutation

      Now it's time to select the best ones and throw away the less fortunate entities. Let's order entities by their fitness.

      Crossover is a process, when we take two entities (strings) and breed them to create new one. For example, we could just give the offspring one part from one parent and another part from second parent.

      There are many ways how to do this, and I encourage you to try multiple approaches when you will be doing something like this.

      P:  AAAABBB|BCCCC
      P:  DDDDEEE|FGGGG
      
      F1: AAAABBB|FGGGG
      

      Or we can just choose at random which letter will go from which parent, which works the best here. After we have the offsprint (F1), we should mutate it. What if we were unfortunate, and H (which we need for our Hello, World!) was not in any of the 100 entities? So we take the string and for each character of the string, there is a small chance to mutate it - change it at random.

      F1:  ADDDEBEFGCGG
      F1`: ADHDEBEFGCGG
      

      And it's done. Now kill certain part of old population. I don't know which percentage is best, but I usually kill about 90% of old population. The 90% that we killed will be replaced by new offsprings.

      There is just one more thing: which entities do we select for crossover? It isn't bad idea - and it generally works just fine - to just give better entities higher chance to breed.

      def get_offspring(first_parent, second_parent, mutation_chance):
          new_entity = ""
          for i in range(0, len(first_parent)):
              if randint(0, 100) < mutation_chance:
                  new_entity += allowed_characters[randint(0, len(allowed_characters)-1)]
              else:
                  if randint(0, 1) == 0:
                      new_entity += first_parent[i]
                  else:
                      new_entity += second_parent[i]
          return new_entity
      

      When we add everything together, we get this output:

      Generation 1, best score: 2 ::: QxZPjoptHfNgX
      Generation 2, best score: 3 ::: XeNlTOQuAZjuZ
      Generation 3, best score: 4 ::: weolTSQuoZjuK
      Generation 4, best score: 5 ::: weTgnC uobNdJ
      Generation 5, best score: 6 ::: weTvny uobldb
      Generation 6, best score: 6 ::: HellSy mYbZdC
      Generation 7, best score: 7 ::: selOoXBWoAKn!
      Generation 8, best score: 8 ::: HeTloSoWYZlh!
      Generation 9, best score: 8 ::: sellpX WobKd!
      Generation 10, best score: 9 ::: welloq WobSdb
      Generation 11, best score: 9 ::: selloc WoZjd!
      Generation 12, best score: 10 ::: wellxX WoVld!
      Generation 13, best score: 10 ::: welltX World!
      Generation 14, best score: 10 ::: welltX World!
      Generation 15, best score: 10 ::: welltX World!
      Generation 16, best score: 11 ::: zellov Wobld!
      Generation 17, best score: 11 ::: Hellty World!
      Generation 18, best score: 11 ::: welloX World!
      Generation 19, best score: 11 ::: welloX World!
      Generation 20, best score: 11 ::: welloX World!
      Generation 21, best score: 12 ::: welloX World!
      Generation 22, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 23, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 24, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 25, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 26, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 27, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 28, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 29, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 30, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 31, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 32, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 33, best score: 12 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 34, best score: 13 ::: Helloy World!
      Generation 35, best score: 13 ::: Hello, World!
      

      As we can see, we find pretty good solution very fast, but it takes very long to find perfect solution. The complete code is here.

      Maintaining diversity

      When we solve difficult problems, it starts to be increasingly important to maintain diversity. When all your entities are basically the same (which happened in this example), it's difficult to find other solutions than those that are almost the same as the currently best one. There might be a much better solution, but we didn't find it, because all solutions that are different to currently best one are discarded. Solving this is the real challenge of genetic algorithms. One of the ideas is to boost diverse solutions in fitness function. So for every solution, we compute distance to the current best solutions and add bonus points for distance from it.

      19 votes
    5. What is our policy about posting original contents (e.g. me submitting a blog post I wrote, which I just did a few minutes ago)? IMO, if it is a personal blog, it should be okay, and not really...

      What is our policy about posting original contents (e.g. me submitting a blog post I wrote, which I just did a few minutes ago)?

      IMO, if it is a personal blog, it should be okay, and not really different from submitting a text topic here. Especially if the blog is not tracking you.

      15 votes
    6. This is going to sound like a total rant, but I just don't know what to do anymore. I've been completely screwed by OnePlus and they really just don't care. I bought a OnePlus 6T back at the end...

      This is going to sound like a total rant, but I just don't know what to do anymore. I've been completely screwed by OnePlus and they really just don't care. I bought a OnePlus 6T back at the end of November and received it in early December. It has barely worked for about two weeks since then. The ticket I have open with them is ridiculously long. And then they just went dead silent on me. I assumed I was being ignored. I even got the perma-hold ignore on the phone too. But today OnePlus finally replied after 27 days!! During all this time I just went out and bought a Pixel 3XL and I am tickled pink with it.

      If anyone wants a good laugh at my expense you are welcome to read my story on my site read my story on my site.

      From the bottom of my heart - be careful spending your money with OnePlus.

      *edit - formatting

      5 votes
    7. I'm sure occasional self promoted content is actually fine (asking for feedback on music, games, etc), but I've been a part of several subreddits that had to implement rules where you had to split...

      I'm sure occasional self promoted content is actually fine (asking for feedback on music, games, etc), but I've been a part of several subreddits that had to implement rules where you had to split 50/50 linking to your own content and participating in the community (non link comments). This was to curb people from ONLY posting links to their own youtube videos and nothing else. Content itself was fine, usually, but as you can probably tell, smaller subreddits didn't like being treated as ad spaces for youtubers that didn't contribute anything else. It's not a big deal for larger communities, but a real one for niche ones.

      How does tildes expect to deal with this? Is it even an issue? Was this discussed (couldn't find any threads by skimming)?

      13 votes
    8. I've read the docs and I personally have not seen this topic come up yet. I've been weary/afraid to post any more of my own content since my very first post here on ~Tildes. Are there currently...

      I've read the docs and I personally have not seen this topic come up yet.

      I've been weary/afraid to post any more of my own content since my very first post here on ~Tildes. Are there currently any unofficial rules for self-promotion? We all know Reddit once had that stupid 10:1 (or was it 5:1?) ratio rule before they chucked it. I don't want to feel like a selfish person or a spammy person if I submit content that I created and/or links to accounts that promote myself as a brand.

      12 votes