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    1. Full Season Playlist Prologue - What Makes the Perfect Pizza? (5:18) - edit: new 50min uncut version Episode 1 - Claire Tries To Make the Perfect Pizza Dough (37:27) Episode 2 - Brad and Andy Try...

      Full Season Playlist

      Prologue - What Makes the Perfect Pizza? (5:18) - edit: new 50min uncut version
      Episode 1 - Claire Tries To Make the Perfect Pizza Dough (37:27)
      Episode 2 - Brad and Andy Try to Make the Perfect Pizza Sauce (27:52)
      Episode 3 - Carla and Molly Try to Make the Perfect Pizza Cheese (50:38)
      Episode 4 - Chris and Andy Try to Make the Perfect Pizza Toppings (38:44)
      Episode 5 - Brad, Claire, Carla, Molly, Chris & Andy Cook the Perfect Pizza (24:26)

      10 votes
    2. I'll start: Hessian 'Tater soup. Maybe not very exciting, but I just love the stuff. Start off with a diced onion and about 1 - 1.5 kg of peeled, sliced potatoes. Throw into a big pot on high heat...

      I'll start: Hessian 'Tater soup. Maybe not very exciting, but I just love the stuff.

      Start off with a diced onion and about 1 - 1.5 kg of peeled, sliced potatoes. Throw into a big pot on high heat with some oil and let it develop some color. Meanwhile, get peeling and chopping on this stuff - carrots, celery root, leek, parsley, parsley root. Amounts as desired, but I like to use a lot of parsley - root or leafs. If your taters get enough color, cover with water and add the rest of the veggies. All that in place, cook until soft. Blend. Add 200ml of sour cream and season with nutmeg, pepper and salt. Consistency should be thick, maybe slightly chunky.

      When serving, fry up a few slices of old sausage to throw in there. This one is a traditional north hessian sausage, but any only lightly spiced and smoked, coarse ground, fatty hard sausage will do. Add a sprig of parsley if you feel like upping the presentation.

      24 votes
    3. For me, it has to be ramen. It's so easy, yet so filling, and so tasty, and has practically infinite variations, so it can hardly get old! It can be done for one or more persons, and it replaces...

      For me, it has to be ramen. It's so easy, yet so filling, and so tasty, and has practically infinite variations, so it can hardly get old! It can be done for one or more persons, and it replaces an entire meal: having noodles as replacement for bread, meat, vegetables, and broth to drink afterwards. Just an all-around great thing. My family certainly loved it.

      15 votes
    4. Does anyone have any good recipes for bread? My wife and I have been doing a lot of baking lately and I absolutely love making bread. It's easy (most of the work is sitting around waiting for it...

      Does anyone have any good recipes for bread?

      My wife and I have been doing a lot of baking lately and I absolutely love making bread. It's easy (most of the work is sitting around waiting for it to rise/proof) and we've been making fresh sandwich bread to use in our lunches for the past few months.

      I've found two recipes that I really like:

      17 votes
    5. I'm making an effort to cut out meat from my diet and I'd love to hear what everyone's favourite vegetarian meals are. For a long time I have been making pasta with ground beef and I recently...

      I'm making an effort to cut out meat from my diet and I'd love to hear what everyone's favourite vegetarian meals are.

      For a long time I have been making pasta with ground beef and I recently found out that I can just not put the beef in and it tastes even better. The tomato sauce really gets a chance to shine without the beef.

      40 votes
    6. I'm fairly happy with mine, it's simple and tastes good, but I'm hardly a chef so I'm sure it can be improved. Bonus points if its simple enough to do when you're tired as hell and just want a...

      I'm fairly happy with mine, it's simple and tastes good, but I'm hardly a chef so I'm sure it can be improved. Bonus points if its simple enough to do when you're tired as hell and just want a nice drink.

      Mine:

      Start heating milk on low heat, then slowly add sugar and cocoa powder while mixing, 1 tbs each per 4oz of milk. I find this pushes the saturation limit of the milk a bit too close, so I add some more in to make sure everything dissolves. Add in some cinnamon, along with a pinch of nutmeg and salt. Once hot splash in a bit of cool cream and serve.

      19 votes
    7. Sourdough Bavarian-style Pretzels — Laugenbrezel und Laugenstangen Makes six. Sourdough Starter | 250g (100% hydration, 125g each flour/water) Water | 100g Bread Flour | 300g Fat | 14g (used bacon...

      Sourdough Bavarian-style Pretzels — Laugenbrezel und Laugenstangen

      Makes six.

      Sourdough Starter | 250g (100% hydration, 125g each flour/water)
      Water | 100g
      Bread Flour | 300g
      Fat | 14g (used bacon fat)
      Salt | 10g
      Honey | 2g (optional)

      Hydration: 52.9%


      Combine throughouly: Starter, Water, Honey, Fat + 90g Flour.
      Add Salt, mix.
      Add remaining flour (210g), and mix until a shaggy mass forms.
      Turn out onto clean surface, knead for approximately 10 minutes.
      Rest dough for 5 minutes, covered.
      Divide dough into six equal pieces (~110g each), form into balls.
      Rest dough for 5 minutes, covered.
      Smoosh dough with your hands to degas, roll out into desired shapes.
      Place shaped dough onto an oiled rack, ferment at room temperature at least 45 minutes, uncovered.
      Chill dough in refridgerator for 60 minutes. After 30 minutes, preheat oven to 425°F (218°C).
      Prepare a 4% lye (sodium hydroxide) solution, by weight, using !COLD! water. Whisk until dissolved.
      ⚠️ Lye is highly caustic. Do not get it on your skin. We've all seen Fight Club; wear gloves. ⚠️
      ⚠️ Make sure your lye is pure. Add lye to water, not water to lye. There is an exothermic reaction. ⚠️
      ⚠️ You can use baking soda instead, but the taste, texture, and process are different. ⚠️
      Submerge your shapes into the solution for just a few seconds, place back onto the rack.
      Coat with the coarsest salt you own. Score with a sharp knife, or razor blade.
      Cook for 22-25 minutes, or until deep brown.
      Let cool, but enjoy warm.


      This was a fun experiment I tried with yesterdays sourdough discard. I modified and adapted a few recipes I had found for Bavarian Pretzels to make a sourdough version that was my own. It mostly worked, but since I used discard the yeasts weren't as active as they would have been if I used starter several hours after feeding. I've been baking more often, so I've taken my starter out of the fidge and it's getting daily feedings at room temp.
      I should have probably let these ferment for another 15 minutes at least, to give the yeasts more time to do their thing, and they could have used another couple of minutes in the oven as the very center was everso-slightly oonderbaked.

      I don't imagine the fat matters too much. A lot of the recipes I found used lard, but I keep bacon fat in the fridge and that worked just fine. I can't say it gave these a bacon-y taste. Butter would probably work, but that's around 17% water and wil change your hydration level so keep that in mind. If you're a vegetarian, I imagine vegetable shortening would probably be fine. Maybe a refined coconut oil.

      The honey I used as a (I think 1:7) replacement for Barely Malt Syrup, which I understand is a flavoring element. I didn't feel like going out to find some, so I replaced with honey so my yeasts would have some kind of sugar to munch on, at least. I'm not sure if it did anything, so good news for vegans.

      Pics:
      Look these delicious little guys.

      I'm so good at making pretzel shapes.

      8 votes
    8. Whats this about? @wanda-seldon started a thread over at ~science in hopes of generating more user created content. My plan is to post some introductions myself, in fields like mechanical...

      Whats this about?

      @wanda-seldon started a thread over at ~science in hopes of generating more user created content. My plan is to post some introductions myself, in fields like mechanical engineering and automation (is anyone interested in it anyways?). But until I feel like I would do it proper, I figured I'd try something similar with a much lower barrier of entry. I'll write about some hobbies of mine, in a way that goes more indepth about the process, but still shallow enough to function as an introduction. And if folks are interested in more in-depth stuff or pointers on where to go, I'll take care of that.

      So on todays topic, homebrewing. What is it, why would you bother, and what's actually involved in it?

      What's Homebrewing?

      Put simply, homebrewing is the art of making beer yourself. It's not really that complicated to be honest.

      Why Homebrewing?

      • It's (relatively) cheap.

      If you got a few basic kitchen items (pots, ladle, cups, etc), you already have most items needed for brewing a small quantity. A few additional tools will be required, like a food grade plastic container, a water lock, etc. but if you treat them proper they can be used for years after years. Ingredient cost is neglible.

      • Quality.

      A common reaction many have with homebrewed beer is how thick and rich in flavour it is, compared to your average supermarket beer. Especially if your experience is with light beers (in which case I believe Monty Python said it best, it's fucking close to water). It's like comparing that sad pie you can buy in the cooler section, compared to something fresh out of the oven with the sweetest fruits and crispiest crust.

      • Easy to learn, hard to master.

      If your goal is to make a good beer, you only need two "skills". Good working hygiene and patience. Beyond that, any complication you want to add is up to you. You can start with a simple ale and work your way towards horribly complicated recipes that seem more like a chemistry exam than a hobby.

      Whats actually involved in it?

      So what do you actually do? I'll keep it short, even though I could write a book if I wanted to cover everything. Brewing is made out of three phases. The actual brewing, the fermenting and the bottling.

      Brewing

      You mix malts (and/or barley, wheat, oats, etc) with water, which you will draw a wort from. The wort will be the basis of your beer. A wort is a bit like a tea from a tea mix in this sense. Also it's sickly sweet (so taste test on your own risk). The sugar from the malt will be what is turned into alcohol during fermentation. In a similar way, that we use fruit sugar for wines/ciders or honey for mead.

      Fun fact: In Sweden and Norway, elks drunk on rotten (fermented) fruit they eat from the ground is a rare but real phenomena.

      Once you have a wort, the wort is boiled up and hops are supplied. Usually hops are divided in two categories. Bitter hops and aroma hops. Though that has more to do with when you add hops in the brewing process. The hops add flavour primarily from the oils (which give the fresh and fruity taste) and the resin (which gives the bitter taste). The resin takes a certain amount of boiling time to properly release, so hops added early in the process will contribute to bitterness.

      The liquid is then cooled and stored in a container with a bit of yeast. That marks the start of the fermentation period.

      Fermentation

      Fermentation is fairly straight forward. Yeast loves sugar. And will keep eating it until most is gone. Alcohol, is a byproduct of this process.

      Bottling

      Once fermentation is (nearly) done, the beer is transferred into bottles. After a few days of waiting, a pressure should have built inside your bottles which will create the nice bubbliness we know from beers. Toss on a label if you wan't to brag and want to make sure that graphical designer education was not for naught.

      Swell, how do I get into it?

      How do you get into it? Technically speaking, you could start with no-mash brewing. Though I would recommend against it, as it takes out the charm of actually brewing, since you just add water and call it a day. Alternatively, there are several good sources on this. The american homebrewers association for instance have a good quick guide for some instructions. Though if you wan't to go serious about it, I recommend to read up on the specific processes, and what influences them.

      Afterwords

      Does it sound interesting? Bring a buddy, and make a day of it. Make your own labels too if you wan't to brag to friends and family. If you have questions, I will answer anything. Need help setting up or want a plan, I can help with that too.

      Edit: Would recommend reading @piratepants comment in the comment section. It expands a lot of the things mentioned here, and goes a lot more into the actual processes while brewing. If you got this far, it's worth continueing.

      24 votes
    9. Thought I would share this simple recipe for protein bars I've been making for the last year or so. I used to spend something like $50-$60 per/mo. on the store-bought kind so these have saved me a...

      Thought I would share this simple recipe for protein bars I've been making for the last year or so. I used to spend something like $50-$60 per/mo. on the store-bought kind so these have saved me a good bit of $. Bonus points for taking, at most, 10 minutes to put together.

      • 1 1/2 cups old fashioned oats
      • 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder (chocolate also tastes good)
      • 3/4 cup natural peanut butter
      • 1/4 cup mini chocolate chips
      • 2 tbs. almond milk

      Mix together and mold into bars or roll into balls, and refrigerate for 30-40 mins before eating. Each batch makes about 6 bars or 12 balls.

      They don't look like much, but they taste great!

      19 votes
    10. Frozen chicken wings, about $5 a pound at the local Winco. Defrosted half in the microwave for about 5 minutes. Rubbed on Olive oil, threw in the air fryer for about 30 minutes at 400 degrees (f)....

      Frozen chicken wings, about $5 a pound at the local Winco. Defrosted half in the microwave for about 5 minutes. Rubbed on Olive oil, threw in the air fryer for about 30 minutes at 400 degrees (f). Sprinkled on Tumeric, Paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepper.

      Holy shit is this good.

      5 votes
    11. I've decided to get in to baking bread recently, and sourdough seemed like a good place to start. A couple weeks ago I established my starter, and this is the second loaf I've made so far. My...

      I've decided to get in to baking bread recently, and sourdough seemed like a good place to start. A couple weeks ago I established my starter, and this is the second loaf I've made so far. My first one was sans filling, and came out very dense. I don't have a stand-mixer, nor the cash for one, so I'm doing this by hand. I'm also flying blind, I hadn't expected things to be so nuanced as they are!

      Here's how I made this one:

      King Arthur Bread Flour 600g
      Water 400g
      Starter 200g
      Kosher Salt 10g
      Extra-Sharp Cheddar 100g
      Fresh Jalapeño (sliced)
      apprx 70g (2 peppers)
      1. Mix starter and water (I used slightly warm tap water) in Bowl 1
      2. Whisk flour and salt until smooth in Bowl 2
      3. Added sliced jalapeño and shredded cheese, mix until evenly dispersed
      4. Add wet to dry, mix until just combined
      5. Cover bowl with tea towel, walk away for 16 hours
      6. Knead dough on lightly floured surface for ~1 minute, tuck into ball shape
      7. Place dough ball in bowl, atop floured tea towel, cover, wait 2 hours
      8. Place dutch oven in oven, preheat oven to 475°F (approx 250°C)
      9. Remove dutch oven. Place dough inside, seam-side down. Slice top with razor, spritz with water.
      10. Cover, place in oven and turn down to 430°F (approx 220°C)
      11. Remove lid after 25 minutes. Cook another 45 minutes or until golden.
      12. Cool completely

      It didn't come out perfect, but that's what I did to make it. I'm sure I'll make endless adjustments as I make more until I figure out what really works for me, and learn about the nitty-gritty of hydration levels and such. I'll probably make a loaf every week, since that seems to be how long it takes me to eat one lol
      The cheese amount was arbitrary, as were the peppers. I thought the flavor was pretty good, and a spread of 5-pepper preserves made it something else.

      Something I've noticed, is after a couple days the crust loses its crisp and becomes chewy. Is that to be expected? I assume that has to do with the hydration within the loaf equalizing.

      Note: ~ is for high-quality content and such, and this feels a bit fluffy, but ~food is pretty dead so let me know what y'all think about this as a post and if this kind of content is valuable here.

      19 votes
    12. As the title says, I am looking for your go-to recipes for when you are not in the mood to cook. They should be fast and simple to make and be preferably not too expensive. Let me start this:...

      As the title says, I am looking for your go-to recipes for when you are not in the mood to cook. They should be fast and simple to make and be preferably not too expensive.

      Let me start this: Tortelloni with tarragon-cream-sauce (3-6€/2servings, depending on the tortelloni)
      *500g Tortelloni, 250ml (sweet) cream, 2 tomatos, tarragon/salt/pepper;

      1. Water with salt in one pot, cream with tarragon and 4 short splashes of water in another;
      2. Cut the tomatos into pieces and add the to the cream when it boils slightly
      3. When the tomatos are added, stir the cream (it should get slightly red from the tomato juice
      4. add salt and pepper
      5. at this point the water should be boiling, add the Tortelloni
        5.1 I usually buy the Tortelloni from the fridge, they only need to be boiled for 2 min, adjust the timing when you heat up the cream according to needed time to boil the pasta
      6. When everything is finished put everything together and enjoy
      25 votes
    13. I always look forward to fresh ingredients for substantial salads during the hot months of summer. Unfortunately, my repertoire is wanting. I make the same basic salad every time just changing a...

      I always look forward to fresh ingredients for substantial salads during the hot months of summer. Unfortunately, my repertoire is wanting. I make the same basic salad every time just changing a few ingredients depending on availability. This consists of greens, sometimes cold penne or other pasta, usually garbanzo beans, sometimes meat of some kind, tomatoes, cucumbers, celery, basil or oregano and/or mint and perhaps hard boiled egg, sometimes pickled beets.

      Thanks for any suggestions or recipes.

      4 votes
    14. In a nutshell (TL;DR) Dolmas are stuffed grape leaves or vegetables (commonly peppers or zucchini) steamed for several minutes inside a pot with about an inch of salted water (or broth) brought to...
      In a nutshell (TL;DR)

      Dolmas are stuffed grape leaves or vegetables (commonly peppers or zucchini) steamed for several minutes inside a pot with about an inch of salted water (or broth) brought to a boil, then kept at a low simmer with a lid. The stuffing components vary and are easily tweaked for vegan/vegetarians or allergies, but often include a mixture of herbs and spices, rice (cooked or uncooked), eggs as a binder, and/or ground meat.

      For my next trick, I'll show you how to make them using only 4 words in the next sentence. Here's the entire process.


      Grocery list (ingredients in bold are suitable for vegans. Ingredients with a † are optional.)
      Dolmas
      • † 30 - 50 fresh grape leaves or brined leaves
      • 4 bell peppers
      • 1 - 2 tablespoons olive oil for drizzling
      • † juice of half a lemon
      • water or stock enough to cover an inch in the pot
      Filling
      • 500g [1 lb] ground meat (pork, beef, and lamb are most common)
      • † 180g [1 cup] uncooked white rice
      • 10g [1 TBSP] kosher salt
      • † 1 whole egg
      • † 1 diced medium onion
      • 2 - 4 tablespoons ground cumin
      • 2 - 4 tablespoons ground paprika
      • † 2 - 4 tablespoons ground coriander
      • † 1 - 2 tablespoons ground turmeric
      • 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
      • † 1 tablespoon dried red chili flakes
      Vegan prep

      Double the uncooked white rice and cook as directed on the package in water or vegetable stock with the salt, pepper, and spices. Let cool, then mix in diced onion (if using) and proceed with assembly and cooking as directed below, but reduce the total simmering time to 15 - 20 minutes.


      Step-by-step (with higher res photos)
      • Trim the stems off your fresh grape leaves and cut the tops off the bell peppers (if using), removing the stem and seedy core. Retain the cut piece as a "lid" for each pepper.
      • Add your stuffing ingredients to a large bowl and mix them all thoroughly with a spoon or clean wet hands.
      • Hold a prepared leaf centered on your palm underside (veiny side) up and place a tablespoon of filling towards the center of the leaf.
      • Fold the left bottom part of the leaf up horizontally and press onto the wet filling.
      • Fold the remaining left half vertically over the filling and press gently to crease.
      • Fold the right bottom part to cover the remaining exposed filling.
      • Fold the remaining right half of the leaf over the left.
      • Firmly roll the filled part of the wrapping up once. Press to shape into a rough cylinder.
      • Continue rolling until the end point of the leaf can be tucked under on a flat surface.
      • Repeat for the other leaves, but retain enough to cover each pepper lid.
      • Stuff the bell peppers with the remaining filling and top with a lid and a leaf to cover the stem hole.
      • Place the peppers upright in a large pot, leaning them against the sides if necessary.
      • Layer the stuffed leaves on the bottom of the pot between the peppers, flap end facing down.
      • Add cool water (or broth) just to cover the layer of wrapped leaves, or at least an inch. Don't worry if a few float up.
      • Drizzle with olive oil, grind some black pepper on, and add a couple good pinches of salt to the water - if you're only using bell peppers, squeeze in the juice of half a lemon to mimic the flavor the grape leaves would've added during cooking.
      • Bring to a boil over medium high heat, then add a lid and back the heat down just enough enough to simmer.
      • Let simmer for at least 45 minutes (60+ if using bell peppers) or until the meat is cooked and the rice soft enough to eat.

      Storage

      Store with the broth in the cooking pot for under a day. For longer, refrigerate and reheat on the stove or microwave. You can experiment with freezing cooked grape leaf dolmas and steaming them to thaw and re-cook, but I've never tried - they don't last long enough in my house.


      Sourcing grape leaves

      To identify a potential vine, look for curly forked tendrils that climb and clusters of tiny immature green grapes. This source has good photos and background info.

      Wild grapevines grow in many locations that are conducive to growing wine grapes. They often thrive in moist habitats located next to streams or riverbanks, but can also be found in forested areas, meadows, along roadsides and are especially fond of any kind of man-made fencing.

      Or you can get them in a jar online or in the international section of your local large grocery store.

      NB: Do your research and be careful when harvesting wild plants. The dangerous lookalikes to wild grapes are Canada moonseed (Menispermum canadense) and porcelain berry (Ampelopsis glandulosa var. brevipendunculata)


      Storytime?

      What? Does this look like a typically self-indulgent food blogger post florid with vapid musings only tangentially related to the recipe because longer word count pushes such entries to top SEO results? ...ok, just this once.

      Used to work with an older Iraqi watchmaker who came to the country as a highly-skilled refugee. Sometimes I'd give him a ride to the shop from his apartment, and in limited English he'd insist on cooking us dinner before I left. When he visited another co-worker's place, he noticed wild grape leaves on several vines growing out of the property, and collected them. I saw the leaf pile on the counter and asked what he was going to do with them, and if he was sure they were edible. "Yes, yes! For dolmas. I'll show you," he said, removing a pack of ground pork and bell peppers from the fridge.

      For the next couple summers, I made dolmas from the wild grapes in the neighborhood, and now I have good neighbors who allow me to prune and harvest excess leaves from their fruiting grapevines during the season.

      9 votes
    15. What's your go-to weekend dish? Whether it's a fried breakfast or eight hour smoked pork shoulder, what do you love to cook on the weekend? Personally it's split between bacon and egg sandwiches...

      What's your go-to weekend dish? Whether it's a fried breakfast or eight hour smoked pork shoulder, what do you love to cook on the weekend?

      Personally it's split between bacon and egg sandwiches on homemade bread; my chili recipe, loosely based on SeriousEats Best Ever Chili and potato, chorizo, and cabbage hash with a runny egg on top.

      8 votes
    16. I've somewhat recently become vegan and am looking for more recipes to cook. I love pretty much all kinds of food, especially kinds I haven't tried before. If anybody has any great recipes that...

      I've somewhat recently become vegan and am looking for more recipes to cook. I love pretty much all kinds of food, especially kinds I haven't tried before. If anybody has any great recipes that are vegan, I would love to share.

      9 votes
    17. Quite a lot of us will have them. They are pretty damn useful, and make for decent lazy meals. Apart from stock, here is one of the recipes I really like for the IP....

      Quite a lot of us will have them. They are pretty damn useful, and make for decent lazy meals.

      Apart from stock, here is one of the recipes I really like for the IP.

      https://www.justonecookbook.com/pressure-cooker-pork-belly-kakuni/

      Japanese pork belly slices. Works brilliantly and stunning flavour. In fact Just One Cookbook is generally a great site, but this was the first of theirs I tried. I make it every time my wife goes away as it's not her thing, but I love it.

      Interested in your favourites!

      15 votes
    18. I'm in the U.S. and Summer potluck season is upon us. What are your favorite crowd-pleasers? I recently made this Mexcian Street Corn Salad for a work event and it went over really well. That was...

      I'm in the U.S. and Summer potluck season is upon us. What are your favorite crowd-pleasers? I recently made this Mexcian Street Corn Salad for a work event and it went over really well. That was branching out for me. I feel like I always make the same two tired potluck dishes and would love to hear yours.

      6 votes