• Activity
  • Votes
  • Comments
  • New
  • All activity
  • Showing only topics with the tag "movies". Back to normal view
    1. Is there a book that you'd like to see made into a movie or series?

      This is a general, "what books have themes or content that would make for great movies" question. Graphic novels are included here. Could have posted in ~talk or ~movies, but I'm seeking the...

      This is a general, "what books have themes or content that would make for great movies" question. Graphic novels are included here.

      Could have posted in ~talk or ~movies, but I'm seeking the opinions of dedicated readers, who've had the thought in considering a story, "I'd really like to see the visuals for this", or "a movie/series adaptation could expand on these themes".

      Also, what were your biggest disappointments in the rendering of a book into a movie/TV series?

      My picks:
      Ursula Le Guin, The Dispossessed. Can't say that it's likely to get the nuanced treatment it deserves, but an even-handed visualization of socialist vs. capitalist societies is overdue, and it's got spaceflight and FTL information transfer.
      Warren Ellis, Transmetropolitan. Not that he's ever going to grant the rights, but this one's a no-brainer for American cinema - brash, loud, splashy, violent, with bigger-than-life characters and themes.
      James Tiptree, Jr. (a/k/a Alice Sheldon), Her Smoke Rose Up Forever. I'd love to see a short series based on this collection.
      China Mieville - anything from the New Crobuzon books. The baroque ruin backgrounding the scenes, and the panoply of characters, should make for amazing cinema; a little judicious editing will be needed to make the stories work for the screen.
      [Obscure] Norman Spinrad's Bug Jack Barron, subject to timely and relevant updates for 21st Century media. There's a great theme about how selective presentation of video clips and the editor's viewpoint influences the story being told.
      K.W. Jeter, Farewell Horizontal, this one's gonna have great visuals, trust me.
      John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, remade as a story about border migration.
      Joe Haldeman, The Forever War - man, is it ever time for this one in the U.S.
      Dan Simmons, Hyperion - the World Tree, the Shrike, and plenty of other opportunities for fine visuals.
      Salman Rushdie, Haroun and the Sea of Stories. Another candidate for an anthology series; perfect for animation.
      Tibor Fischer, The Thought Gang - it's a heist story, but also a comedy and a satire. Kind of amazed no one has made it into a movie before.

      Biggest recent disappointment - The adaptation of Richard Morgan's Altered Carbon. Edited to completely discard the political messaging and amplify the sex/violence. Turgid, poor special effects, and gruesome acting.

      22 votes
    2. Why not merge ~movies into ~tv, or ~tv.movies?

      I'm banking on this having already been discussed, seeing as the groups have existed a while, so a link to previous discussions would be great. Reasons for (at the least a temporary) merge:...

      I'm banking on this having already been discussed, seeing as the groups have existed a while, so a link to previous discussions would be great.

      Reasons for (at the least a temporary) merge:

      1. ~movies sees relatively little activity compared to ~tv, and a merge would prevent its death
      2. They have very similar focuses and shows and movies are closely related
      3. ~anime already encompasses anime movies and shows, e.g. there's no ~animetv and ~animemovies

      Provided they are merged, this would raise the question of where old content on ~tv is moved to or kept as-is. I'd like to suggest creating the subgroup ~tv.shows for future "old" ~tv posts.

      10 votes
    3. How would you theoretically go about mitigating the potential near-complete loss of archived audio and video media from 1990 to 2020?

      This article from last year provides an alarming look into the woes that media preservation (specifically audio and video) is facing this century due to a content explosion that shows no signs of...

      This article from last year provides an alarming look into the woes that media preservation (specifically audio and video) is facing this century due to a content explosion that shows no signs of slowing down. It’s not a new problem, as journalist Bill Holland showed nearly 20 years ago (warning, it’s a long read).

      To summarize: In the past, many predecessors to existing media studios did a bad job of archiving their collections of recorded material. In some cases they actively destroyed or threw out parts of their catalogs to make way for new material. This wiped out portions of the available media to be preserved, especially the older stuff. Now that most studios have improved their archival practices though, their remaining catalogs are facing a new foe: Moore’s Law.

      The problem with LTO (tapes) is obsolescence. Since the beginning, the technology has been on a Moore’s Law–like march that has resulted in a doubling in tape storage densities every 18 to 24 months. As each new generation of LTO comes to market, an older generation of LTO becomes obsolete… Already there have been seven generations of LTO in the 18 years of the product’s existence… Given the short period of backward compatibility — just two generations — an LTO-5 cartridge, which can still be read on an LTO-7 drive, won’t be readable on an LTO-8 drive. So even if that tape is still free from defects in 30 or 50 years, all those gigabytes or terabytes of data will be worthless if you don’t also have a drive upon which to play it.

      If the worst case scenario were to happen, this is apparently what it would look like according to “a top technician at Technicolor”:

      “There’s going to be a large dead period,” he told me, “from the late ’90s through 2020, where most media will be lost.”

      But not everyone is that worried, the article also includes this counterpoint,

      “Most of the archivists I spoke with remain — officially at least — optimistic that a good, sound, post-LTO solution will eventually emerge.”

      /u/boredop and I have been discussing the implications of this in the thread they posted a few days ago about a John Coltrane release, and in the course of that discussion they provided that second link to Bill Holland’s multi-part investigation (thanks!).

      So my question is this: What direct or indirect measures would you theoretically take to prevent or mitigate the loss of the vast majority of recorded media from 1990 to 2020? Should any measures be taken to preserve these cultural artifacts?

      By direct measures I mean innovations to physical archiving or storage methods. By indirect measures I mean public awareness, strategies for choosing what to save, workarounds, etc.

      23 votes