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  • Showing only topics with the tag "development". Back to normal view
    1. My title sucks, couldn't word it better. So, I hate having to use the tilde char. Doing tildes.net~tildes is much harder for me than tildes.net/t/tildes. It would be cool if tildes also supported...

      My title sucks, couldn't word it better.

      So, I hate having to use the tilde char. Doing tildes.net~tildes is much harder for me than tildes.net/t/tildes. It would be cool if tildes also supported using "/t/". I am not suggesting to remove the "~", but make one redirect to the other.

      22 votes
    2. Tildes Docker Image

      Looking at the development setup page, the suggested setup is to use vagrant to create and provision a VM. Out of curiosity, is there a reason for this preference over setting up a Tildes Docker...

      Looking at the development setup page, the suggested setup is to use vagrant to create and provision a VM. Out of curiosity, is there a reason for this preference over setting up a Tildes Docker image inside the repo? Tildes seems like a pretty simple and straightforward web app, it shouldn't be difficult to create. Is it just a developer preference of Deimos/Tildes devs? Or is there a logistical reason?

      9 votes
    3. Pretty straight forward question, but basically I was watching a discussion panel the other day talking about the ethics of Self-Driving cars. A topic came up about people writing crappy code, and...

      Pretty straight forward question, but basically I was watching a discussion panel the other day talking about the ethics of Self-Driving cars. A topic came up about people writing crappy code, and more than that, people not testing their code. And if they do, they do point testing. I am in my last semester of uni and I am working with some companies where we are doing pretty extensive testing, happy flows and a lot of alternate flows, as well as UI/UX testing. I wanted to extend this question to you, do you guys do testing, what type? How much do you focus on it? And if u love it/hate it?

      13 votes
    4. I'm fairly new to Tildes and have become so impressed that I want to learn Python in order to contribute to its success. I have approximately 15 years of experience with classic ASP/ASP.NET and...

      I'm fairly new to Tildes and have become so impressed that I want to learn Python in order to contribute to its success. I have approximately 15 years of experience with classic ASP/ASP.NET and haven't coded since 2008.

      I've been pointed to VSCodium for an editor.

      I'm using OSX and wondered how I would set up an executable environment for testing/development.

      Other than that, is there anything else you'd recommend for me to get started?

      17 votes
    5. Tildes mobile app

      I wasn’t able to find a discussion on this, though I’m sure there has been, and for that, I apologize. Is there any kind of timeframe on the release of a mobile app for tildes? I would guess that...

      I wasn’t able to find a discussion on this, though I’m sure there has been, and for that, I apologize.

      Is there any kind of timeframe on the release of a mobile app for tildes?

      I would guess that on Reddit most of their traffic comes from people accessing the site on their phones at this point, but I could be wrong. In any case, it certainly is a large portion of the users that access the site in this way.

      With that in mind, it would be nice to be able to access tildes from a mobile app to do away with the clunkiness that comes with using the site through a mobile browser. I don’t mean to sound like it’s terrible. The site functions well enough through a mobile browser, but it would certainly have me using tildes a lot more if the convenience of a mobile app was available.

      I’m sure the developers are very busy, and I don’t want to sound demanding, I’m just curious.

      And once again, I apologize if this has been discussed recently.

      21 votes
    6. A couple of years ago I had the itch for a 3D platformer and didn't feel like replaying Super Mario 64 for the nth time. I saw that there was a game called Poi and it was clearly inspired by SM64....

      A couple of years ago I had the itch for a 3D platformer and didn't feel like replaying Super Mario 64 for the nth time. I saw that there was a game called Poi and it was clearly inspired by SM64. I picked it up and played it while it was in early access.

      I enjoyed my time with it, but because the game wasn't content and feature complete, I ended up making my way through an unfinished, buggy version. This is not a complaint, as I knew well that it was still in development, but I can't deny that it hampered my enjoyment of the final product. When I finally sat down to play through the game for the "first" time after its release, my previous experience soured my current one because I was retreading familiar, albeit improved, levels.

      Distance, another early access game I purchased, released in full this past month. Unlike with Poi, I actually stopped myself from playing Distance in early access (after trying it out briefly), so that I wouldn't ruin the game for myself. As such, my enjoyment of it has been far greater. Those two games, plus a handful of others, have made it such that I pretty much will no longer buy a game if it's in early access, simply because I'd rather wait for the full thing.

      With that in mind, I'm curious if other people do the same thing, or if some people actually like the behind the scenes experience of playing a game as it gets built? Also, what are some early access success stories that have had solid, full releases? What are some that would be considered successes in spite of the fact that they haven't fully released yet?

      12 votes
    7. Hello everyone, I have updated my personal website which I am planning to make a portfolio and maybe a blog. I am looking for feedback if anyone can give me pointers on the style. I don't know...

      Hello everyone,

      I have updated my personal website which I am planning to make a portfolio and maybe a blog. I am looking for feedback if anyone can give me pointers on the style. I don't know what tildes stance on 'self promotion' is though.
      I don't make any money from my website, I kind of want to use it as a business card. I do have Google analytics on it, but I am thinking of removing it- maybe someone can chime in to pros and cons of it.

      I have tried to make my website as fast as possible and keep the design minimal.
      Maybe we can use this post for others to receive feedback on their projects, as well? I'll post my website as a comment then to keep the posts organized.

      13 votes
    8. I thought about posting this as a comment in the other active pronoun conversation but I didn't want to derail it with a tangent. For starters I should make it clear I believe honoring someone's...

      I thought about posting this as a comment in the other active pronoun conversation but I didn't want to derail it with a tangent. For starters I should make it clear I believe honoring someone's pronoun preferences is a matter of basic decency and respect. Conversely, insisting on using a different word when you know someone doesn't like it is, frankly, a jerk move. It's being antagonistic for no good reason.

      That said, an acquaintance recently informed me that her 4-year-old prefers to use the pronoun "they." I have to admit something about this situation doesn't sit right with me. I'm also the parent of a 4-year-old, and it's clear to me that kids that age aren't developmentally equipped to make an informed decision about gender identity.

      I can't help but feel like the parents are putting words in their kid's mouth, projecting a non-binary assumption onto a minor who lacks the cognitive and emotional maturity to manage it in any meaningful way. Saddling a preschooler with that kind of baggage just strikes me as irresponsible parenting.

      I'm not saying there should be some kind of hard-line age of consent, just that four is too young. One ought to be far enough along developmentally to come to one's own conclusions about pronouns and gender presentation.

      Apologies if I'm strawmanning, but I guess the argument could be made that all kids should be referred to as "they" — by default — until they reach an appropriate age to choose their own gender identities. I can sympathize with that as a goal, but it strikes me as unrealistic. I don't think society would ever be able to attain that kind of widespread change.

      I'm curious what my fellow tilders think about this subject. (FWIW, I am referring to this kid as "they" and keeping my objections to myself, apart from this discussion.)

      11 votes
    9. Hi everyone, I'm a frontend developer and do a bit of backend work as well. I'd really like to contribute some of my downtime to helping build this site. I've checked out the issue tracker on...

      Hi everyone, I'm a frontend developer and do a bit of backend work as well. I'd really like to contribute some of my downtime to helping build this site. I've checked out the issue tracker on gitlab and some of the docs, tech goals and announcement, but I'd like to start getting my hands dirty and contribute some code.

      • Is there a roadmap for development?
      • A feature list to implement?
      • Bugs to fix?

      How can I help out? What's the best way to get started?

      Also for all non-devs, what is the best way that they can start helping out?

      30 votes
    10. I was playing WoW last night and realized that the Guild Charter system is the perfect way to get around this issue. For those unfamiliar, a guild is a group of players that can complete...

      I was playing WoW last night and realized that the Guild Charter system is the perfect way to get around this issue. For those unfamiliar, a guild is a group of players that can complete activities that are impossible solo. To create a guild, you need to have 5 signatures - that is, other players agreeing to join the guild and help it grow. The issue with Reddit is that you have new communities pop up, flourish for a few weeks, and die. The number of "signatures" required can be changed to whatever fits, as 5 is too low for an online community, but it accomplishes several things, such as making sure it is relevant, making sure it stays active, and giving users a stake in growth. You could even tie this into the trust system as well, with higher trust users being able to use less "signatures" to create a group. I'm sure @Deimos can refine it.

      16 votes