• Activity
  • Votes
  • Comments
  • New
  • All activity
  • Showing only topics with the tag "cooking". Back to normal view
    1. Let's Share Recipes!

      With Pepperplate.com moving their service to an overpriced subscription (queue the exodus), I've been moving some key recipes over to Paprika¹, I figured it'd be a good time to ask for some decent...

      With Pepperplate.com moving their service to an overpriced subscription (queue the exodus), I've been moving some key recipes over to Paprika¹, I figured it'd be a good time to ask for some decent recipes.

      Tuck your recipe and method in a <details> with a good <summary> so the thread is easy to browse.

      I'll get us started!

      Coconut-Braised Chicken with Chorizo and Potatoes This comes from [Food and Wine Magazine](https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/coconut-braised-chicken-chorizo-and-potatoes)

      INGREDIENTS

      Chicken

      • 2 tablespoons canola oil
      • 6 whole chicken legs (2 pounds)
      • Kosher salt
      • Pepper
      • 1/2 pound fresh Mexican chorizo
      • 1 onion, thinly sliced
      • 1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
      • 1 garlic clove, minced
      • 1 dried chile de árbol, broken in half
      • 3 cups unsweetened coconut milk
      • 1 pound baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
      • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for serving
      • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

      Gremolata

      • 1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro, plus sprigs
      • 7 coffee beans, finely crushed (1/2 teaspoon)
      • 2 teaspoons finely grated lime zest

      METHOD

      Make the chicken

      • Preheat the oven to 425°. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat the oil. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Working in 2 batches, brown the chicken over moderate heat, turning occasionally, about 8 minutes per batch. Transfer the chicken to a large plate. Add the chorizo and onion to the casserole and cook, stirring to break up the meat, until the onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ginger, garlic and chile and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, potatoes and chicken to the casserole and bring to a simmer. Cover and braise in the oven for about 1 hour, until the chicken is cooked through. Stir in the lime juice and butter and season with salt.

      Make the Gremolata

      • In a small bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix well. Make sure the cilantro and lime zest is fairly dry, but not dehydrated.

      Plating

      • Spoon the braised chicken and potatoes into shallow bowls. Garnish with the gremolata 
and cilantro sprigs and serve with lime wedges.
      Gordon Ramsay's Stupid Simple Broccoli Soup

      INGREDIENTS

      • 1 large or two medium broccoli clusters (as fresh as possible)
      • Salt (3 tsp.)
      • Ground Black Pepper (4-5 turns on the grind wheel)
      • Water
      • Olive Oil
      • Goat Cheese (2 slices per bowl, preferably 'ashed')
      • Walnuts (about 5 per bowl)

      METHOD

      Cutting the Cheese

      • You will want to slice your goat cheese at this point
      • Dip the knife into the boiling hot water before each slice for even smooth cuts. Cut two slices of goat cheese per bowl being served. I like them about 5mm or so thick.
      • After cutting, use the hot smooth side of your knife to smooth one side of the cheese slices for appearance.

      The Soup

      • Your broccoli is finished cooking when you can pierce it with little or no effort. Remove the stock pan from the stove burner.

      DO NOT POUR THE WATER OUT!

      • Use a slotted spoon to add broccoli to a blender but be careful because it's boiling hot!
      • Pour enough of the water left over from cooking the broccoli to fill the blender half way.
      • Add a pinch (or more) of salt.
      • Use several pulses on your blender to break the broccoli up and then puree for several seconds.

      Plating

      • Add five walnuts to the bottom of a shallow bowl and then place pieces of goat cheese on top of them.
      • Pour soup into shallow bowl around the cheese, not on it. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and serve at once!
      Miso-Squash Soup with Sesame-Ginger Apples This is from [SeriousEats](https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/10/miso-squash-soup-recipe.html) and is another super simple soup that is always a hit.

      INGREDIENTS

      • 1 1/2 quarts plus 2 cups water, divided, plus more as needed
      • 1/2 ounce kombu (approximately a 4- by 6-inch piece; see note)
      • 1/2 ounce grated bonito flakes (about 3 cups; see note)
      • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon vegetable oil, divided
      • 1 leek, white and light green parts only, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
      • 2 medium carrots, diced (about 1 cup)
      • 2 medium cloves garlic, sliced
      • 2 (1 1/2-inch) knobs ginger, 1 knob peeled and thinly sliced, 1 knob peeled and finely grated, divided
      • 1 (2-pound) squash, such as kuri, kabocha, or butternut, peeled, seeded, and diced
      • 2 tablespoons white or red miso paste
      • 1 tablespoon fresh juice from 1 lemon
      • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
      • Pinch sugar, if needed
      • 1 large crisp apple, such as Fuji, peeled, cored, and diced
      • 1 large or 2 medium scallions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced on the bias
      • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
      • 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
      • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
      • Shichimi togarashi, optional

      METHOD

      • Combine 1 1/2 quarts water, kombu, and bonito flakes in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a bare simmer and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool for 5 minutes, then strain through a fine-mesh strainer. Discard solids and set dashi aside.
      • In a large Dutch oven or soup pot, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add leek, carrot, garlic, and sliced ginger. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are glistening and just starting to turn tender, about 4 minutes.
      • Add squash and pour just enough dashi on top to cover vegetables. Bring to a simmer and cook until vegetables are fully tender, about 30 minutes. Using a standing blender or immersion blender, and working in batches if necessary, blend soup until very smooth. Blend in miso and lemon juice.
      • Return soup to pot and thin with enough water to reach a pourable, silky-smooth consistency. Season with salt, add sugar to taste, and keep warm.
      • Meanwhile, fill a medium bowl with 2 cups water and 1 teaspoon kosher salt. Add diced apple and let soak for 10 minutes. Drain apple well, then return to bowl. Toss with grated ginger, scallions, toasted sesame seeds, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and remaining 1 teaspoon vegetable oil. Season with salt, if needed.
      • To serve, ladle hot soup into bowls and top with the apple-scallion salad. Garnish with shichimi togarashi, if desired.

      ¹Paprika is an overpriced recipe organizer -- paprikaapp.com -- it's okay, but also kind of lame.

      16 votes
    2. What piece of kitchen equipment do you regret buying, and why?

      What piece of kitchen equipment do you regret buying? Why? I bought a garlic masher. (I don't think it was anywhere near £26 when I bought it!)...

      What piece of kitchen equipment do you regret buying? Why?

      I bought a garlic masher. (I don't think it was anywhere near £26 when I bought it!) https://www.amazon.co.uk/royalvkb-VP303-370-Royal-Garlic-Crusher/dp/B000OW58D8/ It looks really heavy, but it actually isn't. I regret it because it's not nearly as much fun to use as it looks. It's safer than mashing garlic with a knife, and it's easier to clean than a press. But other than that it's not worth the money. The garlic cards (credit card sized bits of plastic with embossed letters) that you rub garlic over are better.

      22 votes
    3. The Chefs' Brigade

      This is a British cookery show. They take a bunch of people who cook for a living but who have basic skills. These people are paired with a chef who has four Michelin stars and eighteen...

      This is a British cookery show. They take a bunch of people who cook for a living but who have basic skills. These people are paired with a chef who has four Michelin stars and eighteen restaurants. They visit different restaurants around Europe to have competitions to cook that restaurant's own food.

      Things I enjoy about it: it does a good job of showing that people who have somewhat fucked up lives will always find a place in cheffing. They could have stayed in the UK but they decided to go around Europe.[1] There's a couple of incidents of poor behaviour being corrected (some of the women chefs are ignored and spoken over by some men, the women stand up for themselves and get an apology).

      Things I don't like: there's some cheffy bollocks around the pressure and discipline of a brigade; it's still a reality-show competition and that introduces some artificiallity; they send people home each week and I always hate that aspect of programmes.

      It's available on Pirate Bay.

      Here are some reviews which I think are fair.

      https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2019/jul/30/the-chefs-brigade-review-a-cookery-challenge-worthy-of-willy-wonka

      https://inews.co.uk/culture/television/the-chefs-brigade-bbc2-episode-1-review-jason-atherton/

      [1] I can't describe how pathologically awful Brexit has been for the UK. :-(

      7 votes
    4. What are some of the best recipes you've recently discovered?

      For me, it has to be ramen. It's so easy, yet so filling, and so tasty, and has practically infinite variations, so it can hardly get old! It can be done for one or more persons, and it replaces...

      For me, it has to be ramen. It's so easy, yet so filling, and so tasty, and has practically infinite variations, so it can hardly get old! It can be done for one or more persons, and it replaces an entire meal: having noodles as replacement for bread, meat, vegetables, and broth to drink afterwards. Just an all-around great thing. My family certainly loved it.

      14 votes
    5. Any other amateur bakers here with a favorite bread recipe?

      Does anyone have any good recipes for bread? My wife and I have been doing a lot of baking lately and I absolutely love making bread. It's easy (most of the work is sitting around waiting for it...

      Does anyone have any good recipes for bread?

      My wife and I have been doing a lot of baking lately and I absolutely love making bread. It's easy (most of the work is sitting around waiting for it to rise/proof) and we've been making fresh sandwich bread to use in our lunches for the past few months.

      I've found two recipes that I really like:

      17 votes
    6. Share your favorite vegetarian meals

      I'm making an effort to cut out meat from my diet and I'd love to hear what everyone's favourite vegetarian meals are. For a long time I have been making pasta with ground beef and I recently...

      I'm making an effort to cut out meat from my diet and I'd love to hear what everyone's favourite vegetarian meals are.

      For a long time I have been making pasta with ground beef and I recently found out that I can just not put the beef in and it tastes even better. The tomato sauce really gets a chance to shine without the beef.

      40 votes
    7. Do you have a favorite meal to cook?

      When I have the time, money, and energy, I like cooking proper meals from scratch (as much as is reasonable, anyway). There's one that I like making more than any other, though, and that I've been...

      When I have the time, money, and energy, I like cooking proper meals from scratch (as much as is reasonable, anyway). There's one that I like making more than any other, though, and that I've been making for several years now: pizza. There's nothing quite like a pizza made from freshly rolled dough, a good sauce, and cheese shredded by hand (with none of that cellulose getting in the way), and the smell of the yeast from the dough is wonderful. There's still quite a bit I need to learn to make it better, but I've so far gotten to the point of preferring it over anything you'd get from the popular pizza chains, so I'm pretty confident in what I've managed so far!

      What about you? Do you have a favorite? What meal do you consider your "specialty"? Is there anything in particular that keeps bringing you back to it?

      13 votes
    8. Dolmas [how to legally roll your own weed leaves]

      In a nutshell (TL;DR) Dolmas are stuffed grape leaves or vegetables (commonly peppers or zucchini) steamed for several minutes inside a pot with about an inch of salted water (or broth) brought to...
      In a nutshell (TL;DR)

      Dolmas are stuffed grape leaves or vegetables (commonly peppers or zucchini) steamed for several minutes inside a pot with about an inch of salted water (or broth) brought to a boil, then kept at a low simmer with a lid. The stuffing components vary and are easily tweaked for vegan/vegetarians or allergies, but often include a mixture of herbs and spices, rice (cooked or uncooked), eggs as a binder, and/or ground meat.

      For my next trick, I'll show you how to make them using only 4 words in the next sentence. Here's the entire process.


      Grocery list (ingredients in bold are suitable for vegans. Ingredients with a † are optional.)
      Dolmas
      • † 30 - 50 fresh grape leaves or brined leaves
      • 4 bell peppers
      • 1 - 2 tablespoons olive oil for drizzling
      • † juice of half a lemon
      • water or stock enough to cover an inch in the pot
      Filling
      • 500g [1 lb] ground meat (pork, beef, and lamb are most common)
      • † 180g [1 cup] uncooked white rice
      • 10g [1 TBSP] kosher salt
      • † 1 whole egg
      • † 1 diced medium onion
      • 2 - 4 tablespoons ground cumin
      • 2 - 4 tablespoons ground paprika
      • † 2 - 4 tablespoons ground coriander
      • † 1 - 2 tablespoons ground turmeric
      • 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
      • † 1 tablespoon dried red chili flakes
      Vegan prep

      Double the uncooked white rice and cook as directed on the package in water or vegetable stock with the salt, pepper, and spices. Let cool, then mix in diced onion (if using) and proceed with assembly and cooking as directed below, but reduce the total simmering time to 15 - 20 minutes.


      Step-by-step (with higher res photos)
      • Trim the stems off your fresh grape leaves and cut the tops off the bell peppers (if using), removing the stem and seedy core. Retain the cut piece as a "lid" for each pepper.
      • Add your stuffing ingredients to a large bowl and mix them all thoroughly with a spoon or clean wet hands.
      • Hold a prepared leaf centered on your palm underside (veiny side) up and place a tablespoon of filling towards the center of the leaf.
      • Fold the left bottom part of the leaf up horizontally and press onto the wet filling.
      • Fold the remaining left half vertically over the filling and press gently to crease.
      • Fold the right bottom part to cover the remaining exposed filling.
      • Fold the remaining right half of the leaf over the left.
      • Firmly roll the filled part of the wrapping up once. Press to shape into a rough cylinder.
      • Continue rolling until the end point of the leaf can be tucked under on a flat surface.
      • Repeat for the other leaves, but retain enough to cover each pepper lid.
      • Stuff the bell peppers with the remaining filling and top with a lid and a leaf to cover the stem hole.
      • Place the peppers upright in a large pot, leaning them against the sides if necessary.
      • Layer the stuffed leaves on the bottom of the pot between the peppers, flap end facing down.
      • Add cool water (or broth) just to cover the layer of wrapped leaves, or at least an inch. Don't worry if a few float up.
      • Drizzle with olive oil, grind some black pepper on, and add a couple good pinches of salt to the water - if you're only using bell peppers, squeeze in the juice of half a lemon to mimic the flavor the grape leaves would've added during cooking.
      • Bring to a boil over medium high heat, then add a lid and back the heat down just enough enough to simmer.
      • Let simmer for at least 45 minutes (60+ if using bell peppers) or until the meat is cooked and the rice soft enough to eat.

      Storage

      Store with the broth in the cooking pot for under a day. For longer, refrigerate and reheat on the stove or microwave. You can experiment with freezing cooked grape leaf dolmas and steaming them to thaw and re-cook, but I've never tried - they don't last long enough in my house.


      Sourcing grape leaves

      To identify a potential vine, look for curly forked tendrils that climb and clusters of tiny immature green grapes. This source has good photos and background info.

      Wild grapevines grow in many locations that are conducive to growing wine grapes. They often thrive in moist habitats located next to streams or riverbanks, but can also be found in forested areas, meadows, along roadsides and are especially fond of any kind of man-made fencing.

      Or you can get them in a jar online or in the international section of your local large grocery store.

      NB: Do your research and be careful when harvesting wild plants. The dangerous lookalikes to wild grapes are Canada moonseed (Menispermum canadense) and porcelain berry (Ampelopsis glandulosa var. brevipendunculata)


      Storytime?

      What? Does this look like a typically self-indulgent food blogger post florid with vapid musings only tangentially related to the recipe because longer word count pushes such entries to top SEO results? ...ok, just this once.

      Used to work with an older Iraqi watchmaker who came to the country as a highly-skilled refugee. Sometimes I'd give him a ride to the shop from his apartment, and in limited English he'd insist on cooking us dinner before I left. When he visited another co-worker's place, he noticed wild grape leaves on several vines growing out of the property, and collected them. I saw the leaf pile on the counter and asked what he was going to do with them, and if he was sure they were edible. "Yes, yes! For dolmas. I'll show you," he said, removing a pack of ground pork and bell peppers from the fridge.

      For the next couple summers, I made dolmas from the wild grapes in the neighborhood, and now I have good neighbors who allow me to prune and harvest excess leaves from their fruiting grapevines during the season.

      9 votes